European Next Generation Fighter | World Defense

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Germany to take up European next-gen fighter funding next week
By: Sebastian Sprenger  
29 May 2019


German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen (in red) and French Defense Minister Florence Parly (in white) look at a Eurofighter Typhoon fighter jet at the ILA Berlin Air Show on April 26, 2018, in Schoenefeld, Germany. The aircraft is scheduled to be replaced by the Future Combat Air System sometime around 2040. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

MADRID – With Spain on track to join a German-French quest for a new European combat aircraft, lawmakers in Germany next week are expected to decide on Berlin’s initial funding contribution.

June 5 will be the last penultimate session of the Bundestag’s defense and budget committees before the parliamentary summer break begins in late June. It is also the last opportunity to secure approval for a €65 million study contract for the Future Combat Air System before the June 16-23 Paris Air Show. German and French officials envision some level of pomp and circumstance at the event to cement their ambitious sixth-generation fighter plans.

For now, the idea is to have a framework agreement signed by the two defense ministers, Florence Parly and Ursula von der Leyen, even if a final okay by German lawmakers was still outstanding. In that case, a contingency clause would be added to the text to reflect that the pact is preliminary until Germany’s legislature approves it.

Defense officials in Berlin said they expect parliamentary approval eventually, but acknowledged that the timing is tight.

Meanwhile, staffs are working behind the scenes to modify the slate of program governance documents to reflect Spain’s participation. It remains to be seen whether those tweaks, which include questions of intellectual property ownership, can be sorted out in time to warrant a senior-level Spanish government representative joining the festivities at Paris.

A German defense spokesman stressed that Spain's participation in FCAS program was assured, and that only legal matters had yet to the sorted out.
In that spirit, Germany's choice to lead a delegation to the inaugural FEINDEF defense expo here appears apt: Luftwaffe Brig. Gen. Gerald Funke, who also oversees FCAS planning for Germany, could be spotted at the opening event.

If the Bundestag approves, fully integration Spain into the program would amount to addressing the “devil in the details,” he told Defense News.
Airbus and Dassault are the main contractors for the ambitious air-warfare program. Including Spain likely would mean Airbus, which has a sizable footprint here, would reshuffle its share of work to include Spanish industry.

 

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Industrial agreement, offers delivered to France and Germany: Dassault Aviation and Airbus achieve next decisive milestone for Future Combat Air System programme

June 17, 2019
8194






  • Industrial agreement on demonstrator programmes covers core elements of a Future Combat Air System: a New Generation Fighter, Remote Carriers and an Air Combat Cloud
  • Joint industry proposals for the first phase demonstrators delivered to the French Defence Procurement Agency DGA and the German Ministry of Defence
  • Industry committed to ambitious demonstration programme with cutting-edge technologies, and first real flight by 2026
  • Reveal of first concept models for new Generation Fighter and Remote Carriers



Le Bourget, 17 June 2019 – Dassault Aviation and Airbus SE have delivered a joint industrial proposal to the governments of France and Germany for the first Demonstrator Phase of the Future Combat Air System (FCAS). This next major milestone achievement in the programme was showcased by the reveal of the New Generation Fighter and Remote Carriers models to a world public on the opening day of the 2019 Paris Air Show. The reveal of the models by Eric Trappier, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Dassault Aviation and Dirk Hoke, CEO of Airbus Defence and Space was witnessed by the host of the opening ceremony at Le Bourget airport, President of the French Republic, Emmanuel Macron, and the French Minister of the Armed Forces, Florence Parly, the German Federal Minister of Defence, Ursula Von Der Leyen and the Spanish Minister of Defence, Margarita Robles.

This Demonstrator Phase will cover the period between 2019 and mid-2021 and will serve as a starting point for demonstrators and technology development for a New Generation Fighter (NGF), Remote Carriers (RC) and an Air Combat Cloud (ACC) to fly by 2026. The various teaming agreements, which also include the companies MBDA Systems and Thales, contain a defined scope of planning of the first Demonstrator Phase, ways of working and commercial agreements. Additionally, a transparent and fair handling of Intellectual Property Rights has been established in the respective teaming agreements. In parallel, Safran and MTU are in charge of developing a New Engine.

