South Korea Armed Forces

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#16
Republic of Korea Army investigators looking into an explosion at a military base in the southern South Korean city of Ulsan on 13 December have said that the blast started from piles of gunpowder discarded on the ground, according to Yonhap news agency.

The explosion seems to have occurred after gunpowder came into contact with soldiers' metal equipment, such as shovels, generating static electricity, Lieutenant Colonel Jung Yeong-ho was quoted as saying on 14 December.

At least 23 soldiers were injured in the explosion, which took place at a training camp for reservists.

http://www.janes.com/article/66243/...ed-to-explosion-at-south-korean-military-base
 

Sejong

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#18
The First Daegu Multi-Role Class Frigates. The Daegu is an improved variant of the Incheon Class frigates. These are made for anti-submarine missions and Air Defence missions.
Sensors: SLQ-200V ship borne electronic warfare system, LIG NEX1 SPS-550K 3D Radar and SQS-240 Sonar System
Armament: 1 Mk45 mod 4 naval gun, 1 RIM-116 SAM, 1 Phalanx CIWS, 8 Haeseong anti-ship missiles and 1 16 cell K-VLS for Cheolmae 2 SAM
Aircraft carried: 1 AW159 Wildcat helicopters
1.jpg
 
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#19
FFX-III won't come into service until 2020s
aahh, I see. thanks for info ^-^


The First Daegu Multi-Role Class Frigates. The Daegu is an improved variant of the Incheon Class frigates. These are made for anti-submarine missions and Air Defence missions.
Sensors: SLQ-200V ship borne electronic warfare system, LIG NEX1 SPS-550K 3D Radar and SQS-240 Sonar System
Armament: 1 Mk45 mod 4 naval gun, 1 RIM-116 SAM, 1 Phalanx CIWS, 8 Haeseong anti-ship missiles and 1 16 cell K-VLS for Cheolmae 2 SAM
Aircraft carried: 1 AW159 Wildcat helicopters
View attachment 3615
Let me adding its vids for this beauty <3>
 
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#20
The First Daegu Multi-Role Class Frigates. The Daegu is an improved variant of the Incheon Class frigates. These are made for anti-submarine missions and Air Defence missions.
Sensors: SLQ-200V ship borne electronic warfare system, LIG NEX1 SPS-550K 3D Radar and SQS-240 Sonar System
Armament: 1 Mk45 mod 4 naval gun, 1 RIM-116 SAM, 1 Phalanx CIWS, 8 Haeseong anti-ship missiles and 1 16 cell K-VLS for Cheolmae 2 SAM
Aircraft carried: 1 AW159 Wildcat helicopters
View attachment 3615
pretty jealous, congrats brother, I hope South Korea continues they good work on equipment and hope more cooperation between Turkey and South Korea happens.
 
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#22
ROK Navy Future ASR-II Submarine Rescue Vessel Passes Capability Test

South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) has announced that the design of the ASR-II project passed the military's required operational capability (ROC) test last month. ASR-II is a new generation Auxiliary Submarine Rescue vessel intended to strengthen the existing Cheonghaejin Class ASR submarine rescue ship as the Republic of Korea (ROK) Navy has commissioned nine KSS-II class submarines (Type 214) as well as building the new class of large submarine, the KSS-III.

Image: DAPA


DAPA launched the ASR-II project in November 2015 in partnership with Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME). They have focused on the basic design of the 5,200-ton ship capable of conducting submarine crew rescue operations amid waves as tall as four meters.

Its missions include rescuing trapped sailors in submarines, naval operation support for submarines, underwater research and mapping support, and recovery of sunk vessels. It is equipped with a Deep Submergence Rescue Vehicle (DSRV) that operates up to 500 meters, and a rescue chamber that can accomodate up to 9 people. The 4,300 tons Cheonghaejin was commissioned in December 1996.


Image: DAPA


According to the DAPA press release, the ASR-II is fitted with a "Center Well", which is an "advanced technology' to launch and recover deap sea rescue submarines (DSRV) through a vertical opening right in the middle of the vessel. The advantage of this method is that is possible to rescue the crew of a distressed submarine 500 meters deep, despite waves of 4 meters.

In addition the vessel is capable of supporting deep sea exploration as well as refuel and maintain submarines at sea.

The ROK Navy's Cheonghaejin class ASR-I has two proven records of salvaging sunken naval submarine and semi-submersible, both belonging to North Korea:
- In 1998, the ASR-I successfully salvaged a North Korean Yugo class submarine in Sokcho when it sunk while being towed to port.
- In 1999, the ASR-I again salvaged a North Korean Taedong class semi-submersible in Yeosu, when it was destroyed in an engagement with the ROK Navy. The salvaged boat is the widely publicized one on display in Yeosu's Naval Museum.

https://www.navyrecognition.com/ind...ine-rescue-vessel-passes-capability-test.html
 

Khafee

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#23
Report: S. Korea and U.S. military drills are not a diplomatic tool
By Jennie Oh | Dec. 27, 2017


SEOUL, South Korea(UPI) -- South Korea and the United States must not scale back on joint military drills as a means to appease North Korea, according to former U.S. commanders in Korea who spoke to the Voice of America on Tuesday.

