China targeted by ISIS

Scorpion

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China targeted by ISIS



As the Western US lead coalition allies are dragging their feet trying to curb ISIS operations in the Middle East, it seems that the coveted "boots on the ground" could eventually come from the east - where China faces a growing ISIS-inspired subversive activity in the strategic Xinjiang province.




The map published by ISIS in July shows the ultimate goals of the Islamic Chaliphate. Claimed as part of the ‘Wilayat of Khurasan’, are parts of western China, as well as India and Sri-lanka, Pakistan and Iran, the Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. Since this map was drawn additional groups in South-East Asia – Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Philippines have joined ISIS.
The latest development in the creation of the revived Islamic Caliphate comes out of China. On 4 July 2014, ISISleader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi effectively declared war on China by publishing a map of its aspirant caliphate that threatened to occupy China’s Xinjiang, and named China first in a list of 20 countries that had “seized Muslim rights.” China’s Uighur Muslim population is known predominantly in the western regions of the country, which is often marginalized by the officially atheist Chinese government.



Yin Gang, a West Asian and African Studies scholar at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, reported in a western news media, that hundreds of Chinese nationals are currently fighting for the Islamic State, citing previous examples of Chinese citizens joining al-Qaeda in Afghanistan. It is becoming apparent that Uighurseparatists are joining ISIS in the Middle East.



A group photo of foreign volunteers fighting with ISIS showing at least two unidentified but unmasked Chinese fighters.

Shown in a video released by ISIS supporters on Youtube, this person, identified as ‘Bo Wang’ was the first Chinese national openly shown to be fighting with ISIS in Syria.
For the Uighur in Xinjiang province, the Muslim, Islam religion is an important part of their life and identity. Their language is related to Turkish, and they regard themselves as culturally and ethnically close to Central Asian nations.

The region has had intermittent autonomy and occasional independence, but what is now known as Xinjiang came under Chinese rule in the 18th Century. The Uighur culture leans more towards Central Asia than China and the recent Islamic developments have already created spells of unrest in the province. As result, Uighur commercial and cultural activities have been gradually curtailed by the Chinese state.

Many of the Uighur do not identify as Chinese and have long been resentful of China’s heavy-handed policies. Indeed, Uighur terror cells have already been active in China.

With Xinjiang comprising the furthest eastern flank of the planned caliphate, Chinese strategists will now have to worry about how ISIS’s pivot east will impact China’s energy security and its own march west across the new silk roads to the Greater Middle East. Although the Beijing government is maintaining strict security measures on all information, recent Photos are nevertheless circulating online in China of what is suspected to be Chinese citizens fighting for the Islamic State militant group ISIS. Though the photos initially surfaced some time ago, there still has been no official confirmation on the identity or nationality of the suspects, nor any indication as to where these photos were taken.

However, unofficial sources in Beijing already expect Iraqi oil supply to figure heavily into its energy policy towards the Middle East, with China’s most productive upstream activities in the Middle East located in that region.

As the United States and its Coalition allies are still dragging their feet in activities trying to curb ISIS operations, it seems that placing “boots on the ground” will eventually come from the Far East and Chinese forces might become the first candidates if ISIS will continue its subversive activities in the strategic Xinjiang province.

China’s military forces, especially in number of fighting infantry cannot be underestimated. Numbering some 2.3 million active duty soldiers, with approximately 1 million reservists and some 15 million militia it is a huge force to be reckoned with in any confrontation which Beijing will decide to deploy.

China’s foreign policy has traditionally been based upon an attitude of non-intervention. Their policy was codified in 1953 and later added to the Preamble of the Chinese Constitution. The fact is, that China’s primary objective is stability, and from their perspective, the surest way to destabilize a region is by intervening militarily. However, despite its best efforts to do otherwise, China will soon find itself entangled in the messy international struggle against Islamic-fundamentalist movements, once ISIS or its Muslim affiliates increase their active presence in China, or threaten its economic and strategic interests.

Because of its economic interests in the region, China has recently deviated slightly from its non-interventionist policies by expressing support for anti-ISIS military activities.

However, threats to its economic interests should be the least of China’s concerns. This is because ISIS is currently the greatest actual security threat China faces in the world. Chinese Muslim Uighur separatists have been joining ISIS in Iraq and Syria. Eventually (if not already) these battle-hardened Uighur separatists will begin to make their way back into China and open a campaign of terrorism on a scale previously unimaginable in China. In order to stem the flow of training, support, and weaponry coming back over its borders via the ISIS-trained Uighur, China’s largely untested military will have to gain needed combat experience, to be effective in counter terror activities. And time is already running out fast in China itself. The Muslim Uighur who have joined ISIS are receiving an elite education in terrorism and combat. They are building a valuable network of different Muslim extremist groups who can supply them with weapons, as well as logistical and ideological support. Perhaps the most significant lessons being taught to the Uighur extremists is in organization.

