Analysis: Nigeria reportedly takes delivery of 'Super Hinds'

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Analysis: Nigeria reportedly takes delivery of 'Super Hinds'


An ATE-upgraded Mi-24 photographed in 2008. The helicopter in the Beegeagle's Blog photograph has been fitted a very similar new nose section to accommodate the same 20 mm gun and an electro-optic turret. Source: IHS / Patrick Allen
Key Points
  • Nigeria has reportedly acquired two upgraded Mi-24 'Super Hind' attack helicopters
  • The upgrade appears to have been carried out in Ukraine, not by a South African company as claimed
Nigeria is so desperate for attack helicopters to support counter-insurgency operations that it has ordered new Mil Mi-35Ms from Russia; bought at least one more used Mi-24 from Ukraine, tried - and failed - to acquire surplus Bell AH-1 Cobras; and has recently taken delivery of two Mi-35Ps that have been upgraded into 'Super Hinds' by a South African company, according to a Nigerian defence blog.

The Beegeagle's Blog supported its claim by publishing a photograph on 2 January showing two Mi-24/35 helicopters, one of which had clearly been upgraded. However, no country markings can be seen on the aircraft and their two-tone desert camouflage is similar to one used by several air forces, including Nigeria's.

The upgrade consists of a reconfigured nose section to accommodate a new 20 mm gun (either a Nexter M693/F2 or the version license-built by South Africa's Denel) and an electro-optical turret: a very similar package to the one that South Africa's Advanced Technologies and Engineering (ATE) fitted to Algeria Mi-24s around the turn of the century.

Designed to improve the helicopter's firepower and ability to operate at night and in adverse weather conditions, the ATE upgrade also included new avionics and the integration of Denel Ingwe laser-guided missiles.

However, the Paramount Group, which took over ATE in 2013 and renamed it Paramount Advanced Technologies, told IHS Jane's that it has not been involved in upgrading any helicopters for Nigeria.

Footage broadcast on Ukraine's Sumy TV in October 2014 prompted speculation that the upgrade was carried out in that country rather than South Africa. It showed a Mi-24 fitted with the same nose section being worked on at Ukraine's Konotop Aircraft Repair Plant.

Meanwhile, Ukraine's Izyum Instrument Plant has suggested that it might be providing optics for the upgraded helicopters by using a photograph of one of the ATE Mi-24s next to an image of its PN-B laser designator. The ATE version was fitted with a Denel Optronics Argos electro-optical system.

The PN-B could be used in conjunction with Ukrainian-made weapons, such as the Bar'er-V anti-tank missile or AR-8L guided rocket.

Nigeria's apparent acquisition of at least one unmodified Ukrainian Mi-24 was revealed by a photography taken by an aviation enthusiast near Kiev in December. It showed a Mi-24 with a Nigerian Air Force roundel and the previously unseen serial number NAF 261 in flight.

A Russian military-diplomatic source told IHS Jane's in September 2014 that Nigeria has ordered six Mi-35Ms, as well as 12 Mi-171Sh transport helicopters.

The State Department confirmed in November that the United States had blocked the transfer of AH-1 Cobras to Nigeria due to concerns that about the Nigeria military's ability to maintain the helicopters and its human rights record. A Nigerian newspaper reported that the helicopters would have come from Israel, which retired its last AH-1s in 2013 for budgetary reasons.

The only Nigerian attack helicopter acquisitions reported to the UN Register of Conventional Arms in the last decade were three Mi-24s from Ukraine in 2008 and two more from Belarus in 2010.
Analysis: Nigeria reportedly takes delivery of 'Super Hinds' - IHS Jane's 360
 
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I'm not sure if this is really the best way to spend money on defense. If the government can't take control of a guerrilla outfit like Boko Haram, they seem to be misplaced with a focus on spending on airforce upgrades.
 
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It is amazing how much money goes into arms in each country and the expense and lives taken are for nothing because when they are at war with the high tech arms somebody loses their life anyway. We should disarm each country and see what happens.
 
