Indian Navy Submarines | World Defense

Indian Navy Submarines

UAE

SENIOR MEMBER
Joined
Nov 28, 2014
Messages
1,642
Reactions
921 11
Country
USA
Location
United Arab Emirates
New Delhi is considering a project to build six Japanese Soryu-class submarines, Indian reports say.





MOSCOW, January 30 (Sputnik), Ekaterina Blinova — New Delhi is considering a project to build six Japanese Soryu-class diesel-electric submarines in an Indian shipyard, according to Indian media resources.



"In keeping with their expanding strategic partnership, the Modi government has asked the Shinzo Abe administration whether it would be interested in the over Rs 50,000 crore [$8.1 billion] project to build six stealth submarines in India," the Times of India reported.

It should be noted that in 2007, India had launched Project 75I, which was aimed at replacing its aging fleet with new foreign vessels. After repeated delays, the plan eventually obtained its second wind under the new Prime Minister, Narendra Modi. It is expected, that the six diesel-electric submarines will be built in India, in compliance with the popular "Make in India" initiative.

The Modi Cabinet, which plans to put the project out to tender, has reportedly forwarded a proposal to Japan to "consider the possibility" of building its Soryu-class submarines in India on condition that Japan "will form a joint venture with an Indian shipyard," the Diplomat points out.


The National Interest emphasizes that Tokyo is "especially keen on breaking into the global submarine market." The American media outlet stresses that Soryu-class submarines made by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation have a number of competitive advantages, citing Robert Farley, the TNI's (Transnational Institute) contributor:


"At 4,200 tons submerged, the Soryu-class is considerably larger than either the [German] Type 214, [French] Scorpene, or improved [Russian] Kilo, and can carry a much heavier weapons load. This size also makes them quieter and longer-ranged than the other boats on the market. At current price expectations of around $500 million, the Soryus are not wildly more expensive than the other boats."

The National Interest also notes that Australia and Japan have recently been discussing a program aimed at the sale and purchase of 12 diesel-electric Soryu-class vessels.

The Times of India underscores that the United States "has been pushing for greater defense cooperation among India, Japan and Australia" in order to counterbalance China's growing military power in the Asia-Pacific region and especially the South China Sea, which has long been the subject of fierce territorial disputes between Beijing and its neighbors. Experts stress that the United States is interested in preventing close cooperation between Eurasia's BRICS members, particularly China and India, that could diminish the influence of the West in the region.



India Considering Adding Japanese Soryu-Class Submarines to its Fleet / Sputnik International
 

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,117 263
INS Kalvari: All you need to know about navy’s first Scorpene submarine
Kalvari is named after the dreaded Tiger Shark, a deadly deep sea predator of the Indian Ocean.
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
Dec 14, 2017

The first of a six scorpene submarine, Kalvari, was on Thursday handed over to the Indian Navy for its commissioning.

Kalvari is named after the dreaded Tiger Shark, a deadly deep sea predator of the Indian Ocean. The navy is betting on the ‘Make in India’ Scorpene project to sharpen its underwater attack capabilities.

Here’s all you need to know about the submarine:

The project
Kalvari was built indigenously under a venture called Project 75, at Mumbai’s Mazagon Docks. Under this project, the Indian Navy was authorised to build six submarines in collaboration with French firm DCNS at a cost of around Rs 350 crore.

Construction of the first submarine had started on May 23, 2009 and the project ended way behind schedule.

Features and stealth
Kalvari can carry 18 torpedoes and travel 1,020km underwater. The 66-metre submarine can dive up to a depth of 300 metres to elude enemy detection.

It has superior stealth and the ability to launch crippling attacks on the enemy with precision-guided weapons. The attack can be carried out with torpedoes as well as tube-launched anti-ship missiles underwater or from the surface.

This Scorpene submarine is designed to operate in all theatres of war, including the tropics. Kalvari is capable of handling various missions such as anti-surface warfare (attacking surface ships), anti-submarine warfare (destroying submarines), intelligence gathering, mine-laying and area surveillance.

