Iranian Affairs

Combat Medic

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There is a huge possibility that in the the upcoming Arab summit Ahwaz will be recognize as either legitimate opposition or a state. Can not wait for that to happen.
I highly doubt that but Iran will be pushed out of the game sooner than later.
 

Eagle1

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Trump Waives Iran Nuclear Sanctions for Last Time
Last Updated: January 13, 2018
VOA News

United States President Donald Trump approved new sanctions on Iran Friday, while stopping short for a third time of re-imposing harsh sanctions intended to push Tehran to give up nuclear weapons research.

Trump said he was waiving the nuclear sanctions for the last time in order to give Congress and European allies 120 days to improve the agreement or face U.S. abandonment of the pact.

The president's proposals to "fix the deal's disastrous flaws" include Iran's agreement to open all sites immediately to international inspectors and an assurance from Tehran that it never develop a nuclear weapon.

According to the White House, any new Iran deal would have to cover Iran's ballistic missiles and limit its nuclear breakout period indefinitely.

"In the absence of such an agreement, the United States will not again waive sanctions in order to stay in the Iran nuclear deal. And if at any time I judge that such an agreement is not within reach, I will withdraw from the deal immediately," Trump said in a statement.

Additionally, the Treasury Department imposed new measures that target Iranian businesses and individuals for human rights abuses. They were imposed on 14 Iranian entities and individuals, the most prominent of whom is the head of the country's judiciary, Sadegh Amoli Larijani. The department has linked Larijani to "the commission of serious human rights abuses" against Iranian people.

Among the other blacklisted entities are the cyber unit of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, which the Trump administration maintains has stifled social media networks that demonstrators can use to communicate.

The administration official said the sanctions are part of a broader effort to counter Iran's "reckless" and "destabilizing behavior," including actions related to the crackdown on protesters, at least 21 of whom have been killed this month.

"The United States will not stand by while the Iranian regime continues to engage in human rights abuses and injustice," Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said in a statement. "We are targeting the head of Iranian regime, including the head of Iran's judiciary for the appalling treatment of its citizens, including those imprisoned only for exercising their right to freedom of peaceful assembly and for censoring its own people as they stand up in protest of their government."

By law, the administration must certify to Congress every 90 days whether Iran is complying with a 2015 agreement it signed with the international community to limit its nuclear program.

In October, Trump refused to certify the agreement, saying Tehran had failed to live up to the spirit of the 2015 deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, but held off on re-imposing severe sanctions on Iran's central bank and energy industry that had existed previously. Trump is expected to reaffirm the agreement next week.

Trump did not restore the sanctions on the banking and energy sectors, which were rescinded with the intent of inducing Iran to curb its nuclear program.

The decision to extend sanctions relief to Iran came after the president met with his national security team on the Iran question late Thursday.

The decision is likely to disappoint exile groups and human rights activists who had hoped for tougher measures from an administration that has voiced strong support for anti-government protests in many Iranian cities and a president who has harshly criticized the Iran nuclear agreement.

"Those are completely unrealistic and non-starter demands, and Donald Trump knows this very well," Trita Parsi, President of National Iranian American Council, told VOA. "There is no circumstance Iranians would accept putting permanent restrictions on their program that no other country has on its programs."

Mnuchin, in answer to a VOA question at Thursday's White House press briefing, suggested that Trump's actions would capture the attention of Tehran.

"The president has been very clear that many aspects of the Iran deal need to be changed," he said. "There are many activities outside of the Iran deal, whether it be ballistic missiles, whether it be other issues, that we will continue to sanction, that are outside the JCPOA."

A senior fellow for Middle East Studies at the New York-based Council on Foreign Relations, Ray Takeyh, said Trump is attempting a difficult balancing act between supporting allies who want to preserve the accord and intelligence estimates of Iran's destabilizing role in the Middle East.

"Iran's domestic repression, regional aggression and proliferation are a problem, and the challenge is trying to balance these concerns with a punitive policy," he said in a telephone interview.

Takeyh, who was formerly a State Department adviser on Iran, said the quandary facing Trump is that in the absence of European support, his ability to sanction the Tehran government is limited.

"How do you unravel an arms control agreement that has the support of a number of parties that were members to it, even though that arms deal is profoundly defective?" he asked.

On Thursday, European parties to the deal made clear they firmly support the JCPOA, leaving Trump diplomatically isolated. After a meeting in Brussels, European Union foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini said while there are concerns about Iran's development of ballistic missiles and other activities in the Middle East, those should be dealt with as a separate issue.

Iran has maintained its nuclear program is solely peaceful in nature. Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif attended the EU meeting, but did not appear alongside the other diplomats as they spoke to reporters. On Wednesday, however, Zarif accused the United States of implementing destructive policies.

The JCPOA was put in place through a United Nations Security Council resolution with monitoring by the International Atomic Energy Agency, which has certified that Iran is complying with its responsibilities that include limiting its enrichment of uranium and dismantling equipment.

https://www.voanews.com/a/trump-iran-sanctions/4205318.html
 

Eagle1

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Iran’s Rouhani: Trump ‘Failed to Undermine Nuclear Deal’
January 14, 2018
Reuters

CC3D421A-97C8-4019-B188-FF8012BD3B7F_cx3_cy4_cw92_w1023_r1_s.jpg

FILE - photo, released by official website of the office of the Iranian Presidency, President Hassan Rouhani speaks in a cabinet meeting in Tehran, Iran.

ANKARA, TURKEY —
Iran’s president said Sunday the United States had failed to undermine a nuclear deal between Tehran and major powers, and hailed the accord as a “long-lasting victory” for Iran, state television reported.