“The Joint Concept Study awarded to Dassault Aviation and Airbus in January 2019 was the first step in a fruitful cooperation between both companies. The first Demonstrator Phase marks another decisive step in the Next Generation Weapon System industrial organisation in which the New Generation Fighter, to be built by Dassault and Airbus, with Dassault Aviation as Prime contractor, as well as the Remote Carriers and Air Combat Cloud with Airbus as Prime contractor, will be the corner stone of the Future Combat Air System”, said Eric Trappier, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Dassault Aviation. “The progress we have achieved on the FCAS programme in recent months is remarkable. It will shape Europe’s most decisive military air combat programme for the decades to come and turn out a strong move in constructing Europe’s sovereignty.”

Dirk Hoke, Chief Executive Officer of Airbus Defence and Space, said: “I am very satisfied with the level of trust and partnership we have built with Dassault already in the execution of the Joint Concept Study, and now with the industrial proposal we’ve submitted to the both governments. The principles of our industrial cooperation include joint decision making, a clear governance set-up, transparent ways of working, and a common preparation and negotiation of this first phase of the demonstrator activities.”

After initiating the negotiation phase through the delivered proposal, Dassault Aviation and Airbus expect a contract award for the first Demonstrator Phase by Q4 2019.


 

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Industrial agreement, offers delivered to France and Germany: Dassault Aviation and Airbus achieve next decisive milestone for Future Combat Air System programme

June 17, 2019
View attachment 8194





  • Industrial agreement on demonstrator programmes covers core elements of a Future Combat Air System: a New Generation Fighter, Remote Carriers and an Air Combat Cloud
  • Joint industry proposals for the first phase demonstrators delivered to the French Defence Procurement Agency DGA and the German Ministry of Defence
  • Industry committed to ambitious demonstration programme with cutting-edge technologies, and first real flight by 2026
  • Reveal of first concept models for new Generation Fighter and Remote Carriers



Le Bourget, 17 June 2019 – Dassault Aviation and Airbus SE have delivered a joint industrial proposal to the governments of France and Germany for the first Demonstrator Phase of the Future Combat Air System (FCAS). This next major milestone achievement in the programme was showcased by the reveal of the New Generation Fighter and Remote Carriers models to a world public on the opening day of the 2019 Paris Air Show. The reveal of the models by Eric Trappier, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Dassault Aviation and Dirk Hoke, CEO of Airbus Defence and Space was witnessed by the host of the opening ceremony at Le Bourget airport, President of the French Republic, Emmanuel Macron, and the French Minister of the Armed Forces, Florence Parly, the German Federal Minister of Defence, Ursula Von Der Leyen and the Spanish Minister of Defence, Margarita Robles.

This Demonstrator Phase will cover the period between 2019 and mid-2021 and will serve as a starting point for demonstrators and technology development for a New Generation Fighter (NGF), Remote Carriers (RC) and an Air Combat Cloud (ACC) to fly by 2026. The various teaming agreements, which also include the companies MBDA Systems and Thales, contain a defined scope of planning of the first Demonstrator Phase, ways of working and commercial agreements. Additionally, a transparent and fair handling of Intellectual Property Rights has been established in the respective teaming agreements. In parallel, Safran and MTU are in charge of developing a New Engine.

“The Joint Concept Study awarded to Dassault Aviation and Airbus in January 2019 was the first step in a fruitful cooperation between both companies. The first Demonstrator Phase marks another decisive step in the Next Generation Weapon System industrial organisation in which the New Generation Fighter, to be built by Dassault and Airbus, with Dassault Aviation as Prime contractor, as well as the Remote Carriers and Air Combat Cloud with Airbus as Prime contractor, will be the corner stone of the Future Combat Air System”, said Eric Trappier, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Dassault Aviation. “The progress we have achieved on the FCAS programme in recent months is remarkable. It will shape Europe’s most decisive military air combat programme for the decades to come and turn out a strong move in constructing Europe’s sovereignty.”