The Kalvari was built with a special kind of high-tensile steel that is capable of withstanding high yield stress. This feature allows it to withstand pressure exerted by water, hydrostatic force, while diving deeper to enhance stealth.

It is also capable of carrying weapons that can be easily reloaded at sea.

‘Reincarnation’ of first Kalvari
In keeping with the India’s’ mythologies and naval tradition, the Kalvari is a ‘reincarnation’ of the first Indian submarine to be commissioned into the Indian Navy on December 8, 1967. The previous Kalvari served for nearly three decades, before being decommissioned in May 1996.

“In true nautical tradition, she will now be reincarnated, by Mazagon Dock, once again a powerful predator of the deep, guarding the vast maritime interests of our nation,” the navy said.

Other Scorpene submarines
The second of the Scorpenes under construction, Khanderi, was launched in January 2017 and it is currently undergoing rigorous phase of sea trials. The third Scorpene, Karanj, is being readied for launch later this year.

The remaining submarines are likely to be delivered to the navy by 2020.

India’s submarine fleet
The Indian fleet consists of Russian Kilo-class and German HDW class 209 submarines. Limited serviceability is also an issue -- not all these boats are battle ready at any given point of time.

India’s sub-sea warfare capability pales in front of China’s. The Communist neighbour operates 53 diesel-electric attack submarines, five nuclear attack submarines and four nuclear ballistic missile submarines.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/ins-kalvari-all-you-need-to-know-about-indian-navy-s-first-scorpene-class-submarine/story-9ZvKNTryZNAQTt4AYHboBO.html

Sep 18 2017
INS Kalvari will reportedly be the stealthiest diesel-electric attack boat in service and will take the number of submarines in the Indian Navy to 14. In view of increasing Chinese activity in the Indian Ocean, the navy needs at least 24 to 26 submarines to effectively monitor the region.

The Indian Navy was supposed to get all six submarines between 2012 and 2015, but delays have pushed induction five years behind schedule. INS Khanderi, the second Scorpene submarine, was launched in Mumbai in January 2017. It is currently undergoing trials and will likely be delivered in March 2018. The remaining four boats will be delivered at nine-month intervals.

The submarines will be commissioned without their primary weapon system, the Black Shark torpedo. Last June, the Defence Ministry had deferred a $200-million deal for the Black Shark heavyweight torpedoes, built by Whitehead Alenia Systemi Subacquei, a subsidiary of Italian arms manufacturer Finmeccanica, due to corruption allegations involving Finmeccanica subsidiary AgustaWestland.

https://swarajyamag.com/insta/election-results-counting-of-votes-begins-in-gujarat-and-himachal-pradesh

Here's all you need to know about India's deadliest Scorpene class submarine - INS Kalvari:
December 14, 2017
  1. INS Kalvari is the most modern non-nuclear submarine in the Navy. 'Kalvari' is a Malayalam word that means deep-sea tiger shark. It reflects its agility, strength and predatory prowess. Prime Minister Narendra Modi has called it an "excellent example of Make-in-India and is also a testimony to growing strategic partnership between India and France."
  2. INS Kalvari, which was put through extensive trials for more than four months, is powered by an extremely silent diesel-electric motor making it very difficult to detect underwater.
  3. The submarine fires torpedoes and Excocet anti-ship missiles.
  4. The Scorpene submarines can undertake different types of missions including anti-surface warfare, anti-submarine warfare, intelligence gathering, mine laying and area surveillance.
  5. According to Indian Navy, the scorpene submarine has the capability to launch attacks with torpedoes and tube-launched anti-ship missiles both while submerged or on surface and is designed to operate in all theatres including the Tropics.
  6. The length of INS Kalvari is 67.5 metres and a height of 12.3 metres and displaces 1,600 tonnes. The heart of the Kalvari's weapons system is SUBTICS or Submarine Tactical Integrated Combat System suite which processes information from the sonars on-board the submarine in detecting targets which can then be engaged with torpedoes or missiles.
  7. INS Kalvari has an attack-and-search periscope equipped with infrared/low light level cameras and laser range finders to spot targets on the surface of the sea.
  8. INS Kalvari is the first conventional submarine to be inducted into the Navy after more than 17 years, even as the navy's submarine arm celebrates it golden jubilee in 2017. The Navy last inducted a conventional diesel-electric submarine, INS Sindhushastra, procured from Russia in July 2000.
  9. The very first Indian Navy submarine also bore the name Kalvari and was commissioned in December 1967. It was decommissioned on May 31, 1996 after nearly three decades of service.
  10. The second of the Scorpenes under construction at Mazagon Dock Shipbuilders Limited, Khanderi, was launched in January 2017, and is undergoing rigorous sea trials. The third Scorpene, Karanj, is being readied for launch shortly. The remaining three submarines are in various stages of outfitting. The project is expected to be completed by 2020.
https://www.ndtv.com/india-news/what-is-ins-kalvari-all-you-need-to-know-1787676
 