This comes amid uncertainty on whether the allied forces will put off an annual military drill to avoid an overlap with the Pyeongchang Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games from February to March.

President Moon Jae In reportedly requested the delay in a bid to ease security concerns and tensions with North Korea during the global sporting event.

Burwell B. Bell, a retired four star U.S. army general, said postponing the drill is a "legitimate issue" as "it's not good to be conducting military exercises when bringing in hundreds, even thousands of athletes from over a hundred countries around the world."

However, he said the exercises must be conducted to their "full requirements" immediately following the Games.

While the drills may be rescheduled to accommodate practical concerns surrounding the Olympics, Bell said that military readiness should not be used as a diplomatic tool to bargain with North Korea.

"My strongest recommendation has always been if either side ever chooses to use military readiness as a bargaining chip that that would be a time when the United States should turn away from this alliance because it is too dangerous for our forces and it also shows a lack of confidence by the South Koreans," he said.

Bell led the United Nations Command, the Combined Forces Command and U.S. Forces Korea from 2006 to 2008.

General James Thurman who commanded the forces from 2011 to 2013, agreed that the joint war games are nonnegotiable and remain a crucial means of maintaining military readiness.

"We must be careful appeasing North Korea. It has never worked and I do not think cutting deals with them will be effective.The alliance must remain strong and vigilant," he said.

The annual war games, called Key Resolve and Foal Eagle, usually begin in late February or early March.

North Korea has long regarded the drills as a rehearsal for invasion and an excuse to launch provocations.
https://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-...re-not-a-diplomatic-tool/6121514357069/?nll=1
 
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#24
http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zon...korea-eye-f-35b-for-their-helicopter-carriers

Japan And South Korea Eye F-35B For Their Helicopter Carriers

The news comes as little surprise, especially for Japan, whose hulking Izumoclass "helicopter destroyers" have always been peculiarly outsized for their mission set and it's not as if Tokyo hasn't had its eye on such a capability for some time.


AP

Izumo and Kaga, Japan's largest fighting ships that could potentially accommodate the F-35B.

South Korea's interest in the F-35B also isn't that shocking. The country's first amphibious flattop, the Dokdo, is smaller than Japan's Izumo class and it isn't clear exactly how capable the vessel would be of sustaining F-35B operations without a major refit. A second and updated variant of the Dokdo design is now under construction. That vessel could possibly be modified so that it could handle a small cadre of F-35Bs in the future.


USN

ROKS Dokto (LPD-6111) seen operating alongside its US counterparts.

Beyond the general dimensional requirements needed to house and operate the F-35B, other vessel-impact issues have to be taken into account as well. The aircraft's powerful and hot exhaust can severely damage a ship's deck unless it is specifically reinforced and coated with special materials. That same blast of hot and powerful gas can do damage anywhere on the ship it may pass over. So everything from catwalks, emergency life rafts, communications aerials, sensors, navigational aids, and other fixtures would need to be reinforced or relocated entirely.


LOCKHEED MARTIN

The addition of a ski-jump is not necessary although it would improve the F-35B's takeoff performance and add an extra margin of safety. The Izumo class, which presently includes two ships, was already designed with the F-35 and V-22 in mind to some degree, and its rear elevator and expansive hangar space can already facilitate movement of either type. Japan has already ordered the Osprey and that aircraft could be a huge force multiplier for shipboard F-35B operations.

For either country, and for their own reasons, the F-35B could also offer the ability to execute highly dispersed operations independent of massive runways that will be at the top of an enemy's target list during a conflict (aka ballistic and cruise missile sponges). The F-35B can operate from small strips and reinforced concrete roadways during a time of war. In South Korea the demand for such a capability is extremely obvious as the country's airports will be the top targets for North Korean missiles and special operations forces during a conflict. Japan, an island nation, could use the F-35B to disperse top-of-the-line air combat capability to remote and austere locations. This could be especially useful in the defense of the country's southern most islands.


AP

Just part of Izumo's massive hangar deck

There may also be an opportunity for either country in the form of America's soon to be surplus AV-8B Harriers. The Harrier is more compact and lighter than the F-35B that is replacing it, and its exhaust does not present the same compatibility challenges either. Obtaining a small fleet of these aircraft and introducing shipboard STOVL operations would be a far less expensive proposition as well. Turkey is presently going down this exact path.


SOUTH KOREAN GOVERNNMENT

The Dokdo's configuration.

Going the AV-8B route could be especially attractive option for South Korea, whose smaller helicopter harriers are better suited for the design and are more focused on amphibious operations in North Korea.


