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China's paramilitary police to fall under communist party control
By Elizabeth Shim | Dec. 27, 2017

(UPI) -- Chinese President Xi Jinping may be strengthening his grip on power as the Central Military Commission starts to control the country's paramilitary police force beginning Jan. 1.

The armed police force, formerly under Beijing's State Council, will also be under the command of the Chinese Communist Party's Central Committee, Xinhua reported Wednesday.

The new policy means Xi, who has consolidated his power since the 19th Party Congress, will be directing the paramilitary police force, leaving out input from local or regional governments.

Regional authorities will no longer be able to mobilize police as the central leadership exerts more influence domestically, South Korean news agency Yonhap reported.

The armed police force was created in June 1982, during the era of former leader Deng Xiaoping.

The main purpose of the paramilitary police units was to safeguard national security.

The Central Military Commission and the State Council historically shared responsibilities for managing the force.

Local authorities previously deployed paramilitary police to suppress protests and political rallies, and the same police force took into custody former vice-mayor of Chongqing, Wang Lijun, now in prison, after he may have been seeking asylum at a U.S. consulate.

Wang's meeting with U.S. officials and his differences with corrupt Chongqing Communist Party secretary Bo Xilai later led to Bo's downfall.

The reorganization comes at a time when Beijing remains uneasy about "managing the Chinese people" despite its authoritarianism.

"In China there's a volcano underneath that can come out at any time," a U.S. analyst said in December.

Feminist activists and human rights lawyers are seen as "sparking this anger," and are promptly arrested because of their potential impact on the party's rule, according to Andrew Nathan.

https://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2017/12/27/Chinas-paramilitary-police-to-fall-under-communist-party-control/9751514389575/?nll=1
 

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China deploying drones for 'surveillance and strikes'
By Elizabeth Shim | Dec. 29, 2017
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(UPI) -- The Chinese military is deploying a new generation of reconnaissance-attack drones that could neutralize the strategic effects of U.S. THAAD batteries in South Korea.

The People's Liberation Army Daily reported Friday the army has been deploying the Yilong-1 drone, and suggested deployment of the Yilong-2 could take place, following a successful flight test of the unmanned aerial vehicle on Feb. 27.

The Chengdu Aircraft Design Institute presided over the development of the Yilong-2.

The Chinese state-controlled newspaper said the drones can be used for reconnaissance, surveillance and strikes.

Analysts have said the unmanned aerial vehicles would soon be handed over to front-line military units for operations, according to South Korean news service Newsis.

China has competed against the United States and Israel in the drone market, and has offered cheaper defense exports to international buyers.

The Yilong-2 is priced at $1 million, a substantially lower price than the U.S. MQ-9 Reaper at $30 million.

The Yilong drones resemble the U.S.-manufactured MQ-1 Predator and was publicly unveiled for the first time at the 2012 Zhuhai Air Show in China.

The Yilong weighs 1.1 tons, has a 14-meter wingspan, can be equipped with six missiles, and can fly for more than 20 hours without stopping.

The deployment of the U.S. missile defense system on the Korean peninsula has been met with strong opposition from Beijing.

On Friday, Chinese state tabloid Global Times listed THAAD deployment as one of the "top 10" news items of 2017.

Other top news topics in China included North Korea's nuclear and missile tests, China's foreign policy initiatives, U.S. President Donald Trump's "America First" policy and strained relations with Taiwan.

https://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2017/12/29/China-deploying-drones-for-surveillance-and-strikes/5811514558053/?nll=1
 

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New ballistic missile that covers globe nearly ready
By Zhao Lei | China Daily | Updated: 2017-11-29

Powerful 4th-generation weapon could enhance PLA capabilities by early 2018

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Intercontinental ballistic missiles currently in service are displayed during a military parade in September. These missiles are designated DF-31AG. [Photo/Xinhua]

The People's Liberation Army will soon have one of the world's mightiest weapons - the DF-41 intercontinental ballistic missile - military experts close to the PLA have said.
Yang Chengjun, a missile expert with knowledge of the country's ballistic missile programs, recently told China Central Television that the DF-41's development has entered its final stage, and the formidable weapon is likely to be delivered to the PLA Rocket Force in the first few months of 2018.

Based on the missile's tests so far, development has been proceeding well, he said. All of its test launches so far were successful.