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,117 263
India commissions first Scorpene submarine – INS Kalvari
Dec 17, 2017
by Bilal Khan-

On December 14, the Indian Navy commissioned the first of six Naval Group (formerly known as DCNS) Scorpene diesel-electric submarines (SSK) – the INS Kalvari.

The INS Kalvari is the first SSK to join the Indian Navy since 2000.

The INS Kalvari is the lead ship of the Project 75 program, which led to New Delhi’s order for six Scorpene SSKs from French shipbuilder DCNS in 2005. Under P75, the Kalvari-class submarines were to be built in India by Mazagon Dock Shipbuilders Limited (MDL) through technology transfers from Naval Group.

Construction of the INS Kalvari began in May 2009. It was floated in October 2015 and launched for sea trials in May 2016. In March 2017, the INS Kalvari had test-fired the MBDA SM39 Exocet anti-ship missile (AShM) and in May 2017, it test-fired an unidentified heavyweight torpedo.

The second ship, INS Khanderi, was also launched for sea trials in January 2017.


The Kalvari-class is equipped with six 533 mm torpedo tubes for a payload of up to 18 AShM and/or heavyweight torpedoes. In its official press-release, Naval Group states, “The Scorpene is a 2000 tons conventional-propulsion submarine designed and developed … for all types of mission, such as surface vessel warfare, anti-submarine warfare, long-range strikes, special operations or intelligence gathering.”

The Indian Navy intends to induct the remaining five Kalvari-class SSKs by 2020.

Notes & Comments:
India had intended to have the Kalvari-class SSKs equipped with air-independent propulsion (AIP) systems by first equipping the last two Project 75 submarines with fuel-cell AIP modules developed by the Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO). This did not materialize. However, in September 2016 the Indian Navy reportedly (via The Hindu) outlined that the Kalvari-class will be retrofitted with an Indian AIP system as part of a refit program in the future.

Its inclusion will enable the Kalvari-class SSK to operate underwater without snorkeling for an extended period of time, potentially weeks. This would make the Kalvari-class a potent anti-ship warfare (AShW) and anti-submarine warfare (ASW) asset in sea-lane interdiction. For the near-term, India may utilize the Kalvari-class for primarily anti-access and area-denial (A2/AD) in its littoral waters.

Thanks to the acoustic mask provided by shipping and other activity, conventional SSKs can be difficult to detect in littoral waters.

However, the Indian Navy’s long-term aspirations are to build an offensively capable sub-surface fleet. To complement the P75 submarines, New Delhi released a Request-for-Information (RFI) for Project 75I for six new-generation AIP-equipped submarines. This is to be additionally joined by another six submarines under Project 76. Speaking to Hindustan Times, a senior Indian Navy officer laid out a roadmap for a total of “18 new conventional submarines and six nuclear-powered boats.”

