Amazon's Bezos unveils Blue Moon lunar lander | World Defense

Amazon's Bezos unveils Blue Moon lunar lander

Khafee

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,753
Reactions
5,914 263
Amazon's Bezos unveils Blue Moon lunar lander

Contraption to be used to transport equipment, possibly humans to Moon by 2024
Published: May 10, 2019 02:27AFP

190510 Blue Moon

Founder, Chairman, CEO and President of Amazon Jeff Bezos unveils his space company Blue Origin's space exploration lunar lander rocket called Blue Moon.Image Credit: Reuters

Washington: Jeff Bezos, who heads both Amazon and space company Blue Origin, unveiled on Thursday a lunar lander that he said would be used to transport equipment, and possibly human beings, to the south pole of the Moon by 2024.

“This is Blue Moon,” he said at a presentation in Washington, as curtains lifted to show a mock-up of a huge vessel weighing many tons and able to carry four self-driving rovers.

“It’s an incredible vehicle, and it will go to the Moon,” he declared.

The vehicle has been under development for the past three years, he said. It will be capable of carrying scientific instruments and also rovers for humans.

The goal is to land on the Moon’s south pole, where there is ice. Water can be exploited to produce hydrogen, which in turn could fuel future exploration of the solar system.

Bezos didn’t announce a specific date for the project’s first launch, but said the lander would be in ready in time to make President Donald Trump’s announced timeline to return people to the Moon by 2024.

“We can help make that timeline, but only because we started three years ago,” he said. “It’s time to go back to the Moon, this time to stay.”

 

Khafee

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,753
Reactions
5,914 263
Blue Origin's moon deal with Lockheed, other firms, signals new era
By Paul Brinkmann

Blue-Origins-moon-deal-with-Lockheed-other-firms-signals-new-era - Copy.jpg

Amazon and Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos (R) announced Tuesday a new partnership of companies to mount a lunar landing mission. Photo courtesy of Blue Origin


(UPI) -- Blue Origin announced Tuesday a new partnership with old-guard aerospace firms Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and Draper to land on the moon -- signalling a new era in U.S. space exploration.

Until now, Blue Origin functioned as a standalone startup, funded by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos' billions. It was seen chiefly as a competitor to new space companies like SpaceX.

With Tuesday's announcement, Blue Origin leads a team in NASA's aggressive plan to return people to the moon by 2024, and to establish a moon base. The partnership and the new moon contract will test NASA's recent strategy to privatize as much as possible.

"We'll be working alongside NASA and providing the service to them," said Rob Chambers, director of strategy for human spaceflight at Lockheed. "It's a closer partnership with NASA and spreads responsibility more evenly."

Chambers said the team represents the "best athletes" for different parts of the trip, like the legs of a relay race at a track event.
As the shuttle program ended in 2011, NASA began moving toward a more commercialized model.

"NASA now tells us what they want, rather than how they want it," Chambers said.

SpaceX continues to pursue its own next-generation rocket and spaceship, the Starship, which will have a built-in habitat. SpaceX founder Elon Musk has said Starship will carry people to the moon in a matter of years.

SpaceX didn't respond immediately to questions Tuesday about whether it plans to compete with Blue Origin's team for the NASA contract.

Blue Origin said it will build the descent module -- it's Blue Moon lander -- that will be stacked with other modules. It also will lead program management along with systems and mission engineering.Northrop will build a transfer module that will guide the Blue Moon from NASA's planned lunar gateway that will orbit the moon.

Lockheed will build a reusable ascent module that will launch back into space from the lunar surface. Lockheed also will lead crewed flight operations and training. Lockheed built NASA's Orion capsule, which is an alternative vehicle that still might be used in lunar missions.
Draper will lead descent guidance and provide flight avionics.

Of the giants in defense and space contracting, Boeing was noticeably missing from Blue Origin's team. Boeing, like SpaceX, is in the midst of testing its own crewed capsule for missions to the International Space Station.

Chambers said the Blue Origin team will pursue the cooperative approach dictated by NASA for the so-called Artemis lunar missions -- requiring that designs be made public for any parts or systems that interface with the gateway and other modules. However, he said internal components of each module can still be proprietary.

Draper noted in an announcement that it provided navigation systems for Apollo missions 50 years ago, which helped avoid hazards such as boulders, slopes and uneven surfaces.

"Draper occupies a special position within the space ecosystem that gives the company deep expertise in what's required-and how to deliver-commercial technologies that will perform in space," said Seamus Tuohy, principal director of space systems at Draper.
 

TomCat

MEMBER
Joined
Oct 11, 2019
Messages
477
Reactions
596 10
Country
Pakistan
Location
United Arab Emirates
Blue Origin's moon deal with Lockheed, other firms, signals new era
By Paul Brinkmann

View attachment 11480
Amazon and Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos (R) announced Tuesday a new partnership of companies to mount a lunar landing mission. Photo courtesy of Blue Origin


(UPI) -- Blue Origin announced Tuesday a new partnership with old-guard aerospace firms Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and Draper to land on the moon -- signalling a new era in U.S. space exploration.

Until now, Blue Origin functioned as a standalone startup, funded by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos' billions. It was seen chiefly as a competitor to new space companies like SpaceX.

With Tuesday's announcement, Blue Origin leads a team in NASA's aggressive plan to return people to the moon by 2024, and to establish a moon base. The partnership and the new moon contract will test NASA's recent strategy to privatize as much as possible.

"We'll be working alongside NASA and providing the service to them," said Rob Chambers, director of strategy for human spaceflight at Lockheed. "It's a closer partnership with NASA and spreads responsibility more evenly."

Chambers said the team represents the "best athletes" for different parts of the trip, like the legs of a relay race at a track event.
As the shuttle program ended in 2011, NASA began moving toward a more commercialized model.

"NASA now tells us what they want, rather than how they want it," Chambers said.

SpaceX continues to pursue its own next-generation rocket and spaceship, the Starship, which will have a built-in habitat. SpaceX founder Elon Musk has said Starship will carry people to the moon in a matter of years.

SpaceX didn't respond immediately to questions Tuesday about whether it plans to compete with Blue Origin's team for the NASA contract.

Blue Origin said it will build the descent module -- it's Blue Moon lander -- that will be stacked with other modules. It also will lead program management along with systems and mission engineering.Northrop will build a transfer module that will guide the Blue Moon from NASA's planned lunar gateway that will orbit the moon.

Lockheed will build a reusable ascent module that will launch back into space from the lunar surface. Lockheed also will lead crewed flight operations and training. Lockheed built NASA's Orion capsule, which is an alternative vehicle that still might be used in lunar missions.
Draper will lead descent guidance and provide flight avionics.

Of the giants in defense and space contracting, Boeing was noticeably missing from Blue Origin's team. Boeing, like SpaceX, is in the midst of testing its own crewed capsule for missions to the International Space Station.

Chambers said the Blue Origin team will pursue the cooperative approach dictated by NASA for the so-called Artemis lunar missions -- requiring that designs be made public for any parts or systems that interface with the gateway and other modules. However, he said internal components of each module can still be proprietary.

Draper noted in an announcement that it provided navigation systems for Apollo missions 50 years ago, which helped avoid hazards such as boulders, slopes and uneven surfaces.

"Draper occupies a special position within the space ecosystem that gives the company deep expertise in what's required-and how to deliver-commercial technologies that will perform in space," said Seamus Tuohy, principal director of space systems at Draper.
Imagine something like this,
Watch from 3:30 to be specific, this type of tech had been considered and apparently scrapped by usa due to it's massive cost crossing $40+bn

1572046468530.png
 
Top