The DF-41 is a fourth-generation ballistic missile, having good reliability, mobility, precision, strike range and rapid-launch capability, observers say.

The missile "should be capable of being deployed and launched on rugged landforms and able to resist electronic-warfare attacks. It must be able to carry multiple warheads to hit targets anywhere on the globe," Yang told the broadcaster.

"Judging from available information, its overall capability is similar to that of the United States' LGM-30G Minuteman III and Russia's RT-2PM2 Topol-M. Some of its technologies are better than those used by the US and Russian models."

Widely considered one of the PLA's deadliest and most camouflaged pieces of hardware, the DF-41 has been the topic of speculation by military enthusiasts and media reports for years but its existence has never been officially confirmed by the military.

"The DF-41 can cover any corner on the earth. Anyone who dares to launch a nuclear strike against us will face effective retaliation," Yang said.

Xu Guangyu, a retired major general of the PLA and current strategy researcher in Beijing, previously described the missile as having a total weight of more than 60 metric tons, and capable of delivering up to 10 warheads totaling 1.6 tons. He said it would have an operational range of 12,000 to 14,000 kilometers.

The missile was designed by the China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology, part of China Aerospace Science and Technology Corp, a major defense contractor, according to unconfirmed information.

Western media reported that the DF-41 has undergone at least eight flight tests since the first one in July 2012.

Neither the PLA Rocket Force nor the academy could be reached on Tuesday.

According to PLA Daily, the Rocket Force has at least 10 types of missiles in active service, including the DF-31AG intercontinental ballistic missile, the DF-26 intermediate-range ballistic missile and the CJ-10A ground-launched cruise missile.
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2017-11/29/content_35119000.htm
 

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China's Wing Loong UAS creates record of "five hits in succession"
Source: Xinhua
2017-12-31
Editor: Mengjie


BEIJING, Dec. 31 (Xinhua) -- China's newly-developed Wing Loong II UAS, a high-end reconnaissance-strike unmanned aerial system (UAS), has created a record "five hits in succession," its developer announced Sunday.

After multiple rounds of flight and firing tests, the Wing Loong II UAS has achieved a hit rate of 100 percent, said the state-owned aviation giant of Aviation Industry Corporation of China (AVIC).

"The Wing Loong II UAS has successfully hits five targets in succession with five different types of missiles in a single sortie, setting a new live firing record for Chinese UAS," AVIC said.

To date, the newly-developed reconnaissance-strike-integrated UAS has conducted firing tests with eight types of missiles and dozens of bombs, with a hit rate of 100 percent.

The Wing Loong II UAS is a China-developed new generation of long endurance reconnaissance-strike-integrated UAS by AVIC's Chengdu Aircraft Design & Research Institute (CADI).

The system is composed of the ground station and various numbers of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

It successfully completed its maiden flight in northwestern China on Feb. 27 this year, showing that China was capable of developing large-scale reconnaissance-strike UAS to international standards.

Within 10 months of its maiden flight, multiple live firing tests had been conducted in accordance with the requirement of its customers, including stationary targets, moving targets, time sensitive targets and air-ground coordination.

Meanwhile, the Wing Loong II UAS has successfully conducted the "control of two vehicles with one station," which had never been achieved by a Chinese UAS before.

According to CADI, in the 10-month flight tests, the Wing Loong II UAS accomplished a series of flight missions to verify the UAS platform, payload, weapons and ground control station.

"All the performance specifications of Wing Loong II UAS are validated comprehensively through high-intensity and concentrated flight tests, which shows that it has met user requirements and possesses full operational capability," CADI said.

"Seven years after its launch on the market, the Wing Loong series has been successfully equipped by multiple users, going through tests in various severe environments," said Ji Xiaoguang, CADI president. "It has realized operation normalization, been used in actual combat, and made remarkable achievements. It has earned a good reputation in many countries and established brand recognition of Chinese 'Wing Loong' worldwide."

The Wing Loong II UAS has already obtained the largest order of Chinese advanced large-scale UAVs in the overseas market, even before its maiden flight.

To date, Wing Loong I and II UAS have realized high quality and quick delivery as per contract requirements signed with foreign customers. Both have accomplished long-distance handovers to execute missions, according to CADI.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2017-12/31/c_136863482.htm

 

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New J-16 Fighters Enter China's Air Fleet
12.Jan.2018
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China's J-16 fighter jets are quietly being introduced to the People's Liberation Army Air Force at a faster rate than the country's new fifth-generation J-20, though the latter has garnered much more international attention.