Dirk Hoke, Chief Executive Officer of Airbus Defence and Space, said: “I am very satisfied with the level of trust and partnership we have built with Dassault already in the execution of the Joint Concept Study, and now with the industrial proposal we’ve submitted to the both governments. The principles of our industrial cooperation include joint decision making, a clear governance set-up, transparent ways of working, and a common preparation and negotiation of this first phase of the demonstrator activities.”

After initiating the negotiation phase through the delivered proposal, Dassault Aviation and Airbus expect a contract award for the first Demonstrator Phase by Q4 2019.


 

Khafee

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European Next Generation Fighter Pics
Eagle 1
19 June 2019
These pics and the models below, were revealed at the recent Paris Airshow.


NGF2 - Copy.JPG



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NGF1 - Copy.JPG
NGF3 - Copy.JPG
NGF4 - Copy.JPG
NGF5 - Copy.JPG
NGF8 - Copy.JPG
NGF9 - Copy.JPG
 

Khafee

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Khafee

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Is there a timeline?

What engine does it use?
 

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Will Europe's Dream of A Super Advanced Stealth Fighter Ever Come True?
September 7, 2019
by Michael Peck

There have been numerous weapons that are the fruits of European cooperation, such as the British-German-Italian Tornado jet, or the Franco-German HOT anti-tank missile. Yet Britain, Germany, Italy and France have their individual main battle tanks.

Ever since the guns fell silent in 1945, Europe has always been in third place in the global arms race.

Nations such as Britain, France and Sweden could devise weapons of clever and innovative design. But when it came to weapons technology, the innovation came from the United States and the Soviet Union/Russia, who were willing to spend vast amounts of treasure on military research and development.

But is a new generation of weapons coming that will put Europe on a par with America and Russia?

At the Paris Air Show, a model of the Future Air Combat System drew crowds. A sixth-generation fighter of Franco-German-Spanish parentage (though of largely French descent), it might be Europe’s counterpart to whatever manned jets—or drones—succeed the U.S. fifth-generation U.S. F-22 and F-35 stealth fighters, or Russia’s Su-57.

FCAS is built around futuristic concepts: stealth configuration, long-range missiles and—most importantly—manned-unmanned teaming. Like a stealth queen, the fighter will be attended by a retinue of drones that will do much of the dirty work of fighting, scouting and taking the brunt of enemy fire. The United States is working on the same concept with its Loyal Wingman program and the XQ-58 drone, a mini-F-35 lookalike that will work with manned aircraft like a pack of hunting dogs and their master.

Not to be outdone by its Continental cousins from whom it is separating, Britain is developing its own sixth-generation fighter. The laser-armed Tempest is envisioned entering service around 2035.

These advanced jets may have some advanced weapons. European defense firm MBDA unveiled some advanced missile concepts. Swarms of aircraft-launched gliders that can overwhelm a target fifty miles away, while the manned aircraft safely stand off from the fray. Stealthy, low-flying missiles that would enemy bunkers. A supersonic missile that can take out enemy aircraft, ships and air defenses.

But as Defense News reporter Christina Mackenzie described a model of the FCAS on display at the Paris Air Show, “no features were included in the stylized structure other than the general shape of a military aircraft, seemingly larger and flatter in appearance than today’s comparable fighter planes. That is likely because there isn’t much agreement about what an aerial weapon set to hit the skies in 2040 will look like.”

Which gets to the problem of a European military renaissance. There have been numerous weapons that are the fruits of European cooperation, such as the British-German-Italian Tornado jet, or the Franco-German HOT anti-tank missile. Yet Britain, Germany, Italy and France have their individual main battle tanks. Britain’s newest jet is the American-designed F-35. As Mckenzie notes, MBDA executives worry at the prospect of having to design different munitions for rival European and British next-generation fighters.

