Canada's F18 replacement news & updates

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Canada to kill Boeing Super Hornet deal
By: Valerie Insinna
06.12.2017

WASHINGTON — The Canadian government is poised to walk away from a deal with Boeing to buy 18 F/A-18E/F Super Hornet jets, a major blow for the future of the Boeing jet.

Canada’s Liberal government will announce next week plans to proceed with an interim buy of used F/A-18 Hornets from Australia, dashing Boeing’s hopes of a Super Hornet sale, three sources familiar with the situation told Reuters, according to a Dec. 5 report.

Canada intended to buy new Super Hornet aircraft to bridge the gap between its aging CF-18 Hornet fleet and a new fighter jet. However, after Boeing lodged a legal complaint accusing Canadian aerospace firm Bombardier of dumping commercial planes on the U.S. market, Canadian government officials — including Prime Minister Justin Trudeau — put a hold on the purchase and began looking at other options.

Officials from Canada’s Department of National Defence said they would not comment on the rumors. Public Services and Procurement Canada, which would handle any purchase, did not issue a comment on the report.

Boeing also declined to comment on the Reuters report.

During an exclusive interview with Defense News on Dec. 2, Leanne Caret, president and CEO of Boeing Defense and Security, referenced the company’s long history with the Royal Canadian Air Force, which flies CF-18 Hornets. However, she stopped short of saying she believed problems with Canada could be resolved.

Boeing Defense CEO on the possible F/A-18 deal with Canada:

“As with any of our customer’s decisions, we are there for the long term and in Canada we have had a proud history with them for decades. They are going to make the right decision that is right for them,” she said.

Speaking to Defense News last month, RCAF commander Lt. Gen. Michael Hood said that if the service bought used Hornets from Australia, the Canadian government would have to invest in extending the lives of the airframes, which are meeting their structural end. L3 Technologies, which has worked on the CF-18s previously, would likely pick up that contract— further shutting out Boeing.

The decision to reverse course on the Super Hornet deal could have colossal implications for Canada’s future fighter competition. When the government announced the Super Hornet interim buy in 2016, it was widely seen as a rebuke of Lockheed Martin’s F-35 and a sign that the Super Hornet was on a fast track to win Canada’s competition.

Continued tensions between Canada and Boeing shot a hole through that vision, bolstering not only the chances of Lockheed’s F-35, but also the Eurofighter Typhoon, Saab Gripen E and Dassault Rafale.

David Pugilese in Canada and Aaron Mehta in Washington contributed to this report.

https://www.defensenews.com/air/2017/12/05/canada-to-kill-boeing-super-hornet-deal/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DFN DNR 12.05.17&utm_term=Editorial - Daily News Roundup
 

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Canada scraps plan to buy Boeing fighters amid trade dispute: sources
by David Ljunggren
DECEMBER 06, 2017


OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canada is scrapping a plan to buy 18 Boeing Co Super Hornet fighter jets amid a deepening dispute with the U.S. aerospace company, three sources familiar with the matter said on Tuesday.

Instead, the Liberal government will announce next week it intends to acquire a used fleet of older Australia F-18 jets, the same kind of plane Canada currently operates, said the sources, who asked not to be identified because of the sensitivity of the situation.

The move underlines Ottawa’s anger at a decision by Boeing to launch a trade challenge against Canadian planemaker Bombardier Inc, which the U.S. giant accuses of dumping airliners on the American market.

It also casts into question the future of Boeing’s military sales in Canada. Boeing says its commercial and defense operations in Canada support more than 17,000 Canadian jobs.

Canada and Mexico are locked into increasingly acrimonious negotiations with the United States over the NAFTA trade pact, which President Donald Trump says has not done enough to protect U.S. jobs.

The Liberal Party of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau initially said in late 2016 it wanted the Boeing jets as a stopgap measure until it could launch a competition for a permanent fleet to replace Canada’s ageing CF-18 jets.

But as relations with Boeing deteriorated, Ottawa slammed the firm for not acting as a trusted partner and began looking at the Australian jets.

Australia’s Defence Department said Canada lodged a formal expression of interest for “a number” of Australia’s F/A-18 Classic Hornets on Sept. 29, in a statement emailed to Reuters.

“Defence is continuing to assist Canada in regards to their EOI,” the statement added, without disclosing a price or any other details.
Two sources also said Australian military officials had been in Ottawa late last month for talks.

One source said that by buying the Australian fleet, Canada would save money as well as avoid the need to train its pilots on a new aircraft or spend money on a new supply chain.

