Active & Future Fighter Aircrafts - Around the World | Page 12 | World Defense

Active & Future Fighter Aircrafts - Around the World

mtime7

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Here's the Tech That Will Define the Air Force's Secret New Fighter Jet​

The sixth generation of combat aircraft likely looks like this.
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  • Engineers are already sketching out must-have technology for sixth-generation fighters, including the Air Force’s secret new fighter jet.
  • Sixth-gen fighters will likely start entering service in large numbers in the mid-2030s.
  • Consolidation and simplicity are essential features, with technology easing the burden on designers, pilots, and maintainers alike
The race to build cutting-edge fighter jets is back with a vengeance. Today, with less than 1,000 fifth-generation fighters flying worldwide, the world is already looking ahead to the next generation.

What technologies and capabilities will define the so-called “sixth generation,” including the Air Force’s secret new fighter jet, which it shockingly designed, tested, and flew in the span of just one year? The answer might surprise you.

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It looks like this

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It uses F1 style engineering

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It's stuffed with secret tech

The fall of the Soviet Union in 1991 put the brakes on more than 45 years of intense fighter jet development. The Cold War saw the rapid introduction of several key technologies, including jet engines, radar-guided missiles, heads-up displays, and stealth, plus the development of the first four generations of postwar fighter aircraft. In the 2000s, the U.S. released the first fifth-generation fighter, the F-22 Raptor.

Fifth-generation fighters are generally defined as aircraft developed from the ground up with radar-evading stealth, the ability to cruise above Mach 1 without afterburners, advanced radars and infrared sensors, and the extensive use of computers and software to not only fly the airplane, but also process sensor data.

Since the Raptor’s debut, other planes to join the fifth-generation pantheon include the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter and its international rivals, the Chengdu J-20 and Sukhoi Su-57.

The evolving great power environment, particularly Russia and China acting aggressively against their neighbors while beefing up their armed forces, is driving increased spending on fighters. The U.S., Japan, the U.K., and France and Germany are all working to develop sixth-generation fighters. The question is: Just what makes up a sixth-gen fighter, anyway?

n a recent webinar, engineers at Raytheon Intelligence & Space revealed they believe the next generation of fighters will be defined by several new technologies, including just one large transmitter that acts as an air-to-air radar, air-to-ground radar, radio, and electronic warfare platform. A single system controlled by software would replace several different systems, switching between tasks as needed.

The Raytheon engineers said sixth-gen fighters will also include self-landing systems, according to an Aerotech News recap of the webinar. Future aircraft will likely be designed to land autonomously on aircraft carriers, which could be used to land the aircraft in rough weather at a “precise landing zone.” A sixth-gen fighter could land autonomously, without human control, or provide guidance to pilots landing under challenging circumstances.

And then there’s artificial intelligence, which will function as a sort of copilot to a human pilot on a next-gen fighter jet. In fact, earlier this year, the Air Force revealed its secret new fighter jet will have an R2-D2-style sidekick, similar to the AI that operated a U-2 spy plane in an historic first.

A cockpit-bound AI could oversee the jamming of enemy radars and monitor for threats to the plane, like incoming missiles, and then automatically launch chaff or flares to lure the missile away. AI could also be used to fly a “loyal wingman” drone, a semi-autonomous uncrewed aircraft that could fly alongside crewed fighters.

What other bells and whistles will define the fighters of the future? We’ll find out soon enough.
 

Scorpio

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In the 80s, the MiG Design Bureau began work on the "МДП" (Multifunctional Long Range Interceptor) project to replace the MiG-31 interceptor. Later, the МДП became known as the "product 7.01". Like its predecessor, the task of the МДП was to patrol and protect the long borders of the USSR with a high degree of autonomy.

News rumored that russian will be going to restart this project with changes
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mtime7

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Britain's New Tempest Stealth Fighter Has a Big Problem: Cost​

Britain might be able to pull off creating a powerful new stealth fighter, but the price tag might mean London will have to cut purchases of the American-made F-35 stealth jet.

by Mark Episkopos

The United Kingdom is forging ahead with its ambitious project to produce a home-grown stealth warplane, even as it strives to retain its status as one of the core partners in the F-35 stealth fighter jet program.

London is doubling down on plans to indigenously produce its upcoming BAE Systems Tempest jet fighter, a next-generation successor to the United Kingdom’s Eurofighter Typhoon fleet. In a March 2021 Command Paper to Parliament, the British Ministry of Defense (MOD) reiterated that the Tempest fighter will be a major procurement priority into the coming decades. “Tempest will exploit our unique industrial base to create a 6th generation combat air enterprise centred in the UK,” the paper reads. “This fully digital enterprise will transform delivery, achieving pace and lowering cost and disrupting traditional approaches to defence procurement.”


The Tempest project’s current partners include Italy and Sweden. The government, which has always been clear that the financial solvency of the Tempest project hinges on securing a steady stream of foreign investment, is also currently exploring partnership opportunities with Japan.
As with most other next-generation fighters, the Tempest fighter will offer its own form of sensor fusion. The fighter’s ambitious Tempest’s Multi-Function Radio Frequency System (MFRFS) data collection protocols will be “four times as accurate as existing sensors in a package 1/10th the size,” according to defense contractor and Tempest partner Leonardo. The MFRFS will filter the battlefield information it collects through its onboard processor suite, generating a dynamic picture of the battlefield that can include everything from enemy movements to terrain layout. Like the F-35 jet, the Tempest fighter can also act as a flying command and control center by feeding some of that information to nearby friendly units. The Tempest project is betting big on future-oriented experimental avionics systems, with BAE Systems working on a “wearable cockpit” interface that replaces both analog and digital inputs with augmented reality (AR) display, supported by an integrated network of artificial intelligence (AI) features.

The Tempest’s project’s preoccupation with unorthodox prototype technologies extends to its weapons loadout. At a Rome seminar on missile defense, Italy’s General Enzo Vecciarelli suggested that the Tempest fighter could incorporate directed-energy weapons to counter hypersonic missiles. “On Tempest there will be a large amount of energy available and I don’t rule out the use of directed energy,” Vecciarelli said. It was previously confirmed that the Tempest fighter will also carry hypersonic missiles of its own, in addition to being able to operate drone swarms.

As the Tempest project moves further along in the development stage, the fate of the UK’s massive F-35 jet procurement plans hangs in the balance. As a “Level 1” partner in the F-35 program, London previously stated it will purchase as many as 138 units of Lockheed Martin’s fifth-generation stealth fighter. London, however, has so far only ordered forty-eight F-35 jet fighters. The MOD says it plans to “grow the [F-35] Force, increasing the fleet size beyond the 48 aircraft that we have already ordered,” but is dragging its feet on whether or not it remains committed to an acquisition target of 138 F-35 fighters.

The Tempest fighter is projected to reach Initial Operating Capability (IOC) by 2035.
 
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