MDL and Naval Group are hopeful of securing a follow-on order for three additional Scorpene/Kalvari-class submarines from the Indian Navy. In light of DCNS’ information leak in 2016, it is unclear if New Delhi is willing to expand upon the order, especially with P75I in the pipeline. However, India’s investment in the Scorpene thus far – from maintenance and training infrastructure in the Indian Navy to the industrial link with MDL – enables it to expand the Kalvari-class SSK fleet with relative ease. Factors such as cost, the complexity and timeline of P75I and near-term necessity (and MDL’s ability to meet it) would have to be examined by New Delhi before committing (or declining) a follow-on Scorpene acquisition.

https://quwa.org/2017/12/17/india-commissions-first-scorpene-submarine-ins-kalvari/
 

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,117 263
Indian Navy Kalavari / Scorpene class Submarines

S21 - INS Kalavari -Commissioned 14 December 2017

S22 - INS Khanderi -Undergoing User Trials. Expected Commissioning May 2019

S23 - INS Karanj - Undergoing User Trials. Expected Commissioning last qtr 2019

S24 - INS Vela - Undergoing Manufacturer Trials . Expected Commissioning 2020

S25 -INS Vagir - Under construction. Expected Commissioning March 2020

S26 - INS Vagsheer - Under construction. Expected Commissioning November 2020
 
Last edited:

Scorpion

THINK TANK
Joined
Nov 27, 2014
Messages
3,542
Reactions
2,669 31
Country
Saudi Arabia
Location
Saudi Arabia
Is not the Scorpene France-Spain JV class submarine?
 

Scorpion

THINK TANK
Joined
Nov 27, 2014
Messages
3,542
Reactions
2,669 31
Country
Saudi Arabia
Location
Saudi Arabia

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,117 263

A123

MEMBER
Joined
Dec 18, 2017
Messages
214
Reactions
157 2
Country
Malaysia
Location
India
http://www.dnaindia.com/analysis/column-india-s-track-record-on-submarine-induction-is-below-median-2569297

1513859356654.png



The commissioning of INS Kalavari, a Scorpene-class diesel submarine, built in Mumbai with French collaboration on Thursday last (Dec 14) is a significant development by way of inducting a sorely needed new platform to the depleted Indian naval submarine arm. The event was marked by a reiteration of strong political commitment to India’s maritime/naval growth by Prime Minister Modi.

The new Kalvari is the second boat that will carry forward the illustrious tradition of the first diesel submarine acquired by the Indian Navy in December 1967 from the former USSR and the trajectory of the last 50 years has been commendable. In the last five decades, India has achieved a remarkable success – it is the first country globally to leap-frog from a diesel class of submarines to a nuclear-propelled, ballistic missile capable boat – the SSBN. The INS Arihant that has been indigenously designed and built at Visakhapatnam, with valuable support from Moscow is an unprecedented technology transition initiative – for most navies move from diesel boats to SSN (nuclear-propelled attack submarines) and then to SSBN.

This can take decades and the anomalous Indian trajectory is that with almost nil indigenous submarine building capability, it embarked upon an ambitious SSBN program and acquired the necessary proficiency level of designing and fitting a nuclear reactor into a very confined space. The fact that the INS Arihant has been commissioned after satisfactory trials testifies to the composite Indian design and manufacturing capability in the underwater platform domain.

Currently, India has 14 conventional boats and two nukes (one SSBN – the Arihant and one SSN – the Chakra on lease from Russia) that is 16 boats in all. The Indian navy has ambitious plans for enhancing its submarine strength and this includes five more of the Kalvari class; six more follow-on diesel boats; three SSBN to follow the INS Arihant, and six SSN (nuclear-propelled submarines) used in an attack role. In summary, if all programs are taken to their optimum levels of delivery (meaning funding support and design cum manufacturing nimbleness) – India would be able to induct 20 new boats over the next two decades.

How does this compare with China? The first broad indicator is that given the GDP disparity – Beijing allocates almost three times as much as Delhi does for defence outlay – under $ 50 billion for India and over $ 150 bn for China. Within this budget, the naval share for India is modest – a mere 16 percent, while for China it is almost 32 percent. Consequently, the PLA Navy currently has over 70 boats in service and these are a mix of SSBN, SSN and conventional diesel submarines. Concurrently China has an impressive indigenous ship and submarine building program, meaning that the national eco-system for design and manufacturing of ships per se – both merchant and military is of a very high order. India is yet to acquire that level and this is the principal challenge for the Modi government. India does not seek equivalence by way of submarines with China, for such an objective is not desirable. What is critical is the national determination to acquire a navy that has the appropriate index of sufficiency, by way of platform mix and the highest levels of material cum technical support and a human resource pool with the highest level of professionalism. Submariners instinctively internalize the zero-error syndrome when they dive in their ‘iron-coffin.’ The SSBN is the ultimate nuclear deterrent, for any nation that has acquired such capability (P 5 nations plus India) and this is a national capability and not just that of the navy. Hence the funding support has to be appropriately apportioned and the building program of the SSBN, the SSN and the diesel boats will have to be pursued concurrently.