At least two new squadrons of J-16 fighter jets have been added or are in the process of converting to J-16 squadrons, Defense News reported Wednesday, citing images recently published by the Chinese Ministry of National Defense. With the additions, the PLAAF has at least three J-16 units in its arsenal: the 172nd, the 173rd and the 98th brigades, Defense News noted.

The J-16 is an indigenously built fighter modeled after Russia's multi-role Su-30 Flanker fighter jet, which aviation experts consider to fare favorably against the US F-15 Strike Eagle. China's air force and navy also operate the Su-30. The J-16 is more advanced that the J-11 (which is itself modeled on the closely related Su-27) in the sense that it is well-suited for ground strike missions as well as air-to-air combat.

J-16s entered the PLAAF in small numbers in 2015, Defense News notes, adding that wider introduction was postponed in order to better develop the electronically scanned array radar for the aircraft.

The PLAAF commissioned the first J-20 last September, but experts expect integration of the fifth-generation aircraft to be "very long and painful," as it has been with the US Air Force's F-35. "The process of fifth-gen fighters' introduction to the US Air Force was very long and painful," said Vasily Kashin, a fellow at the Center for Comprehensive European and International Studies in Moscow, when the J-20 made its public debut. "There's no reason to think China would be different," Kashin said.

China has also been developing an even newer aircraft than the J-20. In 2012, China's J-31 prototype made its first public flight at the Zhuhai airshow. "I think they'll eventually be on par with our fifth-gen jets – as they should be, because industrial espionage is alive and well," a senior US fighter pilot familiar with the F-35 told USNI News in 2014.

© Sputnik

https://sputniknews.com/military/201801121060717300-j-16-fighters-enter-china-fleet/
 

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Images reveal China’s J-16 jets stepping up introduction into service
By: Mike Yeo  
11 Jan 2018

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A pair of Shenyang J-16 multirole fighters take off. (China's Ministry of National Defense)

MELBOURNE, Australia — China’s new Shenyang J-16 multirole fighter jet has been entering service in increasing numbers with little fanfare, with the lion’s share of attention focused on the stealthy Chengdu J-20 fighter’s development and introduction.

Images released by the Chinese military of a recent parade and exercise at Cangzhou in China’s northeastern Hebei province in early January show that at least two other People’s Liberation Army Air Force, or PLAAF, air brigades have converted or are in the process of converting to the J-16, bringing the total to three such units known to have the type into service.

This includes the 172nd and 176th brigades of the PLAAF’s Flight Test and Training Center, which is “assigned the task of developing flight techniques, combat tactics and training program for new aircraft and equipment,” according to Andreas Rupprecht, who has authored a number of books on Chinese military aviation.

The serial number on the aircraft at the recent exercise indicates that the third unit operating the J-16 is the 98th Brigade based at Chongqing in China’s southwest. There have also been reports from China that the 7th Brigade at Wuhu, Anhui province, is operating the J-16, although Defense News has been unable to confirm this.

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On display during a PLAAF parade are Shenyang J-16s, foreground, and J-11Bs, background. (China's Ministry of National Defense)

A small number of J-16s entered service with the Flight Test and Training Center’s 176th Brigade in 2015 for the PLAAF equivalent of operational testing and evaluation; however multiple sources have said the wider introduction of the type into PLAAF service was reportedly delayed due to the need to refine the design of its active electronically scanned array radar developed by China’s No. 607 Institute.

The Shenyang J-16 is an indigenously developed Chinese offshoot of the Russian Su-30 Flanker-C multirole fighter, which is also operated by the PLAAF and China’s People’s Liberation Army Navy. Unlike the Shenyang J-11B/BS, which is a dedicated air combat aircraft based on the earlier Sukhoi Su-27, the J-16 is configured for both air-to-air and air-to-ground missions with its multimode AESA radar.

Like the J-11B/BS, the J-16 is powered by the Chinese WS-10 Taihang turbofan engine. However, the J-16 has provision for in-flight refueling, an infrared search and track system offset to the right of the canopy, and twin nose wheels to cope with a higher maximum takeoff weight, and it lacks a pitot tube on its nose cone.

