How long does it take to train a naval ship crew? | World Defense

How long does it take to train a naval ship crew?

vash

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We often see reports of a new class of warship had just entered the service etc. kind of news. It means, either the crew is totally new to naval ship, or at least totally new to this class of naval ship. (Either they had never been on any naval ship, or they were transferred from older class of naval ship which operations are quite different compare to the new one).

I mean come on, even when we start to play a new FPS video game, it will take at least a few weeks to get hang of it for even the most experienced FPS gamers. The systems on a naval ship would be a lot more complex than some assigned keys in a video game, and not to mention the time required to work with another 100+ people on the same ship is what makes things more complex.

The question is, how long does it take to train the newly assigned crew to combat ready status? I am sure the time required is different for different class of ships, but I just need an estimation.
 

xTinx

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I think there's a need to contextualize your question. Which naval culture would you like to hear about? It differs from country to country. If you're curious about the naval crew training timeline in the United States then you can simply visit this site: America's Navy Recruiting : Navy.com.
 

Corzhens

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I have a relative who entered the US navy. He was assigned in an aircraft carrier stationed in Hawaii. From what I gathered, they were trained in another ship before being assigned in that big war vessel. I really have no account of the duration of the training but I'm sure it is less than a year. And for a naval ship poised to position for a war, mostly like the crew would come from another ship so they would have a experience and the training required is just a few weeks.
 

Noreht

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as we all know it takes years of planning and shipbuilding to get a warship seaworthy. What we did before receiving our new frigates was to go to Germany for 18 months and work on a combination of simulators and other ships that were built for their other clients. After the ship was commissioned outfitting of most of the systems still needed to take place so we spent another 24 months outfitting the ships and undergoing sea trials. The process to start working on a new vessel is long and difficult but it is well worth it.
 

explorerx7

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I believe that this type of training would be an ongoing thing. Therefore, they would have been thought the fundamentals for operating the different types of vessels. When a new vessel is commissioned, I believe there would be added training to familiarise the crew with the new features that may come with the vessel.
 

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The way brand new state of the art ships controls are designed are much like what sailors would be used to.
It isn't just like a different joypad layout, each section and unit of the ship has individual controls, these don't vastly change.

A crew member from nothing to sailor here takes around a year, but then they're deployed on a ship that's been in service for at least a few years.

Teamwork, being a component as part of a larger team is they key training
 

Noreht

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The way brand new state of the art ships controls are designed are much like what sailors would be used to.
It isn't just like a different joypad layout, each section and unit of the ship has individual controls, these don't vastly change.
It is actually the exact opposite of this. As someone who had gone through the training I can tell you now that everything is different in the new ships. Even the way your bunk folds into the deck.

It took us a long time to get used to how things work. The electrical guys are probably the most effected, but even our aiming systems are different. It really is not as easy as you are describing.
 

vash

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Yeah, i was just reading some news earlier about an interview of the crew on a new model destroyer. They said it was pretty rough for them, since they were the "first ones". They had to figure things out for themselves how to operate everything efficiently, and it is up to them to write the crew manual for the next ships of the same model. So basically the first crew of the first ship of each model will require a lot longer time to get used to the new "toys" than the next a few ships of the same line.


It is actually the exact opposite of this. As someone who had gone through the training I can tell you now that everything is different in the new ships. Even the way your bunk folds into the deck.

It took us a long time to get used to how things work. The electrical guys are probably the most effected, but even our aiming systems are different. It really is not as easy as you are describing.
 

Mastankhan

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We often see reports of a new class of warship had just entered the service etc. kind of news. It means, either the crew is totally new to naval ship, or at least totally new to this class of naval ship. (Either they had never been on any naval ship, or they were transferred from older class of naval ship which operations are quite different compare to the new one).

I mean come on, even when we start to play a new FPS video game, it will take at least a few weeks to get hang of it for even the most experienced FPS gamers. The systems on a naval ship would be a lot more complex than some assigned keys in a video game, and not to mention the time required to work with another 100+ people on the same ship is what makes things more complex.

The question is, how long does it take to train the newly assigned crew to combat ready status? I am sure the time required is different for different class of ships, but I just need an estimation.
Hi,

Combat ready could be at different levels / tiers for different jobs. 3-5 years
 

Nilgiri

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nice to see you here too
Who are you? I never seen you before or talked to you :p

hehehe....bhai its great to see you, will be interesting to see what we end up chatting when it more quiet and not much tharki threads around :D

Hope you have a happy new year friend.
 

Hellhound

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Who are you? I never seen you before or talked to you :p

hehehe....bhai its great to see you, will be interesting to see what we end up chatting when it more quiet and not much tharki threads around :D

Hope you have a happy new year friend.
may you too have a happy new year brother.and about the discussions we will see where it takes us%/
ps who said there isn't one(tharki thread) here (*_-)
https://world-defense.com/threads/models-thread.4466/
 
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