Officials had previously said that if the purchase went ahead, some of the Australian aircraft would be used for spare parts.
The offices of Public Works Minister Carla Qualtrough and Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan, who share responsibility for military procurement, both declined to comment.

Boeing declined to comment. The Australian mission in Ottawa was not immediately available for comment.

Canada is due to officially announce the requirements for its new fighter fleet in early 2019, kicking off an open competition.

One potential contender is Lockheed Martin Corp’s F-35 fighter, which Trudeau initially said he would not buy because it was too expensive. The government has since softened its line, saying the plane would be allowed to compete.

Additional reporting by Leah Schnurr in OTTAWA, Allison Lampert in MONTREAL and Tom Westbrook in SYDNEY; Editing by Lisa Shumaker, Sandra Maler and Kim Coghill

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-canada-boeing-fighterjets/canada-scraps-plan-to-buy-boeing-fighters-amid-trade-dispute-sources-idUSKBN1DZ2W2
 

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Boeing statement on the Canadian Interim Fighter Capability Project and free and fair competition:
Dec 08, 2017

We have read reports that the Government of Canada is choosing to purchase used F/A-18 Classic Hornets from the Royal Australian Air Force in lieu of new Super Hornet fighter jets.

The Boeing Company respects the Canadian government’s decision and applauds the government’s continued use of a two engine fighter solution, which is a critical part of their northern Arctic border defense, NORAD cooperation, and coast to coast to coast security.

Although we will not have the opportunity to grow our supply base, industrial partnerships and jobs in Canada the way we would if Canada purchased new Super Hornets, we will continue to look to find productive ways to work together in the future. Boeing is fortunate to have an outstanding 100 years of partnership with Canada, which had culminated in our $4B annual economic impact in Canada, and we look forward to partnering for the next 100 years.

Our commitment to creating a level playing field in aerospace remains. Therefore, we will continue to support all efforts to build an environment of free and fair competition marked by compliance with agreed upon rules.

http://boeing.mediaroom.com/2017-12-08-Boeing-statement-on-the-Canadian-Interim-Fighter-Capability-Project-and-free-and-fair-competition
 

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Potential ‘harm’ to economy now a factor in all Canada defense competitions
By: David Pugliese
13 Dec 2017


OHKAGGRBONGUXJVMOARKKFESKE.jpg

Two Royal Canadian Air Force CF-188 Hornet fighters from 433 Tactical Fighter Squadron fly over Iceland on May 31, 2017. (Cpl. Gary Calve/Royal Canadian Air Force)

VICTORIA, British Columbia – In a major policy shift, Canada will now determine the winning firms for its defense equipment projects not only based on the benefits a company can provide but also the “harm” individual corporations have on the Canadian economy.

The change, announced Tuesday with the launch of a (CAN) $19 billion project (U.S. $14 billion) to buy 88 next generation fighter jets, is clearly aimed at Boeing, which earlier this year filed a trade complaint against Canada’s largest aerospace firm, Bombardier.

But the criteria will apply to all future defense procurements, Canadian government officials said Tuesday.

“This new policy clearly demonstrates that we are standing up for Canadian interests,” said Navdeep Bains, the minister of innovation, science and economic development.

“If there’s an impact on Canadian jobs you will be at a distinct disadvantage,” he said of firms who want to bid on military equipment projects.

In April, Boeing asked the U.S. Commerce Department to investigate Bombardier, claiming that Canadian government subsidies for that Quebec-based firm allow it to sell its C-Series passenger aircraft in the U.S. at cut-rate prices. As a result, the Trump administration brought in a tariff of almost 300 percent against Bombardier aircraft sold in the U.S.

In retaliation for Boeing’s actions, Canada decided against buying 18 new Super Hornet fighter jets in a deal that would have been worth $5.23 billion.

The announcement of the new procurement policy further ups the ante against Boeing, but government officials say it will send a strong message to countries as well that Canada will not idly stand by and accept unfair trade barriers.

Canada plans to spend billions of dollars in the coming years on new aerial refuelling tankers, unmanned aerial vehicles and satellites. Boeing is interested in all of those programs.

Canada’s procurement minister Carla Qualtrough said all companies are welcome to bid on the upcoming fighter jet program. Proposals will be requested in 2019 and a winner selected in 2022. Eighty-eight fighter jets will be purchased, she added.

Delivery of the first planes are expected in 2025.