However, India’s track-record in planning submarine induction has been below the median and is a poor reflection on the higher defence management acumen of the nation – that is the PM led Cabinet Committee on Security. The last conventional boat was inducted in July 2000 and despite all the proposals made by the navy – it took 17 years for the second Kalvari to be commissioned.

To her credit, Defence Minister Sitharaman drew attention to this aspect in Mumbai when she noted that the “start-stop” pattern of submarine building would have to be redressed. The Navy’s last built-in-India submarine was inducted in 1994 and a hasty political decision related to financial transgression (the HDW corruption scam) resulted in a very costly program being peremptorily shut down.

In relation to China, it is very likely that in the post-Doklam scenario, over the next decade the maritime/naval domain will be an arena of considerable competition – one that will have to be managed in such a manner that any kind of military confrontation is avoided. In this matrix, the underwater platform, the submarine and related detection sensors will have a central role in shaping an environment of suasion that can be invoked, to render more credible, the Indian posture in the uneasy bi-lateral relationship.

Naval capability is a tangible determinant and has to be carefully nurtured and India has a satisfactory profile despite the modest funding.
 

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,117 263
Scorpene class submarine Vela launched: Key points
TIMESOFINDIA.COM | Updated: May 6, 2019,


Highlights
  • Scorpene class submarine Vela, equipped with modern machinery and technology to guard the seas, was launched in Mumbai on Monday, an official said. It will undergo a number of tests by the Indian Navy before it gets commissioned in the defence fleet, the official added. Here is all you need to know about the new addition to the Indian Navy's arsenal -

* The INS Vela is the fourth of the six submarines of Scorpene class that has completed its out fittings at the Mazagon Dock.
* The submarine has been named 'Vela' after an earlier submarine, which was the lead submarine, of the erstwhile Vela class, the second batch of the Foxtrot class submarines acquired from USSR.
* The fifth Scorpene class submarine will also be launched soon. MDL recently reported an annual turnover of Rs 4,500 crore.
* The out fittings were completed under a 2005 contract signed with France's DCNS — now rebranded as the Naval Group — as part of
Indian Navy's Project-75.

* The first submarine was scheduled to be delivered by 2012, but the project witnessed repeated delays.

* Of the six submarines, INS Kalvari was commissioned in December last year while INS Khanderi and INS Karanj are in advanced stages to join the Navy fleet
* The remaining two — INS Vagir and INS Vagsheer are in the "advanced stages of manufacturing" at the Mazagon Dock.

* The development assumes significance as Chinese ships increase their presence in the Indian Ocean. It said China's submarine force will grow between 65 and 70 by 2020.

* There is also the larger threat on water, including guided-missile cruisers, guided-missile destroyers, and guided-missile frigates, aircraft carriers, amphibious warships and more.

* On Sunday, Britain's Daily Mirror reported that talks are underway for India to buy detailed plans for the 65,000-tonne HMS Queen Elizabeth aircraft carrier and build an indigenous version based on it called INS Vishal in 2022.

 

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,117 263
How to Sink a $3 Billion Dollar Submarine: Forgetting to Close a Hatch
May 05, 2019
Simple mistakes can lead to really big trouble.
by Task and Purpose

“Arihant is the most important platform within India’s nuclear triad covering land-air-sea modes,” the Hindu reports. Well, it’s important if it works — and it probably helps to make your submarine watertight.

The modern submarine is not a simple machine. A loss of propulsion, unexpected flooding, or trouble with reactors or weapons can doom a sub crew to a watery grave.

Also, it’s a good idea to, like, close the hatches before you dive.