And with aging populations requiring more social services, and no more Soviet threat to unify them (though Putin’s Russia is doing its best), will the funding be there to support the development of an enormously expensive fighter like the FCAS all the way out to 2040? Does this make sense when there will inevitably be a U.S. competitor to the program? Even if America’s sixth-generation fighter turns out to be as big a boondoggle as the F-35, at least much of the cost will have been borne by American rather than European taxpayers.

 

IbnAbdullah

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The Europeans lack any serious foreseeable threat and, as the article points out, with an aging population and high social security expenditures needed it would become increasingly difficult for the EU governments to justify larger spending on military and defence.

However, as Pakistan has seen lately, you can find yourself in a dangerous situation without sufficient time to 'develop military capabilites'.


Even if America’s sixth-generation fighter turns out to be as big a boondoggle as the F-35, at least much of the cost will have been borne by American rather than European taxpayers.

This is also probably why the US is telling the Europeans to pay up for the defence spendings.

You can't expect the US taxpayers to pay for European defence whilst the Europeans try to assert their independence.
 

Mastankhan

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However, as Pakistan has seen lately, you can find yourself in a dangerous situation without sufficient time to 'develop military capabilites'.
Hi,

For pakistan---it was intentional and part of bad planning that it did not prepare itself in a timely manner for that "eventual conflict".

When pakistan did not have the equipment or it was sanctioned---pakistan's military was crying about sanctions---but when sanctions came off---the military did not show any urgency in filling up that hole which was created by the long period of sanctions---.

The questioned to be asked would be---was the lack of urgency shown a part of DISARMING pakistan or keeping it weak by a certain military group---.

If one digs in deeper---there is smell of complacency and treason in the high ranks of the Fly Boys---. The thing is---that they just had one job---ie to make the defense strong---and when you get paid good for the job---get all the fringe benefits for the job---have a good living expense and a great retirement plan and yet you fail to deliver in a timely manner for close to 3 decades---people have a right to question---.
 

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Dassault, Airbus Want European Combat Air Program Accelerated
October 8, 2019

fcas_agre_1570521824 - Copy.jpg

European Future Combat Air System (FCAS) agreement signing

Dassault and Airbus who are jointly developing the European Future Combat Air System (FCAS), have sought that participating European governments move forward by launching the programme’s demonstrator phase.

Two years ago, French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel agreed to jointly develop the European Future Combat Air System (FCAS). “This initiative, of major importance for European Defence, now should quickly move forward by launching the programme’s demonstrator phase,” a Dassault statement said Monday.

What is important now is to achieve concrete progress on FCAS. The upcoming Franco-German ministerial council meeting should serve as a catalyst for this joint desire to move forward by rapidly launching this demonstrator phase and committing the partner nations to a reliable funding plan.
“If Europe does not move forward — and move forward quickly — on this programme, it will be impossible to maintain the development and production capabilities needed for a sovereign defence industry,” the statement said.

1570572511400.png

FCAS concept

The goal is for FCAS to enter operational service in 2040 at the latest. This deadline might seem a long way in the future, but planning needs to start well in advance.

It is true that the first major steps have already been taken successfully. A Franco-German industrial organisation has been defined under the respective national leadership of DASSAULT AVIATION and AIRBUS.

A Franco-German Joint Concept Study (JCS) was launched in January 2019 to define the main features of the system. Airbus and Dassault Aviation wish to underline how quickly both companies had jointly concluded agreements and prepared themselves to move forward. Spain has officially joined the programme as the third partner nation.

However, future technologies need to be developed now for subsequent flight testing and qualification. This maturation phase is essential to de-risk and anticipate developments of such complexity. That is why government and industry agreed to launch a demonstrator development phase as early as possible, for which French and German industry, coordinated by DASSAULT AVIATION and AIRBUS, submitted proposals during the Paris Air Show in June 2019.
 

