Can a state withdraw from the EU ?

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The EU has a central currency and trade agreements. Can a state withdraw from the EU ? If they decide to withdraw how will they deal with the common currency ? Would they somehow turn in thier currency ?

Has the EU taken this into account ?
 
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Yep, there's an express provision for that. Although since inception, no state has withdrawn from EU yet, if they do leave, they're free to do so. In effect, the state that withdrew will no longer benefit from the treaty not more than two years from the date of notification. The council may extend this period, however. The state may also opt to rejoin the EU but it has to start from scratch and be re-assessed again. You can read the withdrawal clause here.
 
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Yes it can and they can also rejoin. But if they choose to rejoin they will have to start from scratch.
 
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Not all countries have the Euro, mainly the UK and trade agreements exist with European countries that are not part of the EU. Trade agreements would continue as they did before the EEC at the time, but exiting the Euro maybe trickier. It would take planning and given that countries like Greece haven't go much to lose anyway, it maybe an option later on.
Exiting would indicate that the EU is a failure, which is why it is frowned upon, but states can leave and given recent events in Greece, momentum is building up so that states are feeling the need to leave for political and economic reasons.
 
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Sovereign states can certainly leave the EU if they so wish. However, the reality of it is a lot more complicated. Entering the EU is associated with a myriad of different agreements, particularly regarding economics. Having been a part of the EU, leaving it may be impractical due to pre-existing economical agreements and ties.
 
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Exiting would indicate that the EU is a failure, which is why it is frowned upon, but states can leave and given recent events in Greece, momentum is building up so that states are feeling the need to leave for political and economic reasons.
People would see it means the EU is a failure. I would say it is just being practical. In the case of Greece, they are not economically equal to many of the other member states. Also from the other side of the coin, Germany is doing well economically, but they feel that countries like Spain and Greece are dragging them down.
 
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Yep, there's an express provision for that. Although since inception, no state has withdrawn from EU yet, if they do leave, they're free to do so. In effect, the state that withdrew will no longer benefit from the treaty not more than two years from the date of notification. The council may extend this period, however. The state may also opt to rejoin the EU but it has to start from scratch and be re-assessed again. You can read the withdrawal clause here.
Is there a clause that member states can be kicked out of the EU for failing to meet the economic requirements. In the case of Greece and Spain, I think it is unrealistic for them to be able to meet these requirements. In the past both countries have failed to meet the percentage of debt allowed. Since they do not have an independent currency it is more difficult for them to set interest rates, allow their currencies to float etc.
 
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Pretty much ALL of the EU governments are falling behind on the debt/GDP requirement. The EU will not be kicking anyone out because of this, it just isn't something these politicians would do as it would show how incapable the EU is.

I also highly doubt any country wants to exit the EU. In that case trade with the other EU countries would become harder and quite frankly I don't think the EU would be very willing on doing many trade agreements as very bad conditions for a country that left the EU would act as a deterrent for other countries to do the same. Exiting the euro is another matter and it could work out well for some countries as it would give their central bank a lot more flexibility.
 
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Is there a clause that member states can be kicked out of the EU for failing to meet the economic requirements. In the case of Greece and Spain, I think it is unrealistic for them to be able to meet these requirements. In the past both countries have failed to meet the percentage of debt allowed. Since they do not have an independent currency it is more difficult for them to set interest rates, allow their currencies to float etc.
From the current treaties it would have to be drastic and put to a vote and not based solely on economics. It would have to be resistance to change and comply with EU laws and refusing to enforce things that the EU states are policy, for example if a state challenges the EU on a point of law and doesn't wish to adopt it or ignores it. From what is seems, Greece and Spain feel helpless and stuck with the EU for life, indebted to them, so it will be hard to stand on their own again. It's possible this could happen to more countries though as the model is only working for Germany.
 
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There's no protocol established for the case when a country wants to pull out because everyone assumed once you're in you're in for good. I guess a country could pull out if they wanted to but they'd then have to negotiate some trade deal like the EU has with Switzerland or Norway.
 
#11

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It is possible but currently unlikely. The cons outweigh the pros and it would be quite an arduous and difficult process. However there is talk in the UK about leaving the EU, mainly from UKIP, and it is possible in the semi distant future that Britain could leave the EU. However in my personal opinion i think that this would be a bad move.
 
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I think a country can really withdraw, but they would have to face and even suffer the consequences. Of course, it's not going to be easy at all politically and economically speaking. There would have to be intense and drastic adjustments that would have to be done. People of that country might suffer also while the government is trying to stabilise their country again.
 
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Of course. Any state can retract from the EU at any time if they wish. For most states, the EU provides quite a few benefits and so leaving it would not be the best idea. There is actually a very big debate here in the UK over whether we should leave the EU.
 

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