Call it a lesson learned for the Indian navy, which managed to put the country’s first nuclear-missile submarine, the $2.9 billion INS Arihant, out of commission in the most boneheaded way possible.The Hindu reported yesterday that the Arihant has been out of commission since suffering “major damage” some 10 months ago, due to what a navy source characterized as a “human error” — to wit: allowing water to flood to sub’s propulsion compartment after failing to secure one of the vessel’s external hatches.

Water “rushed in as a hatch on the rear side was left open by mistake while [the Arihant] was at harbor” in February 2017, shortly after the submarine’s launch, The Hindu reports. Since then, the sub “has been undergoing repairs and clean up,” according to the paper: “Besides other repair work, many pipes had to be cut open and replaced.”

It’s hard to articulate how major a foul-up this is, but Kyle Mizokami does a good job at Popular Mechanics: Indian authorities ordered the pipe replacement because they “likely felt that pipes exposed to corrosive seawater couldn't be trusted again, particularly pipes that carry pressurized water coolant to and from the ship’s 83 megawatt nuclear reactor.” For context, a submarine assigned to Britain’s Royal Navy narrowly avoided a complete reactor meltdown in 2012 after the power sources for its coolant system failed.

The incident is also quite an embarrassment — and strategic concern — for the Indian Armed Forces. A Russian Akula-class attack sub modified to accommodate a variety of ballistic missiles, the Arihant represented a major advance in India’s nuclear triad after its completion in October 2016. (India in 1974 became the 6th country to conduct a successful nuclear test.) Indeed, the Arihant’s ability to deliver K-15 short-range and K-4 intermediate-range nuclear missiles was envisioned as a powerful deterrent against India’s uneasy nuclear state neighbor, Pakistan.

“Arihant is the most important platform within India’s nuclear triad covering land-air-sea modes,” the Hindu reports. Well, it’s important if it works — and it probably helps to make your submarine watertight.

This is just some sloppy, dangerous seamanship, and the Indian Navy better get its act together fast. Either that, or perhaps follow the Royal Navy’s lead and install the 2001-era Windows XP as an operating system on all your most vital vessels. That way, you can blame the blue screen of death instead of “human error” for the next critical foul-up. Although even outdated software probably knows enough to dog down on all the hatches.

 

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,117 263
India Kicks Off $6.5 Bn Submarine Project With Help From Abroad
21 June 2019

View attachment 8353
All six submarines under the $6.5 billion project will be built with assistance from abroad. The Indian Navy has retained the option to “manufacture six more submarines under the project.”

New Delhi (Sputnik): The Indian government has issued an expression of interest to foreign companies to construct six advanced diesel-electric submarines for its navy.
The defence ministry has said Project 75-I is valued at around $6.5 billion. As part of the project, leading submarine manufacturers across the continents will need to work with an Indian partner to supply the submarines.

The defence ministry says the project ''will provide a major boost to the indigenous design and construction capability of submarines in India, in addition to bringing in the latest submarine design and technologies as part of the project''.

All six submarines under this project will be built in India by the selected Indian Strategic Partner in collaboration with the selected foreign submarine manufacturer.
The Indian Navy also retained the option to “manufacture six more submarines under the project”.

Companies interested in the project are expected to respond to the announcement within two months. The lowest bidder will be selected as the winner of the mega project.

The Indian Navy has stipulated, in its draft request of information, indigenous content of 45%, additionally mandating that the submarines should be fitted with Indian steel, missiles, torpedoes including the indigenously developed heavy weight torpedo and air independent propulsion. The navy also wants all copyrights for the submarine to be vested to India once the initial batch of 6 submarines has been constructed so India can export the vessel.

Currently, the Indian Navy has a single production line in Mumbai wherein French designed Scorpene Class submarine has been manufacturing with a five year delay.

The Indian Navy presently operates 14 conventionally-powered submarines, two nuclear ballistic missile submarines, and a Russian-built nuclear powered fast attack submarine.

As per the 30-year plan, unveiled soon after the 1999 Kargil war, the Indian Navy had set a target to achieve at least 24 submarines by 2030 to maintain its superiority in the Indian Ocean.

 

Top