But Qualtrough noted that the new policy provides for the examination of whether a bidder has been “responsible for harming Canada’s economic interests.”

Although she didn’t name Boeing specifically, the minister pointed out that such an evaluation would be based on a company’s actions at the time bids are examined. That would give Boeing a chance to drop its trade complaint against Bombardier, government officials say.

Boeing said Tuesday it will examine what is being called the “Boeing clause.”

“We will review the future fighter capability project requirements for 88 jets and make a decision at the appropriate time,” company spokesman Scott Day said.

He noted that Boeing is the largest non-Canadian aerospace manufacturer in Canada and has around 2,000 employees in the country.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has accused Boeing to trying to eliminate tens of thousands of aerospace jobs at Bombardier through its efforts. “As a government they should not expect us to buy planes off them if they are attacking our industry,” he said on Sept. 17.

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan and Bains said Tuesday that Canada will only deal with a “trusted partner” on the new fighter jets. Sajjan had previously said Boeing is no longer considered a trusted partner by Canada.

Boeing officials have insisted that its trade actions against Bombardier’s civilian aircraft should not be tied to defense procurements.

Instead of buying 18 Super Hornets as a stop-gap measure until the new fighters arrive, the Canadian government announced Tuesday it would purchase used F-18s from Australia.

https://www.defensenews.com/global/the-americas/2017/12/12/potential-harm-to-economy-now-a-factor-in-all-canada-defense-competitions/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DFN DNR 12.12.17&utm_term=Editorial - Daily News Roundup
 

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First was the F-35 and now the F-18? The Eurofighter would a suitable option for Canada since it does not have any ACC after the HMCS Bonaventure was put to retire.

Rest in peace Canada Air Force.
 

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First was the F-35 and now the F-18? The Eurofighter would a suitable option for Canada since it does not have any ACC after the HMCS Bonaventure was put to retire.

Rest in peace Canada Air Force.
To be Honest, the F35 is too over hyped. The F18E/F is no where in the league of the EFT or Rafale. As to the F18's from Australia, why the urgency? No immediate threats, dump them too.

IMO Canada should go for Rafale F4, which means not before 2022
 

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To be Honest, the F35 is too over hyped. The F18E/F is no where in the league of the EFT or Rafale. As to the F18's from Australia, why the urgency? No immediate threats, dump them too.

IMO Canada should go for Rafale F4, which means not before 2022
Do you think the queen is going to approve the sale. No way. France and Canada relation is shallow. Refer to the "Quebec sovereignty movement" to know the deal.
 

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Do you think the queen is going to approve the sale. No way. France and Canada relation is shallow. Refer to the "Quebec sovereignty movement" to know the deal.
You know, today morning we were discussing at work, why the British PM gives the Queen a weekly briefing, IF she is just "symbolic."
 

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Canada to buy fleet of 30-year-old fighter jets from Australia in snub to US
Ottawa ditched plan to buy newer fleet of Boeing Super Hornets after US imposed 80% import tariff on Canadian Bombardier jets
Guardian staff and Reuters
13 December 2017


3600.jpg

Canada to buy fleet of Australian F/A-18 Hornet fighter jets, dubbed ‘fixer-uppers’ by Canadian opposition. Photograph: RAAF/EPA


Canada will purchase a fleet of 30-year-old F/A-18 Hornet fighter jets from Australia amid an escalating trade dispute with the US.
Plans to buy a newer fleet of 18 Boeing Super Hornets were ditched after the US imposed an 80% tariff on imports of Bombardier passenger aircraft and Canada will instead spend about $500m on the fleet of vintage RAAF planes.

Ottawa announced last year it wanted to buy the Super Hornets as a stopgap measure while it runs a competition for 88 jets to replace its ageing 77 CF-18s fighters, but it scrapped those plans and made clear the company had little chance of winning a much larger contract unless it dropped the trade challenge against the Canadian aircraft manufacturer.

The announcement marks a new low in relations between Canada’s Liberal government and Boeing and casts into doubt the future of defence cooperation with the US aerospace company, which says it supports more than 17,500 jobs in Canada.
But Boeing has indicated it is unlikely to back down on the trade challenge and the issue has become a political problem for the

Canadian prime minister, Justin Trudeau. Andrew Scheer, leader of the official opposition Conservative party, on Tuesday mocked him for buying old jets.
“If the prime minister is so keen on buying fixer-uppers, will he come over, because I have an old minivan I would love to show him,” Scheer said to laughter in the House of Commons.