An electronic attack version, tentatively designated J-16D, is under development, with at least one prototype known to have made a number of test flights.

https://www.defensenews.com/air/2018/01/10/images-reveal-chinas-j-16-jets-stepping-up-introduction-into-service/
 

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RUSSIA REPORTEDLY BEGINS DELIVERING S-400 SYSTEMS TO CHINA
by Bilal Khan
Jan 21, 2018


S-400-Dmitriy-Vinogradov-Sputnik-692x360.jpg

Photo credit: Dmitriy Vinogradov via Sputnik News



The Russian News Agency TASS reports that Russia has begun delivering Almaz-Antey S-400 Triumf long-range surface-to-air missile (SAM) systems to China.

“[China’s] shipment includes a control station, a radar station, energy and support equipment, spare parts, various tools and other elements of the S-400 system,” states TASS citing an unnamed source.

The news was later confirmed by Russia’s Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation, which had added that some of the equipment got damaged due to a storm while en route to China.

China is the launch export customer of the S-400, having signed a contract for the system in November 2014. China is also the foreign launch buyer of United Aircraft Corporation’s (UAC) Sukhoi Su-35 Flanker-E, having signed onto 24 aircraft in November 2015. Deliveries of the Su-35 began in December 2016.

Considering the serial production of both long-range SAMs and Flanker-series fighters in China, these off-the-shelf purchases from Russia are intriguing. At the minimum, Beijing’s imports do indicate a willingness to continue engaging with the Russian industry as well as a parallel avenue (to domestic production) for procurement, enabling it to shore-up air combat and air defence capabilities at a faster pace.

The S-400 can engage targets at up to 400 km through the use of its 40N6 SAM. However, as a multi-layered system, the S-400 is also equipped with shorter-range SAMs – i.e. 48N6 (250 km), 9M96E2 (120 km) and 9M96E (60 km). Hence, it is a comprehensive air defence system.

Turkey followed China as the second S-400 buyer, having inked a deal – along with a down-payment – at the end of 2017. India had principally agreed to acquire the S-400 in October 2016, but the Times of India reports that final contractual negotiations between New Delhi and Moscow are now underway.

The S-400 has also drawn active interest from Saudi Arabia and Bahrain, with the former even signing a memorandum-of-understanding (MoU) to potentially pursue a contract. Following Turkey, it appears that Russia is making in-roads with marketing the S-400 to countries that have traditionally relied on Western weapons, especially for big-ticket/high-cost requirements such as long-range air defence.

However, in the cases of Turkey and Saudi Arabia, the S-400 would be in relative proximity to Western air defence systems. Turkey’s issues with NATO aside, even Saudi Arabia would have a comparable concern seeing that it is also seeking the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system. In such cases, the S-400 would be operated in a parallel or stand-alone format, but concerns surrounding the exposure and leaks (to Russia and/or the U.S.) of system radio frequencies from both systems remain.

https://quwa.org/2018/01/21/russia-reportedly-begins-delivering-s-400-systems-to-china/?utm_source=Quwa+Free&utm_campaign=7f68503c1a-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_290f015d1a-7f68503c1a-206475549
 

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China's top paper says U.S. forcing China to accelerate South China Sea deployments
JANUARY 22, 2018

BEIJING (Reuters) - China’s top newspaper, decrying Washington as a trouble-maker, said on Monday U.S. moves in the South China Sea like last week’s freedom of navigation operation will only cause China to strengthen its deployments in the disputed waterway.

China’s foreign ministry said the USS Hopper, a destroyer, came within 12 nautical miles of Huangyan island, which is better known as the Scarborough Shoal and is subject to a rival claim by the Philippines, a historic ally of the United States.

It was the latest U.S. naval operation challenging extensive Chinese claims in the South China Sea and came even as President Donald Trump’s administration seeks Chinese cooperation in dealing with North Korea’s missile and nuclear programs.

The ruling Communist Party’s official People’s Daily said in a commentary that, with the situation generally improving in the South China Sea, it was clear that the United States was the one militarizing the region.

“Against this backdrop of peace and cooperation, a U.S. ship wantonly provoking trouble is singleminded to the point of recklessness,” the paper said.

“If the relevant party once more makes trouble out of nothing and causes tensions, then it will only cause China to reach this conclusion: in order to earnestly protect peace in the South China Sea, China must strengthen and speed up the building of its abilities there,” it said.

