Indian Navy plans to acquire its third aircraft carrier for a whopping Rs 1.6 lakh crore

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jbgt90

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https://www.indiatoday.in/mail-toda...whopping-rs-1-6-lakh-crore-1144836-2018-01-15

1516020646356.png


The Indian Navy is moving ahead with a big-ticket proposal for acquiring its third aircraft carrier which is expected to cost around Rs 1.6 lakh crore along with the additional component of 57 fighter aircraft.
The Navy has one operational aircraft carrier in the INS Vikramaditya while another one, INS Vikrant, is under construction at the Cochin Shipyard Limited (CSL) and is expected to join service in the next few years.
“The Navy is planning to field its Rs 70,000 crore proposal before the defence ministry in near future which will cost around Rs 1.6 lakh crore at the approval stage itself along with the fighter plane component and the actual costs will go higher further as the programme moves ahead,” government sources told Mail Today.
The Navy has plans of buying 57 twin-engine fighter planes for the third aircraft carrier for which American F-18 and French Dassault Rafale are in the race.
“If one goes by the cost of the 36 Rafales acquired for the Air Force, the 57 planes are not going to cost us less than Rs 90,000-95,000 crore,” the sources said.
Citing the Chinese threat, the Navy had been asking for construction of the third nuclearpowered aircraft carrier using American technology and systems which is going to be far more expensive in comparison with the existing systems.
The Navy has been arguing that it should have one aircraft carrier each for the eastern and western sea boards with one aircraft carrier in reserve to take care of the time taken for refit and repair of any of the two carriers.
However, the defence ministry is not very keen on the project due to the high costs involved in it and it would force the government to change its acquisition plans for the coming years compelling it to wait list a number of other urgently required weapon systems of the Army and the Air Force, sources said.
The cost of equipment for the aircraft carrier take-off patented by an American private sector firm will also be a major factor in determining the final cost of the carrier for India, the sources said.
For buying the aircraft for the aircraft carrier, the Navy had floated a request for information (RFI) but it has not got any clearance from the defence ministry for issuing the tender for the project.
However, the Navy has already allowed the vendors to give it a presentation on whether their planes would be able to take off from the Russian-origin INS Vikramaditya or not. Defence ministry sources also said the need for further expanding the aircraft carrier fleet needs to be thought over again as all targets and routes in the Indian Ocean Region (IOR) can be looked after well by the existing assets and bases in the area.
Due to this reason, the defence ministry had refused to clear the five-year programme of the Navy as agreeing to it would required at least doubling the current acquisition budget of the ministry.
The government of India already spends 28 per cent of its total acquisition budget on fulfilling the requirements of the three services and increasing it to a higher level does not seem possible in the near future, sources said.
 
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jbgt90

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@khafee @WebMaster just some thing we were discussing a few days ago, Knowing how strong the US lobby is in India i have a feeling they may go with the F18.
 
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@khafee @WebMaster just some thing we were discussing a few days ago, Knowing how strong the US lobby is in India i have a feeling they may go with the F18.
Rs 1.6 lakh crore = how much in INR Billions ?
 
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https://www.indiatoday.in/mail-toda...whopping-rs-1-6-lakh-crore-1144836-2018-01-15

View attachment 5310

The Indian Navy is moving ahead with a big-ticket proposal for acquiring its third aircraft carrier which is expected to cost around Rs 1.6 lakh crore along with the additional component of 57 fighter aircraft.
The Navy has one operational aircraft carrier in the INS Vikramaditya while another one, INS Vikrant, is under construction at the Cochin Shipyard Limited (CSL) and is expected to join service in the next few years.
“The Navy is planning to field its Rs 70,000 crore proposal before the defence ministry in near future which will cost around Rs 1.6 lakh crore at the approval stage itself along with the fighter plane component and the actual costs will go higher further as the programme moves ahead,” government sources told Mail Today.
The Navy has plans of buying 57 twin-engine fighter planes for the third aircraft carrier for which American F-18 and French Dassault Rafale are in the race.
“If one goes by the cost of the 36 Rafales acquired for the Air Force, the 57 planes are not going to cost us less than Rs 90,000-95,000 crore,” the sources said.
Citing the Chinese threat, the Navy had been asking for construction of the third nuclearpowered aircraft carrier using American technology and systems which is going to be far more expensive in comparison with the existing systems.
The Navy has been arguing that it should have one aircraft carrier each for the eastern and western sea boards with one aircraft carrier in reserve to take care of the time taken for refit and repair of any of the two carriers.
However, the defence ministry is not very keen on the project due to the high costs involved in it and it would force the government to change its acquisition plans for the coming years compelling it to wait list a number of other urgently required weapon systems of the Army and the Air Force, sources said.
The cost of equipment for the aircraft carrier take-off patented by an American private sector firm will also be a major factor in determining the final cost of the carrier for India, the sources said.
For buying the aircraft for the aircraft carrier, the Navy had floated a request for information (RFI) but it has not got any clearance from the defence ministry for issuing the tender for the project.
However, the Navy has already allowed the vendors to give it a presentation on whether their planes would be able to take off from the Russian-origin INS Vikramaditya or not. Defence ministry sources also said the need for further expanding the aircraft carrier fleet needs to be thought over again as all targets and routes in the Indian Ocean Region (IOR) can be looked after well by the existing assets and bases in the area.
Due to this reason, the defence ministry had refused to clear the five-year programme of the Navy as agreeing to it would required at least doubling the current acquisition budget of the ministry.
The government of India already spends 28 per cent of its total acquisition budget on fulfilling the requirements of the three services and increasing it to a higher level does not seem possible in the near future, sources said.