Jonathan Vance, chief of the defence staff of the Canadian Armed Forces, told ABC News the Australian jets would be an adequate stopgap measure until its next-generation fighter fleet was delivered in about 2025.

The used Australian jets will be flown to Canada in 2018.

The Canadian air force has long preferred a US jet, according to sources. Canada is part of the consortium that helped develop Lockheed Martin’s F-35 stealth fighter and the previous Conservative government announced in 2010 it would buy 65 of the planes.

It later backtracked and during the 2015 election campaign Trudeau vowed not to buy the fighter on the grounds it was too expensive. After he took power, the government softened its tone.

But Trudeau is not a fan of the F-35 and the Boeing spat means officials are prepared to look at rivals such as the Eurofighter Typhoon and Dassault Aviation SA’s Rafale jet, say the sources, who asked to remain anonymous given the sensitivity of the situation.

If Canada went for the Typhoon or the Rafale, it would have to decide whether to use US weapons or buy European armaments systems and integrate them with those used by US forces.

One defence expert noted that Britain, Germany and Italy intend to operate both the F-35 and the Eurofighter, evidence that Canada could buy the European jet and still operate with US air force F-35s.

Although Canada will extend the lifespan of some CF-18s to 2025 to cover the introduction of the new fighters, Canadian Global Affairs Institute defence analyst David Perry on Wednesday predicted Ottawa would keep the old planes in service for longer than planned and drag out the competition.

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/dec/13/canada-to-buy-fleet-of-30-year-old-fighter-jets-from-australia-in-snub-to-us?CMP=soc_567
 

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Government launches open and transparent competition to replace Canada's fighter aircraft
NEWS PROVIDED BY
Public Services and Procurement Canada
Dec 12, 2017

OTTAWA, Dec. 12, 2017 /CNW/ - Acquiring the aircraft that Canada's military needs to help ensure the safety and security of Canadians, while ensuring economic benefits for Canada, is a top priority for the Government of Canada. The government is delivering on its promise to hold an open and transparent competition to permanently replace Canada'sfighter fleet.

As outlined in the Strong, Secure, Engaged defence policy, Canada will purchase 88 advanced fighter aircraft. This is the most significant investment in the Royal Canadian Air Force in more than 30 years, and is essential for protecting the safety and security of Canadians, and meeting international defence obligations.

Through this competition, the Government of Canada will ensure it gets the right aircraft at the right price, and maximizes economic benefits for Canadians. The government will ensure that the Canadian aerospace and defence industries and manufacturers are consulted and engaged in this process.

Proposals will be rigorously assessed on cost, technical requirements and industrial, technological and economic benefits. As it is important to do business with trusted partners, the evaluation of bids will also include an assessment of bidders' impact on Canada's economic interests.

When bids are assessed, any bidder responsible for harm to Canada's economic interests will be at a distinct disadvantage. This new assessment, as well as guidelines for its application as an ongoing procurement tool, will be developed through appropriate consultations.

In addition, the Industrial and Technological Benefits Policy will apply to this procurement, requiring the winning supplier to make investments in Canada equal to the value of the contract.

Until permanent replacement aircraft are in place and fully operational, Canada must ensure that the Canadian Armed Forces has the equipment it needs to continue to deliver its missions, and meet its international obligations. As such, the Government of Canada will pursue the purchase of 18 supplemental jets from the Australian Government.

Quotes
"As we promised, our government is launching an open and transparent competition to replace our fighter fleet with 88 advanced jets.
We are also supplementing our CF-18 fleet by pursuing the purchase of jets from Australia while we complete this important and complex procurement. Today's announcement is about ensuring that our women and men in uniform continue to have the equipment they need to protect Canadians. At the same time, we will use this procurement to strengthen our aerospace and defence industries, create good middle-class jobs and support our economic interests."
The Honourable Carla Qualtrough
Minister of Public Services and Procurement


"Our women and men in uniform are entrusted with the enormous responsibility of ensuring the safety of Canadians every day. Today's announcement is a key step toward making sure that they have the equipment they need to fulfill this responsibility and meet our commitments to our partners and allies around the world."
The Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan
Minister of National Defence


"This project represents a significant opportunity to support the long-term competitiveness of Canada's aerospace and defence industries, which together contribute more than 240,000 jobs to the Canadian economy. We are committed to leveraging the procurement of the future fleet to support innovation, promote the growth of Canadian suppliers, including small and medium-sized businesses, and create middle-class jobs for Canadians."
The Honourable Navdeep Bains
Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development