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Analysis: Nigeria reportedly takes delivery of 'Super Hinds'


An ATE-upgraded Mi-24 photographed in 2008. The helicopter in the Beegeagle's Blog photograph has been fitted a very similar new nose section to accommodate the same 20 mm gun and an electro-optic turret. Source: IHS / Patrick Allen
Key Points
  • Nigeria has reportedly acquired two upgraded Mi-24 'Super Hind' attack helicopters
  • The upgrade appears to have been carried out in Ukraine, not by a South African company as claimed
Nigeria is so desperate for attack helicopters to support counter-insurgency operations that it has ordered new Mil Mi-35Ms from Russia; bought at least one more used Mi-24 from Ukraine, tried - and failed - to acquire surplus Bell AH-1 Cobras; and has recently taken delivery of two Mi-35Ps that have been upgraded into 'Super Hinds' by a South African company, according to a Nigerian defence blog.

The Beegeagle's Blog supported its claim by publishing a photograph on 2 January showing two Mi-24/35 helicopters, one of which had clearly been upgraded. However, no country markings can be seen on the aircraft and their two-tone desert camouflage is similar to one used by several air forces, including Nigeria's.

The upgrade consists of a reconfigured nose section to accommodate a new 20 mm gun (either a Nexter M693/F2 or the version license-built by South Africa's Denel) and an electro-optical turret: a very similar package to the one that South Africa's Advanced Technologies and Engineering (ATE) fitted to Algeria Mi-24s around the turn of the century.

Designed to improve the helicopter's firepower and ability to operate at night and in adverse weather conditions, the ATE upgrade also included new avionics and the integration of Denel Ingwe laser-guided missiles.

However, the Paramount Group, which took over ATE in 2013 and renamed it Paramount Advanced Technologies, told IHS Jane's that it has not been involved in upgrading any helicopters for Nigeria.

Footage broadcast on Ukraine's Sumy TV in October 2014 prompted speculation that the upgrade was carried out in that country rather than South Africa. It showed a Mi-24 fitted with the same nose section being worked on at Ukraine's Konotop Aircraft Repair Plant.

Meanwhile, Ukraine's Izyum Instrument Plant has suggested that it might be providing optics for the upgraded helicopters by using a photograph of one of the ATE Mi-24s next to an image of its PN-B laser designator. The ATE version was fitted with a Denel Optronics Argos electro-optical system.

The PN-B could be used in conjunction with Ukrainian-made weapons, such as the Bar'er-V anti-tank missile or AR-8L guided rocket.

Nigeria's apparent acquisition of at least one unmodified Ukrainian Mi-24 was revealed by a photography taken by an aviation enthusiast near Kiev in December. It showed a Mi-24 with a Nigerian Air Force roundel and the previously unseen serial number NAF 261 in flight.

A Russian military-diplomatic source told IHS Jane's in September 2014 that Nigeria has ordered six Mi-35Ms, as well as 12 Mi-171Sh transport helicopters.

The State Department confirmed in November that the United States had blocked the transfer of AH-1 Cobras to Nigeria due to concerns that about the Nigeria military's ability to maintain the helicopters and its human rights record. A Nigerian newspaper reported that the helicopters would have come from Israel, which retired its last AH-1s in 2013 for budgetary reasons.

The only Nigerian attack helicopter acquisitions reported to the UN Register of Conventional Arms in the last decade were three Mi-24s from Ukraine in 2008 and two more from Belarus in 2010.
Analysis: Nigeria reportedly takes delivery of 'Super Hinds' - IHS Jane's 360
I think Nigeria has bigger problem to solve then spending money on aircrafts. Is the Nigerian military even properly trained to use these helicopters? I think they are just loading up on equipment for a rainy day, but I'm sure there is more to the story.
 
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Nigeria needs to, provide job opportunities for the people and make sure people have good employment opportunities and work is available for everyone and education is there for the children. Government needs to fight off the rebels or have some control over them otherwise problems will arise later and people will turn to these groups thinking they are heroes and not rebels. I hope, the money is used wisely, if the economy there is barely coping than it is important to do what is important and that is meeting the needs of human life and kids there.
 
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I would like to know how a country that is poor can afford to get these kind of machines and weaponery! The people there are starving and the westerners moved in to invest in the country so I ask you, how did they get the money to buy this? US or China? And what was traded for the deal to take place!
 
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