The commentary was published under the pen name “Zhong Sheng”, meaning “Voice of China”, which is often used to give the paper’s view on foreign policy issues.

The widely read Global Times tabloid, published by the People’s Daily, said in an editorial on Monday China’s control of the South China Sea is only growing and it is well placed to react to U.S. “provocations”.

“As China’s military size and quality improve, so does its control of the South China Sea,” it said. “China is able to send more naval vessels as a response and can take steps like militarizing islands.”

The Scarborough Shoal is located within the Philippines’ 200 nautical mile Exclusive Economic Zone but an international tribunal in 2016 ruled that it is a traditional fishing ground that no one country has sole rights to exploit.

The U.S. military says it carries out “freedom of navigation” operations throughout the world, including in areas claimed by allies, and that they are separate from political considerations.

The Pentagon has not commented directly on the latest patrol but said such operations are routine.

Reporting by Ben Blanchard; Editing by Paul Tait

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-southchinasea-china-usa/chinas-top-paper-says-u-s-forcing-china-to-accelerate-south-china-sea-deployments-idUSKBN1FB033
 

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No slowdown for China’s Navy aspirations
By: Mike Yeo
24 Jan 2018
Chinese J-15 fighter jets are launched from the deck of the Liaoning aircraft carrier during military drills in the South China Sea on Jan. 2, 2017. (STR/AFP via Getty Images)

MELBOURNE, Australia — China’s carrier aviation programs continue apace with the focus starting to shift toward the development and introduction of training and specialized aircraft as China’s first domestically built carrier approaches the start of sea trials.

The reported decision to proceed with China’s version of the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System will also have an impact on these programs, and will allow China’s People’s Liberation Army Navy, or PLAN, to operate a wider variety of aircraft from onboard its carriers, allowing it to have better-rounded carrier air wings and enhance its capabilities.

Flying Shark growth

Currently, the PLAN only has a single type of fixed-wing carrierborne aircraft in service. This is the Shenyang J-15 Flying Shark multirole fighter. The J-15 is one of several Chinese-developed derivatives of Russia’s Sukhoi Su-27 Flanker family. Like the land-based J-11 and J-16, the J-15s are equipped with indigenous avionics and weapons, although the engines are still the Russian Saturn AL-31 turbofans.

Approximately two dozen J-15s have been produced so far in two production batches, and these are currently only able to operate from the ski jump-equipped Liaoning aircraft carrier and the Type 002 carrier being fitted out in the city of Dalian.

China is known to have at least one of the six J-15 prototypes fitted with catapult launch accessories on its nose landing gear, and the country is carrying out catapult tests with this aircraft, using what are believed to be a steam catapult and EMALS at an air base near Huludao, Liaoning province in northern China.

In addition, China is developing a twin-seat variant of the J-15, with at least a single prototype known to be flying from Shenyang Aircraft Corporation’s facilities located in its namesake city. It is likely this variant, designated the J-15S, will operate from the future, catapult-equipped carrier China will build after the Type 002 as a two-seat multirole fighter alongside single-seat J-15s, much like the mix of single-seat Boeing F/A-18E Super Hornets and twin-seat F/A-18Fs onboard a typical U.S. Navy carrier air wing.

Future production batches of J-15s are also expected to be fitted with more modern avionics, such as those already fitted to the J-16 fighter that will included an active electronically scanned array radar.

The electronic warfare/electronic attack technology being developed for a specialized variant of the J-16 may also be introduced on the J-15.

However, these are unlikely to be fielded in the near term, but rather are expected to enter service in the early part of the next decade, at the earliest.


Improved pilot training

The PLAN is also revamping its pilot training program with the intention of streamlining the process of training its pilots. The service sees an urgent need for 400 new pilots in the coming years with the introduction of new land- and carrier-based aircraft types. Last year, China merged the naval aviation academy and its aeronautical and astronautical university into the Naval Aeronautical University.

The move will also reduce dependence on the People’s Liberation Army Air Force for basic pilot training, while the introduction of the Hongdu JL-10H lead-in fighter trainer also simplifies the pilot training syllabus. The JL-10H — with superior avionics and performance to the earlier Guizhou JL-9 jet trainer previously used by the PLAN — will be able to shorten the training of the PLAN’s fighter pilots from three to two phases.