Things have escalated in 2009, with large-scale ethnic rioting in the regional capital, Urumqi. Some 200 people were killed in the unrest, most of them Han Chinese, an ethnic group making the majority of mainland China.

A most spectacular terror attack happened right in China’s Beijing’s Tiananmen Square in October 2013, when a suicide bomber drove his car into a crowd killing several people. Another such incident happened on May 2014 when two cars ploughed into a market in Urumqi and terrorists threw explosives killing and wounding scores of civilians.


In August 2014 China has executed eight people for “terrorist” attacks in its restive far western region of Xinjiang, including three who “masterminded” a dramatic car crash in Tiananmen Square in 2013, state media said.

Although maintaining its traditional non-intervention policy in Mid Eastern conflicts, China is already showing uncharacteristic support for foreign military actions against ISIS. Even more unusual is China’s open support for US airstrikes in Iraq and Syria. So far, the Chinese policy remained virtually unchanged regarding any active intervention, but this could change rapidly once ISIS-trained Uighur extremists begin to trickle back into China. Then the Chinese government will find itself battling an entirely different element.

Once this happens, the world can expect to see a China that is much more willing to involve itself in military intervention, creating a historic precedent for China in international disputes. This willingness to use force will have profound implications on China’s ongoing territorial disputes with surrounding Asian nations, in which Pyongyang has already been flexing its military might in this context.

Should the influence of ISIS escalate into an organized terror threat inside China, one can expect a new military superpower, as China expands its military capabilities into unknown proportions.

China targeted by ISIS | Defense Update:
 

Peachdejour

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I think this was a very dumb move for ISIS. However, I think it will be entertaining to see how China responds to this "threat." They will either put "boots on the ground" or they will blow it off as if it matters very little to them. This is something I will have to keep an eye on.
 

Gabriel

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China doesn't tolerate anyone interfering in how they run the country, so I am all for them to use all their might to oust ISIS and destroy them. They are ruthless enough to do it and don't care about any Human Right violations and they have the manpower and weapons.
 

Peachdejour

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China doesn't tolerate anyone interfering in how they run the country, so I am all for them to use all their might to oust ISIS and destroy them. They are ruthless enough to do it and don't care about any Human Right violations and they have the manpower and weapons.
I see it the same way. I don't think many countries will intervene if China decides they are going to put an end to ISIS and their delusions.
 

weepforsweep

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I would love to see China obliterate ISIS. It will save the United States some trouble from having to send troops. These guys need to be taking out as soon as possible.
 

diprod

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China doesn't tolerate anyone interfering in how they run the country, so I am all for them to use all their might to oust ISIS and destroy them. They are ruthless enough to do it and don't care about any Human Right violations and they have the manpower and weapons.
I say yes to this. And there are billions of them who are way too adamant for such conversion and taking over. I don't see ISIS being powerful in this country at all.

I would love to see China obliterate ISIS. It will save the United States some trouble from having to send troops. These guys need to be taking out as soon as possible.
It is going to be an interesting picture to see how China would take down ISIS. This is something the world and the US could learn from them. They are not push overs on this subject.
 

Gelsemium

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I think this was a very dumb move for ISIS. However, I think it will be entertaining to see how China responds to this "threat." They will either put "boots on the ground" or they will blow it off as if it matters very little to them. This is something I will have to keep an eye on.
I think that they are not known for being smart, the are just extremist, they don't fear death and their actions prove it. Scary to see that my country appear in black in that map, I just hope they keep away.
 

Peachdejour

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I think that they are not known for being smart, the are just extremist, they don't fear death and their actions prove it. Scary to see that my country appear in black in that map, I just hope they keep away.
I hope that they keep away for your sake, as well. I guess you are right when it comes to them not being know for being smart. I think they have only gotten as far as they have because they took the world by surprise. It's like that black squirrel that runs into the house under your feet and causes havoc in your house while you are trying to swat it out with a broom. Eventually, you shoo it out the door, but it leaves a mess to clean up.
 

xTinx

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I won't say "Serves you right, China!" but this situation is a challenge for the "sleeping giant." Since its foray into the bigger markets, China couldn't stop boasting about its "power." I guess this is the perfect time to show off their military prowess and join the fight to eradicate ISIS and put an end to their murderous Islamic ideology (I doubt they're actually following the real Islamic teachings).
 

