US submarine hits underwater object in South China Sea | World Defense

US submarine hits underwater object in South China Sea

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US submarine hits underwater object in South China Sea


A US nuclear powered submarine struck an object underwater in the South China Sea on Saturday, according to two defense officials.
A number of sailors on board the USS Connecticut were injured in the accident, the officials said. None of the injuries were life-threatening, according to a statement from US Pacific Fleet. It's unclear what the Seawolf-class submarine may have hit while it was submerged.
"The submarine remains in a safe and stable condition. USS Connecticut's nuclear propulsion plant and spaces were not affected and remain fully operational," the statement said. "The incident will be investigated." The US Navy did not specify the incident took place in the South China Sea, only that it occurred in international waters in the Indo-Pacific region.
The accident happened as tensions between the US and China soared over the Chinese military's incursions into Taiwan's Air Defense Integration Zone (ADIZ).
 

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Timing is interesting. US gives Australia nuclear sub tech, and a few days later, one of their nuclear subs gets checked around Chinese waters.
 

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Attack Submarine USS Connecticut Suffers Underwater Collision in South China Sea​

By: Sam LaGrone
October 7, 2021 2:38 PM • Updated: October 7, 2021 3:51 PM

This post has been updated with additional details on the injuries to the crew of USS Connecticut and the location of the collision.

Almost a dozen sailors have been injured after a U.S. nuclear attack submarine hit an unknown underwater object in the South China Sea, USNI News has learned.

The Seawolf-class nuclear attack submarine USS Connecticut (SSN-22) suffered an underwater collision while operating in international waters on Oct. 2 and is returning to port in U.S. 7th Fleet, a U.S. Pacific Fleet spokesman confirmed to USNI News on Thursday.

“The Seawolf-class fast-attack submarine USS Connecticut (SSN-22) struck an object while submerged on the afternoon of Oct. 2, while operating in international waters in the Indo-Pacific region. The safety of the crew remains the Navy’s top priority. There are no life-threatening injuries,” Capt. Bill Clinton told USNI News.

The submarine remains in a safe and stable condition. USS Connecticut’s nuclear propulsion plant and spaces were not affected and remain fully operational. The extent of damage to the remainder of the submarine is being assessed. The U.S. Navy has not requested assistance. The incident will be investigated.”

A defense official told USNI News about 11 sailors were hurt in the incident with moderate to minor injuries. The attack boat is now headed to Guam and is expected to pull in within the next day, the official said. The underwater strike occurred in the South China Sea and the attack boat has been making its way to Guam on the surface since Saturday, a defense official confirmed to USNI News.

The Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton, Wash., based submarine deployed on May 27 for the Pacific, the Navy announced at the time. The service has released photographs of the submarine operating in the Western Pacific with port calls in Japan in late July and August. U.S. 7th Fleet commander Adm. Karl Thomas visited the submarine in August, according to the service.

Connecticut is one of three Sea Wolf-class boats, a late Cold War attack submarine designed to hunt the most complex Soviet submarines in deep blue water. Along with USS Sea Wolf (SSN-21) and USS Jimmy Carter (SSN-23), Connecticut is among the Navy’s most capable and sensitive attack boats.

The last known instance where a submerged U.S. submarine struck another underwater object was in 2005. Then, USS San Franciso (SSN -711) struck an underwater mountain at full speed near Guam. One sailor died in the incident.

The following is the complete Oct. 7 statement from Pacific Fleet.

The Seawolf-class fast-attack submarine USS Connecticut (SSN 22) struck an object while submerged on the afternoon of Oct. 2, while operating in international waters in the Indo-Pacific region. The safety of the crew remains the Navy’s top priority. There are no life-threatening injuries.

The submarine remains in a safe and stable condition. USS Connecticut’s nuclear propulsion plant and spaces were not affected and remain fully operational. The extent of damage to the remainder of the submarine is being assessed. The U.S. Navy has not requested assistance. The incident will be investigated.”

 

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FBH_gnwWUAkwNGh
 

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Timing is interesting. US gives Australia nuclear sub tech, and a few days later, one of their nuclear subs gets checked around Chinese waters.
These sort of incidents usually happen when the sonar gets overwhelmed or navigational error, or both.
All of the above, considering the fact that the collision happened with an underwater fixed object, if it was an underwater vessel, which in my opinion is "very likely", then other factors would come into play.


@GRANNY001 your views?
 

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Hi Khafee. Agree with most what you have said. The sonar sets getting "overwhelmed" as you have said could be a good possibility, but I can't go along with you WRT "navigational error". That should and would never happen under any circumstances. With GPS and other navigational and other satellite systems, along with WSM management requirements, I cannot see a blue on blue submarine "bump". Therefore I have to assume it was another "non-allied" submarine following too closely that may have caused this "incident". Who it was, I will leave up to your imagination 9possibly the "Big Red Guys".>>_*
 

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Hi Khafee. Agree with most what you have said. The sonar sets getting "overwhelmed" as you have said could be a good possibility, but I can't go along with you WRT "navigational error". That should and would never happen under any circumstances. With GPS and other navigational and other satellite systems, along with WSM management requirements, I cannot see a blue on blue submarine "bump". Therefore I have to assume it was another "non-allied" submarine following too closely that may have caused this "incident". Who it was, I will leave up to your imagination 9possibly the "Big Red Guys".>>_*
Ivan has a habit of popping up when least expected. Secondly, have you identified the "area of interest" in question?
 

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Seems most likely a human error.
Not impossible, but given the level of training, and built in safety systems, very shocking.
 
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