However, the PLAN lacks a dedicated trainer aircraft used to qualify carrier pilots, with the J-15 currently being used in this role. An attempt was made to develop a carrier trainer version of the JL-9 for this purpose, but this was unsuccessful; reports suggest the JL-9’s fuselage was unable to cope with the stress involved in arrested landings onboard carriers.

It is unknown if an attempt will be made to develop a variant of the JL-10H for such a purpose, although such a move would make sense because a dedicated carrier trainer aircraft would have the advantages of lower operating costs, a more streamlined pilot training process and a reduction in demands on the J-15 fleet.

EMALS and more aircraft

As Defense News previously reported, if China were to build its third carrier equipped with an EMALS as expected, the PLAN will be able to operate a wider variety of aircraft from its carriers, opening up the possibility of equipping its air wings with an aircraft similar to the Northrop Grumman E-2 Hawkeye airborne early-warning aircraft.

The PLAN’s current shipboard airborne early-warning asset is the Changhe Z-8 helicopter fitted with a radar that can be stowed when not in use. However, compared to a fixed-wing aircraft, an airborne early-warning helicopter has severe shortcomings in endurance, which reduces the asset’s time on station, and in operating altitude, which reduces the effectiveness of the radar.

China previously built a mock-up of a Xi’an Y-7 with a heavily modified tailplane and a radar rotodome on top of its fuselage around the year 2010. Yet, there has been no further development of that project since then.

A similar mock-up was seen on the carrier flight deck test bed at a naval testing facility in Wuhan, Hubei province, in early 2017, indicating that China is still interested in developing such a platform.

https://www.defensenews.com/naval/2018/01/23/no-slowdown-for-chinas-navy-aspirations/
 

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Chinese aircraft trespasses South Korea, Japan airspace
By Elizabeth Shim
| Jan. 29, 2018

South Korea fighter jets, the FA-50, in training on New Year's Day. Seoul said fighter jets were scrambled following a Chinese incursion into Seoul's airspace. File Photo by Yonhap


Jan. 29 (UPI) -- South Korea scrambled fighter jets after a Chinese military aircraft trespassed into the Korean Air Defense Identification Zone, or KADIZ, according to Seoul.

South Korea's joint chiefs of staff said one Chinese aircraft entered territorial airspace, local newspaper Asia Business reported Monday.

"Today at 9:30 a.m. we detected a military aircraft of Chinese origin entering the KADIZ from the southwest side, near Ieodo Island," the joint chiefs stated, according to Yonhap.

"We immediately deployed our air force fighters."

Ieodo Island, or Socotra Rock, is a submerged rock in the Yellow Sea that is also claimed by China.

The joint chiefs added the Chinese plane left KADIZ at 9:55 a.m., then cruised through Japan's Air Defense Identification Zone, or JADIZ.

The Chinese aircraft left both airspaces by 2:05 p.m., Seoul said.

South Korea stated they are still investigating the incursion, but the Chinese plane is either a Shaanxi Y-8, a medium-size transport aircraft, or an electronic warfare plane.

"We are still confirming the exact model," Seoul said.

The joint chiefs of staff also said South Korean fighter jets were deployed until the "final departure" of the Chinese plane and conducted surveillance flights and "regular tactical measures."

The incident marks the first Chinese military incursion into South Korean airspace in 40 days

On Dec. 18, South Korea scrambled fighter jets after five Chinese military aircraft entered the country's Air Defense Identification Zone.

https://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2018/01/29/Chinese-aircraft-trespasses-South-Korea-Japan-airspace/3221517236134/?nll=1
 

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China ramps up production of new airborne early warning aircraft
By: Mike Yeo  
05.02.2018

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China has ramped up production of its newest airborne early warning aircraft, Shaanxi KJ-500, in what an expert on Chinese military aviation says is a sign of the platform’s maturity. (China's Ministry of National Defense)

SINGAPORE – China has ramped up production of its newest airborne early warning aircraft, in what an expert on Chinese military aviation says is a sign of the platform’s maturity.
Recent satellite photos show eight Shaanxi KJ-500 airborne early warning and control, or AEW&C aircraft at the company’s factory airfield at Hanzhong, Shaanxi Province in mid-December 2017. The aircraft were undergoing testing before delivery to China’s military.
These aircraft will join at least four KJ-500s already in service with China’s People’s Liberation Army Air Force or PLAAF and a similar number already in service with the naval aviation units, according to Andreas Rupprecht, who has authored several books on China’s military aviation and industry.