Mackmax

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Like Weepforsweep said, hopefully China can whoop ISIS so that the U.S doesn't have to worry about them any longer. This is the break we need, and would be a weight lifted off our shoulders. After the ISIS terrorist attack in Australia, I feared that ISIS would be targeting weaker countries, but I'm glad this is not the case.
 
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I don't think China will have any problems in wiping ISIS off the map, so to say, if China were to put boots on the ground. However, I don't see China doing that any time soon. When was the last time China sent troops to fight in other peoples' wars. Yes, the unrest in certain parts of China are related to the way the Chinese government had been treating the Muslims there, but, as far as I know, China considers that an internal affair and they will deal with it in their own way.
 

DeltaForce103

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They might as well declare war on the moon. A ragtag band of terrorists might be able to claim a significant amount of territory and victories in a civil war-ravaged, destabilized region with crippled infrastructure amidst countless other militant outfits vying for power. But invading even a small nation state with a trained and disciplined standing army and comparatively enormous resources and military technology is entirely different.

But proposing to fight both India and China on two fronts? That is nothing short of sheer and utter insanity.
 
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China doesn't tolerate anyone interfering in how they run the country, so I am all for them to use all their might to oust ISIS and destroy them. They are ruthless enough to do it and don't care about any Human Right violations and they have the manpower and weapons.
I agree. I really doubt China is going to put up with this. Knowing China they'll find a way to deal with it, and hopefully it won't blow up in their faces. Hopefully nothing goes wrong. And I definitely agree with those above me with their comments saying that I definitely hope that China just takes care of ISIS and stops them for good now, so that the United States doesn't have to get any more involved with this matter and we don't have to deal with it anymore in our country!
 

Gelsemium

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I hope that they keep away for your sake, as well. I guess you are right when it comes to them not being know for being smart. I think they have only gotten as far as they have because they took the world by surprise. It's like that black squirrel that runs into the house under your feet and causes havoc in your house while you are trying to swat it out with a broom. Eventually, you shoo it out the door, but it leaves a mess to clean up.
Thanks and yes, that's pretty much it, the world didn't saw them as a menace because they were making war away from us, but now they kill our citizens and they menace our countries so they deserve to be treated like a real menace.
 

Kamarsun1

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China targeted by ISIS



As the Western US lead coalition allies are dragging their feet trying to curb ISIS operations in the Middle East, it seems that the coveted "boots on the ground" could eventually come from the east - where China faces a growing ISIS-inspired subversive activity in the strategic Xinjiang province.




The map published by ISIS in July shows the ultimate goals of the Islamic Chaliphate. Claimed as part of the ‘Wilayat of Khurasan’, are parts of western China, as well as India and Sri-lanka, Pakistan and Iran, the Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. Since this map was drawn additional groups in South-East Asia – Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Philippines have joined ISIS.
The latest development in the creation of the revived Islamic Caliphate comes out of China. On 4 July 2014, ISISleader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi effectively declared war on China by publishing a map of its aspirant caliphate that threatened to occupy China’s Xinjiang, and named China first in a list of 20 countries that had “seized Muslim rights.” China’s Uighur Muslim population is known predominantly in the western regions of the country, which is often marginalized by the officially atheist Chinese government.



Yin Gang, a West Asian and African Studies scholar at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, reported in a western news media, that hundreds of Chinese nationals are currently fighting for the Islamic State, citing previous examples of Chinese citizens joining al-Qaeda in Afghanistan. It is becoming apparent that Uighurseparatists are joining ISIS in the Middle East.



A group photo of foreign volunteers fighting with ISIS showing at least two unidentified but unmasked Chinese fighters.

Shown in a video released by ISIS supporters on Youtube, this person, identified as ‘Bo Wang’ was the first Chinese national openly shown to be fighting with ISIS in Syria.
For the Uighur in Xinjiang province, the Muslim, Islam religion is an important part of their life and identity. Their language is related to Turkish, and they regard themselves as culturally and ethnically close to Central Asian nations.

The region has had intermittent autonomy and occasional independence, but what is now known as Xinjiang came under Chinese rule in the 18th Century. The Uighur culture leans more towards Central Asia than China and the recent Islamic developments have already created spells of unrest in the province. As result, Uighur commercial and cultural activities have been gradually curtailed by the Chinese state.