USN

A SH-60 landing aboard ROKS Dokto (LPD-6111).

If Japan chooses to go down the STOVL route for its Izumo class carriers, it would mark the first time since 1945 that the country has had an operational aircraft carrier capable of fielding fixed-wing aircraft. It would also be among the most glaring diversions from Article Nine of the country's constitution that drastically limits its offensive warfare capabilities.

Japan has gone out of its way to refer to the big Izumo class carriers, and their Hyuga class predecessors, as "helicopter destroyers" because of this issue. But there is no doubt that Japan's military stature has began to morph in recent years, and especially over the last year, as the threat posed by North Korea has grown significantly. Tokyo's emerging hunt for long-range cruise missiles is just another indication of this monumental strategic shift.

This hotly debated change has largely occurred piecemeal, but supposedly Japan will officially address the legality of these changes and its overall strategic aim in its upcoming National Defense Program Guidelines, which is supposed to be published sometime next year.


LOCKHEED MARTIN

F-35B with a full external load-out operating from the boat.

It would be a good move for either country to procure the F-35B, or used Harriers, for shipboard or dispersed operations. As I have discussed in great detailed over the years, the F-35 A and C models' design was impacted negatively on virtually all levels to accommodate the B model's STOVL requirement. With that in mind, by purchasing even small numbers of B models, operators of the A variant can achieve the benefits of the B model's unique capabilities to offset the performance sacrifices paid by their A model fleet.

This may seem like somewhat of an abstract concept but it is a key argument for the jet when it comes to its Pentagon service. The B model, which will only make up roughly 15 percent of the entire F-35 production run, but has penalized the rest of the fleet due to the design compromises it inflicted, is giving America's total force basically double the number of 5th generation fighter carrying "first day of war" aircraft carriers than it had prior. The B model also offers the potential for highly dispersed operations in areas where traditional stealth fighter aircraft would likely be unable to operate. This capability will develop over time but it would be highly prized during a peer-state conflict in vast and very dangerous Pacific theater.


AP

Izumo docking.

Both South Korea and Japan could also leverage some of these same synergies and benefits by retooling the ships they already have even for low density F-35B operations, or by taking advantage of cheap Harriers with lots of life left in them that will be put on the auction block due to the F-35B entering widespread service with the USMC. Either way, these countries will benefit from the existence of the F-35B.

If Japan and/or South Korea move ahead with fielding the F-35B, Australia would likely follow suit as they have a pair of ships that are even better prepared to operate the stealthy strike-fighters—the Canberra class landing helicopter docks. These vessels are license-built iterations of Spain's proven Juan Carlos class design and were constructed with ski-jumps for operating STOVL jets even though the Royal Australian Navy said they had no intention of procuring them at the time.


USN

HMAS Canberra.

Now that Australia is set to receive a large fleet of F-35As (72 aircraft planned and that number could grow), introducing the F-35B to their already owned and operated carriers seems almost inevitable. Once again, the Harrier could also be an option here as well, but seeing as the country is a major F-35 customer already, and is set to remodel their entire air combat capability, going for the latest and greatest option seems more likely.

All this is happening as China and India work to rapidly build-up their own fixed-wing aircraft carrier capacity. With this in mind, the coming decade could see the strategic naval balance in the Pacific region being heavily dictated by whose carrier strike groups can do what and where.
 

Khafee

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#25
S. Korea's Marine Corps gets first multirole choppers

SEOUL, Jan. 10 (Yonhap) -- South Korea's Marine Corps received the first two multirole helicopters from the country's arms agency Wednesday, moving a step toward its aim of creating an independent aviation unit.

The MUH-1s, the Marine version of the KUH-1 Surion developed by Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI), represent the first major aircraft possessed by the 28,800-strong troops since they were integrated into the Navy in 1973.

The Marine Corps has since relied on the assets of the Navy, the Army and the Air Force to transport its service members and equipment.

The MUH-1 has been nicknamed Marineon, a combination of the words Marine and Surion.

They will be used for various missions, including the defense of strategic islands, rapid response and humanitarian operations, said the unit.

It has already trained 40 pilots and 40 maintenance staff members amid efforts to introduce attack choppers and launch a Marine Corps aviation team in 2021.

AEN20180110001500315_01_i.jpg

South Korean Marine Corps' MUH-1 multirole helicopters in a photo provided by the unit (Yonhap)

"We have gained a new pair of wings again after 45 years amid the people's trust and expectations," Marine Corps Commandant Lt. Gen. Jun Jin-goo said at the delivery ceremony held at the 1st Division in Pohang, attended by more than 100 other dignitaries.

He added it will help the Marine Corps beef up its operation capabilities, not only on the ground but also in the air.

The 19-meter-long, 3.5-meter-wide MUH-1 can carry up to nine troops, flying for more than three hours with a supplementary fuel tank installed.

http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/northkorea/2018/01/10/0401000000AEN20180110001500315.html