Three People’s Liberation Army Navy, or PLAN, KJ-500s were seen on satellite photos of the airbase at Lingshui on the Chinese island province of Hainan by December 2017, on the fringes of the South China Sea. Satellite imagery released by Stratfor has also revealed the PLAAF has deployed KJ-500s to Lhasa-Gonggar Airport in Tibet, 200 miles from the Doklam Plateau where a standoff between Chinese and Indian troops over the disputed border occurred in 2017.

Rupprecht told Defense News the dramatic ramp up of KJ-500 is part of pattern of similar increases in production of the Y-9 turboprop airlifter and its derivatives, which include anti-submarine, electronic warfare, and other intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance variants, adding that this is an indication that the KJ-500 design is mature enough to be the standard AEW&C platform in both the PLAAF and PLAN.

The KJ-500 has a fixed dorsal rotodome containing three radar arrays each containing active electronically scanned array or AESA radars arranged in a triangular configuration to give full 360° coverage. The new radar design supplants the “balance beam” design used on the earlier Shaanxi KJ-200 AEW&C aircraft.

The radar is reportedly designed by China’s 38th Research Institute of the China Electronics Technology Group Corporation, and is said to be smaller and lighter than the rotodome fitted on China’s KJ-2000 AEW&C platform based on the Russian Ilyushin Il-76 jet airlifter. China has built four KJ-2000s and at least 11 KJ-200s based on the Y-8 airlifter, with both types entering service in the mid-2000s.

https://www.defensenews.com/digital-show-dailies/singapore-airshow/2018/02/05/china-ramps-up-production-of-new-airborne-early-warning-aircraft/
 

Joe Shearer

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This is scary, from the Indian point of view. The KJ-2000s, as well as their development of Y-9 aircraft as sensing, e-warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platforms, and as weapons platforms, are force multipliers; their already formidable arsenals of advanced fighter aircraft, and their defensive missile networks, will gain tremendously in coordination, streamlining of activity and outreach due to these platforms. As it is, their production of the essential attack units - fighter and attack aircraft for the air force, destroyers, frigates and submarines for the navy, and tanks and infantry oriented vehicles, besides basic artillery, tubed and tubeless, for the army - keeps pouring out a seemingly limitless output.

I do not know that a purely confrontational attitude is a useful one in these circumstances.
 

Eagle1

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This is scary, from the Indian point of view. The KJ-2000s, as well as their development of Y-9 aircraft as sensing, e-warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platforms, and as weapons platforms, are force multipliers; their already formidable arsenals of advanced fighter aircraft, and their defensive missile networks, will gain tremendously in coordination, streamlining of activity and outreach due to these platforms. As it is, their production of the essential attack units - fighter and attack aircraft for the air force, destroyers, frigates and submarines for the navy, and tanks and infantry oriented vehicles, besides basic artillery, tubed and tubeless, for the army - keeps pouring out a seemingly limitless output.

I do not know that a purely confrontational attitude is a useful one in these circumstances.
Very well said, since they are more interested in trade, an not confrontation, implementing others doctrine is not in India's interest. A min. credible deterrent is good enough. The money wasted on aircraft carriers, sqdns upon sqdns of cutting edge a/c's, tanks in the thousands, could be well spent on healthcare, education, housing and sanitation.

Lets say, India becomes a regional super power with 3+ aircraft carriers, etc etc, but people who have are the bottom of the hierarchy still like this, what have you achieved?

3c5a3355homelesspeopleinDelhi2.jpg
mumbai-homeless.jpg
 

Indus Falcon

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Very well said, since they are more interested in trade, an not confrontation, implementing others doctrine is not in India's interest. A min. credible deterrent is good enough. The money wasted on aircraft carriers, sqdns upon sqdns of cutting edge a/c's, tanks in the thousands, could be well spent on healthcare, education, housing and sanitation.

Lets say, India becomes a regional super power with 3+ aircraft carriers, etc etc, but people who have are the bottom of the hierarchy still like this, what have you achieved?

View attachment 5493View attachment 5494
I agree, the Subcontinent should first focus on improving human lives / reducing poverty, that should be first priority, nothing else!
 

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