I am glad you presented this; it was timely.

You know my views on the subject of the parties that have administered India, and you know that I am not pro- any of those. But I have to say that Anthony has put a permanent crimp in our defence plans; it is almost impossible to catch up with the lost years and to get to the requisite level now.

Take the aircraft carrier question for a moment, as your reproduction is fresh and vivid in front of us. Given our strategic re-positioning, with a greater emphasis on the increasing Chinese presence in the Indian Ocean, and with continued concern about the security of the western seaboard and the economic assets in the Arabian Sea off Bombay, if, and it's a big IF, we continue to repose faith in carrier dominated naval warfare, and if we ignore for a moment the strategic importance of (a) the submarine arm; (b) the strategic component that is intended to be maintained underwater; (c) the immediate necessity of better guarding of the actual shores from attacks by irregulars; (d) the not-very-public work on creating an amphibious capability and the gradual working up of a marine corps, a carrier dominated strategy will need one carrier at sea on both the east and the west coast, at the minimum, and one carrier refitting or at base at all times to replace either of the two on patrol at very short notice. If the needs of addressing the Chinese presence off Africa is also factored in, we are looking at a third carrier task force, with its attendant surface ships, escort attack submarines and entire complement of planes.

Take also the factor of optimising carrier borne aerial assets; what we have is medium-small carriers with the capability of handling 30 to 40 aircraft at a time. That is neither fish, nor flesh nor good red herring; even a little thought will point to the need for completely independent attack and air supremacy requirements. Simultaneously. These carrier sizes that the Indian Navy is talking about and trying to sell to the government unfortunately is the optimal size for effective carriers, because carrying half the complement reduces the carrier's capability to a quarter of the larger size (factoring in turn around times and the need for frequent sorties, resultant casualties and wear and tear and the probability of defensive measures by hostile forces against the carriers.

Bottom line: we have two medium, even small-sized carriers, where the minimum we need to be effective and to achieve fair coverage of the naval fronts is four large carriers. In the extreme case, six, but that sounds completely beyond the capabilities of a regional sea power, such as India, that may aspire to be global in nature, but can only fill those very big boots over several iterations.

Unless the Navy changes its strategic asset mix, the straightforward model is unachievable today, largely due to cost, but also due to the need to ramp up enormously to meet the consumption of trained manpower by forces at those projected levels. This ramp up would involve not only ships, but crews, commanders, ordnance, on-shore maintenance bases, the capability of supply at sea, and close integration, to a degree not seen hitherto, of sensors and sensing equipment.

I hope you will agree that the Navy needs to re-think things, and to design an order of battle that will address affordability of the total number of assets in the mix, as well as the yawning gap between what it has to do and how it will do it.
 
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One crore is ten million rupees
Oh that I know. Just wondering 1.6 lakh = 160,000 ?

1.6 lakh crore = 10m X 160,000 = INR I.6tr

1.6tr / 63.35 = US$25.256bn?
 
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@khafee @WebMaster just some thing we were discussing a few days ago, Knowing how strong the US lobby is in India i have a feeling they may go with the F18.
The F/18 doesnt need anyone lobbying for it. It has proven itself since it came into existence and has participated in Iraq twice and it is already combat proven. Does India operates a US made platform as of now?
 
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The F/18 doesnt need anyone lobbying for it. It has proven itself since it came into existence and has participated in Iraq twice and it is already combat proven. Does India operates a US made platform as of now?
C130 and C17 , also m777 howitzers.
 
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Indian Navy Seeks Third Aircraft Carrier with 57 Fighter Planes Worth $25 Billion
January 16, 2018

insvikran_1516092488.jpg

Mig29K taking off

The India Navy is looking to acquire third aircraft carrier along with 57 foreign aircraft for the warship, amid growing Chinese threat, which will reportedly cost the government about US$25 billion (INR 1.6 lakh cr).

“The Navy is planning to field its Rs 70,000 crore proposal before the defence ministry in near future which will cost around Rs 1.6 lakh crore at the approval stage itself along with the fighter plane component and the actual costs will go higher further as the programme moves ahead,” government sources told Mail Today.

The Navy has plans of buying 57 twin-engine fighter planes for the third aircraft carrier for which American F-18 and French Dassault Rafale are in the race.

“If one goes by the cost of the 36 Rafales acquired for the Air Force, the 57 planes are not going to cost us less than Rs 90,000-95,000 crore,” the sources said.

However, the source said the Indian defense ministry is not that keen in green-lighting the proposal, due to the high costs involved in it and it would force the government to change its acquisition plans for the coming years compelling it to wait list a number of other urgently required weapon systems of the Army and the Air Force.

The cost of equipment for the aircraft carrier take-off patented by an American private sector firm will also be a major factor in determining the final cost of the carrier for India, the sources added.

At present, the Indian Navy has one operational aircraft carrier in the INS Vikramaditya while another one, INS Vikrant, is under construction at the Cochin Shipyard Limited (CSL) and is expected to join service in the next few years.

The Navy is also looking at options to further expand the existing aircraft carrier projects.

http://www.defenseworld.net/news/21763#.Wl9DHq6WbIV
 
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