Many of the Uighur do not identify as Chinese and have long been resentful of China’s heavy-handed policies. Indeed, Uighur terror cells have already been active in China.

With Xinjiang comprising the furthest eastern flank of the planned caliphate, Chinese strategists will now have to worry about how ISIS’s pivot east will impact China’s energy security and its own march west across the new silk roads to the Greater Middle East. Although the Beijing government is maintaining strict security measures on all information, recent Photos are nevertheless circulating online in China of what is suspected to be Chinese citizens fighting for the Islamic State militant group ISIS. Though the photos initially surfaced some time ago, there still has been no official confirmation on the identity or nationality of the suspects, nor any indication as to where these photos were taken.

However, unofficial sources in Beijing already expect Iraqi oil supply to figure heavily into its energy policy towards the Middle East, with China’s most productive upstream activities in the Middle East located in that region.

As the United States and its Coalition allies are still dragging their feet in activities trying to curb ISIS operations, it seems that placing “boots on the ground” will eventually come from the Far East and Chinese forces might become the first candidates if ISIS will continue its subversive activities in the strategic Xinjiang province.

China’s military forces, especially in number of fighting infantry cannot be underestimated. Numbering some 2.3 million active duty soldiers, with approximately 1 million reservists and some 15 million militia it is a huge force to be reckoned with in any confrontation which Beijing will decide to deploy.

China’s foreign policy has traditionally been based upon an attitude of non-intervention. Their policy was codified in 1953 and later added to the Preamble of the Chinese Constitution. The fact is, that China’s primary objective is stability, and from their perspective, the surest way to destabilize a region is by intervening militarily. However, despite its best efforts to do otherwise, China will soon find itself entangled in the messy international struggle against Islamic-fundamentalist movements, once ISIS or its Muslim affiliates increase their active presence in China, or threaten its economic and strategic interests.

Because of its economic interests in the region, China has recently deviated slightly from its non-interventionist policies by expressing support for anti-ISIS military activities.

However, threats to its economic interests should be the least of China’s concerns. This is because ISIS is currently the greatest actual security threat China faces in the world. Chinese Muslim Uighur separatists have been joining ISIS in Iraq and Syria. Eventually (if not already) these battle-hardened Uighur separatists will begin to make their way back into China and open a campaign of terrorism on a scale previously unimaginable in China. In order to stem the flow of training, support, and weaponry coming back over its borders via the ISIS-trained Uighur, China’s largely untested military will have to gain needed combat experience, to be effective in counter terror activities. And time is already running out fast in China itself. The Muslim Uighur who have joined ISIS are receiving an elite education in terrorism and combat. They are building a valuable network of different Muslim extremist groups who can supply them with weapons, as well as logistical and ideological support. Perhaps the most significant lessons being taught to the Uighur extremists is in organization.

Things have escalated in 2009, with large-scale ethnic rioting in the regional capital, Urumqi. Some 200 people were killed in the unrest, most of them Han Chinese, an ethnic group making the majority of mainland China.

A most spectacular terror attack happened right in China’s Beijing’s Tiananmen Square in October 2013, when a suicide bomber drove his car into a crowd killing several people. Another such incident happened on May 2014 when two cars ploughed into a market in Urumqi and terrorists threw explosives killing and wounding scores of civilians.


In August 2014 China has executed eight people for “terrorist” attacks in its restive far western region of Xinjiang, including three who “masterminded” a dramatic car crash in Tiananmen Square in 2013, state media said.

Although maintaining its traditional non-intervention policy in Mid Eastern conflicts, China is already showing uncharacteristic support for foreign military actions against ISIS. Even more unusual is China’s open support for US airstrikes in Iraq and Syria. So far, the Chinese policy remained virtually unchanged regarding any active intervention, but this could change rapidly once ISIS-trained Uighur extremists begin to trickle back into China. Then the Chinese government will find itself battling an entirely different element.

Once this happens, the world can expect to see a China that is much more willing to involve itself in military intervention, creating a historic precedent for China in international disputes. This willingness to use force will have profound implications on China’s ongoing territorial disputes with surrounding Asian nations, in which Pyongyang has already been flexing its military might in this context.

Should the influence of ISIS escalate into an organized terror threat inside China, one can expect a new military superpower, as China expands its military capabilities into unknown proportions.

China targeted by ISIS | Defense Update:
I didn't know China was an officially atheist nation. Why would ISIS want to battle China? China has way to many people and resources, that's a losing battle. I do believe that some people in China are upset with some of the actions of the government, but it's a difficult task to tear the system down.
 
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