Quick facts
  • Today's announcement marks the official launch of the open, competitive process to replace Canada's fighter jet fleet.
  • The government will begin by establishing a list of suppliers, comprised of foreign governments and fighter aircraft manufacturers that have demonstrated their ability to meet Canada's needs, as defined in the Suppliers List invitation. All companies are welcome to participate in the process.
  • Extensive planning and stakeholder engagement will take place throughout 2018 and 2019.
  • A contract award is anticipated in 2022 and the first replacement aircraft delivered in 2025.
  • The government will engage with foreign governments, fighter aircraft manufacturers and the Canadian aerospace and defence industries to ensure they are well-positioned to participate.
  • The purchase of 88 aircraft represents an increase in fleet size of more than a third of what was planned prior to the Strong, Secure, Engaged defence policy (65 aircraft).
  • Together, Canada's aerospace and defence industries contribute over 240,000 quality jobs.
  • Aerospace is one of the most innovative and export-driven industries in Canada and adds $28 billion annually in gross domestic product to Canada's economy.
  • The Canadian defence sector includes over 650 firms employing highly skilled workers in high-quality jobs.
http://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/government-launches-open-and-transparent-competition-to-replace-canadas-fighter-aircraft-663690663.html
 

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Boeing a no-show at industry day for Canada jet buy
By: David Pugliese   7 hours ago
Officials from Boeing were not involved in Canada's industry day, although members of the U.S. Navy, which operates the company’s Super Hornet jets, were present. (MC3 Alex Corona/U.S. Navy)

VICTORIA, British Columbia — Some 200 participants from seven countries took part in the first industry day for Canada’s proposed purchase of a new fighter jet, but one company was notably absent — Boeing.

Canada has announced it will buy 88 new aircraft in a project estimated to cost more than CA$16 billion (U.S. $12 billion), but Boeing has not said whether it will take part in the competition. Boeing has been involved in a dispute with Canada that started last year when the company asked the U.S. Commerce Department to investigate Canadian aerospace firm Bombardier.

Canadian officials said as many as 108 firms took part in Monday’s gathering that outlined the basic parameters for a next-generation fighter jet.

Canada will now develop a list of suppliers — foreign governments and their aircraft manufacturers — who have expressed interest in the Canadian program.

A request for proposals for the new jets is expected to be released in spring of 2019, said Troy Crosby, director general for defense major projects for Public Services and Procurement Canada, the federal department coordinating the acquisition. A contract would be awarded in 2021 or 2022.

Lockheed Martin’s F-35, Eurofighter Typhoon, the Dassault Rafale and Saab’s Gripen are aircraft that could be considered. Industry sources say representatives of those firms took part in the Canadian meeting.

Officials from Boeing were not involved, although members of the U.S. Navy, which operates the company’s Super Hornet jets, were present.

In Boeing’s dispute with Canada, the company claims that Canadian government subsidies allow Bombardier to sell its C Series passenger aircraft in the U.S. at cut-rate prices. As a result, the Trump administration brought in a tariff of almost 300 percent against Bombardier aircraft sold in the U.S.

In retaliation for Boeing’s actions, Canada canceled its plan to buy 18 new Super Hornet fighter jets in a deal that would have been worth $5.23 billion.

It also added a new policy on the current fighter jet procurement that would penalize a bidder who has been “responsible for harming Canada’s economic interests.”

Boeing spokesman Scott Day said the firm believes the Super Hornet is a low-risk, low-cost approach that has all the advanced capabilities the Royal Canadian Air Force needs in the future. “We will evaluate our participation in Canada’s Future Fighter Capability project after the government of Canada outlines the FFCP procurement approach, requirements and evaluation criteria,” Day said.

https://www.defensenews.com/industry/2018/01/24/boeing-a-no-show-at-industry-day-for-canada-jet-buy/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DFN DNR 1.24.18&utm_term=Editorial - Daily News Roundup
 

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Canada auditor general prepares new fighter jet report
By: Daniel Cebul
31.01.2018
A Canadian Royal Air Force F-18 takes off from the military air base at Campia Turzii on May 28, 2014. (Mircea Rosca/AFP via Getty Images)

WASHINGTON — Canada’s auditor general, Michael Ferguson, is reviewing the country’s fighter jet programs in preparation for a future fighter jet competition in 2019. Ferguson and his team have reportedly been reviewing internal government records for several months, although it is unclear which programs are under investigation.