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France and Germany Want a Stealth Fighter That Is Better Than the F-35
October 15, 2019
Is that possible?
by Mark Episkopos

W85 (1) - Copy.jpg


Key point: A sixth-generation fighter will take advantage of technologies that even the F-35 doesn't have.

France and Germany have unveiled their much-anticipated Future Combat System (FCAS) at this year’s Paris Air Show, formally entering the global race for a sixth-generation fighter.

FCAS is the successor to aircraft manufacturer Dassault’s four-decade old, fourth-generation Rafale fighter, boasting a bubble canopy design accompanied by what appears to be a fully digitized onboard display. FCAS is significantly larger than its predecessor, but—as with virtually all other fifth and likely sixth generation stealth fighters—will likely only come in a single seat version. Given France’s dedication to a Carrier Strike Group naval doctrine, carrier-compatible FCAS variants are all but guaranteed.

FCAS adheres closely to the information fusion design philosophy of the F-35: “FCAS is more than a combat aircraft. FCAS is a system of systems consolidating a large array of interconnected and interoperable elements: a new generation fighter aircraft, unmanned MALE drones (medium-altitude, long endurance), the current aircraft fleet (which will still be in service after 2040), cruise missiles and drone swarms. The entire system will be connected and operable with a vast perimeter of mission aircrafts, satellites, NATO systems as well as land and naval combat systems. The new generation fighter aircraft will complete and eventually replace the current Rafale and Eurofighters from 2040 onwards,” according to FCAS co-manufacturer Airbus.

France’s upcoming fighter will thus be able to interface with all other satellites and friendly aircraft in the FCAS “air combat cloud,” providing a dynamic, real-time portrait of the battlefield.

It is also clear from this statement, as well as from the accompanying infographics, that the FCAS can direct these “remote carrier” drones to execute a wide range of offensive, recon, and support tasks. Auxiliary drone integration is a popular emerging theme of sixth and late-fifth generation aircraft technology, reportedly present on the successor to China’s J-20 and even on the Su-57.

The Paris Air Show presentation revealed little by way of conventional specifications, instead focusing on the fighter’s “sixth-generation” software capabilities. There is not much room for guesswork when it comes to weapons loadouts, as its lower fuselage is completely obscured in all publicly available photos. It is, however, safe to assume that the fighter will be compatible with nuclear missiles including France’s ASMP and the US B-61-12.

Also, much like the F-35, the FCAS is a joint development project with multiple program partners including Germany and Spain. The participation of the former explains why, as per Airbus’ aforementioned statement, FCAS will be phasing out the Rafale as well as Germany’s Eurofighter by 2040. More than just a plane or series of systems, FCAS has become a crucial next chapter in the emergence of a common European defense industry.

Britain is conspicuously absent from the FCAS program, opting instead to go it alone with its own sixth-generation Tempest fighter to compete with the FCAS while complementing the existing British F-35 fleet. French President Emmanuel Macron indirectly decried Britain’s decision with an appeal to Europe’s common security interests: “Competition amongst Europeans when it weakens us against the Americans, the Chinese, is ridiculous.”

The first FCAS prototypes are expected to fly by 2026.
 

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If they want to control drones from these planes, I think they are going to need a second seat, which I bet would really put a hurting on on fuel and weapons load
 

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Britain is conspicuously absent from the FCAS program, opting instead to go it alone with its own sixth-generation Tempest fighter to compete with the FCAS while complementing the existing British F-35 fleet. French President Emmanuel Macron indirectly decried Britain’s decision with an appeal to Europe’s common security interests: “Competition amongst Europeans when it weakens us against the Americans, the Chinese, is ridiculous.”
The Brists really are doubling down on Brexit. They are probably going to find it less benefitial to rely on the US at the cost of the EU.
 

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