Since 2016, Canada has been preparing to procure new fighters to replace 76 F/A-18 Hornets that are quickly approaching the end of their service life.

A legal complaint filed by Boeing with the U.S. International Trade Commission against Canadian aerospace company Bombardier in May effectively blew up a deal in place for the American company to supply its northern neighbors with 18 new fighters in the interim before Canada made its decision on a more significant contract.

Boeing suffered a blow at the hands of the ITC on Friday when the trade body voted 4-0 in favor of Bombadier. The vote blocks a U.S. Department of Commerce ruling that would have imposed a nearly 300 percent tariff on Bombardier C Series imports, whose largest program customer is Delta Air Lines.

Last week, Boeing was absent from a Canadian industry day for the future fighter program, further signalling that the door is open for European suppliers to compete for the estimated $14 billion contract.

The Eurofighter Typhoon, Dassault Rafale and Saab’s Gripen E are possible alternative platforms that could be selected.


A Royal Canadian Air Force CF-188 Hornet flies over Iraq on March 4, 2015. (Staff Sgt. Perry Aston/U.S. Air Force)

In an exclusive Defense News interview in November, the head of the Royal Canadian Air Force, Lt. Gen. Michael Hood, discussed the country’s plans to replace the service’s aging F/A-18s.

“The plan right now is to have a request for proposal out to industry by 2019. We’re in discussions and have been in discussions with a number of the people who are considering competing for that, and what I’d like to see is that accelerated as much as possible,” he said.
However, Hood's wish for speed is unlikely to be granted. While the hope was to award a contract by 2021 with delivery scheduled by 2025, documents released at last week’s industry day suggest the new delivery target date is set for 2031.

To maintain capability in the interim, Canada has agreed to purchase an undisclosed number of Australian F/A-18s. These planes, however, are already 30 years old and will need to undergo a service life extension program to keep them in the air.

https://www.defensenews.com/air/2018/01/30/canada-auditor-general-prepares-new-fighter-jet-report/
 

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Boeing stays in race to supply Canada with fighter jets: sources
David Ljunggren
FEBRUARY 15, 2018

OTTAWA (Reuters) - Boeing Co, locked in a trade dispute with the Canadian government, has applied to stay in the race to supply Canada with 88 new fighter jets, three well-placed sources said on Thursday.

Companies had until Feb. 9 to express an interest in taking part in a competition for planes worth between C$15 billion ($12.1 billion) and C$19 billion. Ottawa will release its specifications next year, at which point firms can bid.

Boeing did let Canada know it was interested, said the sources, who requested anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media. The decision does not mean the firm will necessarily put forward its F-18 Super Hornet.

Boeing did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
The U.S. aerospace company infuriated the Canadian government last year by launching a trade challenge against planemaker Bombardier Inc <BBDb.TO, accusing it of dumping airliners in the American market.

Although a U.S. trade commission dismissed the complaint on Jan. 26, Boeing can still appeal the decision or launch another complaint against the Canadian firm.

Well-informed sources said last week Ottawa has made clear to Boeing that its chances of winning the 88-jet deal would be harmed if it pursued the Bombardier case.

Defense experts say Lockheed Martin Corp’s new F-35 stealth fighter is likely the front runner. Dassault Aviation SA and Airbus SE also are expected to compete, but with planes that first flew in the 1990s.

Ottawa says bids will be evaluated in part on the basis of “past and recent economic behavior of potential bidders leading up to the procurement.”

That test is months away from being finalised, meaning Boeing has no idea whether Ottawa would be satisfied if it did drop the challenge, the sources said.

Additional reporting by Allison Lampert in Montreal; Editing by James Dalgleish

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-canada-boeing-fighterjets/boeing-stays-in-race-to-supply-canada-with-fighter-jets-sources-idUSKCN1FZ2M9
 

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I don't Think Trump is going to backoff nor do I think Canada is heading for another jet beside the F-18 however, there is a serious talk regarding the EF Typhoon. I just hope RCAF goes for the EF this time or buy whatever the Aussies are offering. Canada is trying to turn Boeing against the Trump administration that's all.
 

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I don't Think Trump is going to backoff nor do I think Canada is heading for another jet beside the F-18 however, there is a serious talk regarding the EF Typhoon. I just hope RCAF goes for the EF this time or buy whatever the Aussies are offering. Canada is trying to turn Boeing against the Trump administration that's all.
I seriously want the Canadians to buy something besides the F18's this time.
 

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