U.S. President Donald Trump on Friday delivered an ultimatum to European signatories of the deal to fix the “terrible flaws” of the agreement with Iran, or the United States would pull out.

“The American administration has failed to undermine the nuclear deal ... Trump, despite his repeated efforts, has failed to undermine the accord ... The deal is a long-lasting victory for Iran,” President Hassan Rouhani said in a speech, broadcast live on state TV.

On Friday, Trump agreed to waive sanctions against Iran for the last time to give the United States and European allies a final chance to amend the pact.

Iran says the nuclear deal is not renegotiable and it will stick to the accord as long as the other signatories respect it but will “shred” the deal if Washington pulls out.

Under the deal, Iran agreed to curb its nuclear program, in exchange for the lifting of most sanctions.

https://www.voanews.com/a/iran-rouhani-nuclear-deal-trump-failed/4207020.html
 

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US Treasury Sanctions Individuals and Entities for Human Rights Abuses and Censorship in Iran, and Support to Sanctioned Weapons Proliferators
U.S. Department of the Treasury

January 12, 2018


Iranian Regime Prioritizes Destabilizing Weapons While Silencing Its Citizens

Washington – Today, the Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) designated 14 individuals and entities in connection with serious human rights abuses and censorship in Iran, and support to designated Iranian weapons proliferators.

"The United States will not stand by while the Iranian regime continues to engage in human rights abuses and injustice. We are targeting the Iranian regime, including the head of Iran's judiciary, for its appalling mistreatment of its citizens, including those imprisoned solely for exercising their right to freedom of peaceful assembly, and for censoring its own people as they stand up in protest against their government," said Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin. "We are also targeting Iran's ballistic missile program and destabilizing activities, which it continues to prioritize over the economic well-being of the Iranian people."

Today's actions were taken pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) 13553, which targets serious human rights abuses by the Government of Iran; E.O. 13606, which targets grave human rights abuses by the Governments of Iran and Syria via information technology; E.O. 13628, which targets, among other things, censorship or other activities that prohibit, limit, or penalize the exercise of freedom of expression or assembly by citizens of Iran, or that limit access to print or broadcast media; and E.O. 13382, which targets proliferators of weapons of mass destruction and their supporters.



Sadegh Amoli Larijani

Today, OFAC designated Sadegh Amoli Larijani pursuant to E.O. 13553 for being an official of the Government of Iran who is responsible for or complicit in, or responsible for ordering, controlling, or otherwise directing, the commission of serious human rights abuses against persons in Iran or Iranian citizens or residents. As head of Iran's Judiciary, Sadegh Amoli Larijani has administrative oversight over the carrying out of sentences in contravention of Iran's international obligations, including the execution of individuals who were juveniles at the time of their crime and the torture or cruel, inhumane, and degrading treatment or punishment of prisoners in Iran, including amputations.

Rajaee Shahr Prison and Gholamreza Ziaei

OFAC designated Rajaee Shahr Prison and Iranian national Gholamreza Ziaei in connection with serious human rights abuses in Iran. Rajaee Shahr Prison was designated pursuant to E.O. 13553 for being a person acting on behalf of the Government of Iran who is responsible for or complicit in, or responsible for ordering, controlling, or otherwise directing, the commission of serious human rights abuses against persons in Iran or Iranian citizens or residents. Gholamreza Ziaei was designated pursuant to E.O. 13553 for having acted for or on behalf of Rajaee Shahr Prison.

Rajaee Shahr Prison has denied prisoners adequate medical care and access to legal representation. Many Iranians who recently protested against their government are imprisoned at Rajaee Shahr, a facility where prisoners participating in hunger strikes are denied medical care; where there are reported incidents of sexual abuse and unlawful executions; and where at least one prisoner had his eye gouged out by prison officials. Gholamreza Ziaei has served as the director of Rajaee Shahr Prison since October 2017.

Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps Electronic Warfare and Cyber Defense Organization

The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps Electronic Warfare and Cyber Defense Organization (IRGC EWCD Organization) was designated pursuant to E.O. 13606 for being owned or controlled by, or acting for or on behalf of, Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), which was listed in the Annex to E.O. 13606.

The IRGC has been designated under multiple sanctions authorities, including E.O. 13553 in connection with Iran's human rights abuses. Most recently, on October 13, 2017, the IRGC was designated pursuant to the global terrorism authority E.O. 13224 for activities in support of the IRGC-Qods Force. The IRGC EWCD Organization, which organizes and conducts training courses on behalf of the IRGC, has attempted to censor Iranians' access to Western media.

The Supreme Council of Cyberspace and The National Cyberspace Center

OFAC designated Iran's Supreme Council for Cyberspace pursuant to E.O. 13628 for engaging in censorship or other activities with respect to Iran that prohibit, limit, or penalize the exercise of freedom of expression or assembly by citizens of Iran, or that limit access to print or broadcast media.

The Supreme Council of Cyberspace was created in 2012 by Iran's Supreme Leader to centralize and oversee the Iranian regime's Internet policymaking and regulation. Since its creation, and for the purported purpose of "protecting the country from negative content of cyberspace," the Supreme Council of Cyberspace has continued the Iranian regime's blocking of many social media sites and other Internet censorship efforts. As the country's top Internet policymaking body, the Supreme Council of Cyberspace oversees the Iranian regime's disruption of the free flow of information by restricting access to tens of thousands of websites, particularly those of international news sources, anti-regime outlets, ethnic and religious minorities, human rights groups, and popular social media sites.

OFAC designated Iran's National Cyberspace Center, for being owned or controlled by the Supreme Council of Cyberspace. The National Cyberspace Center has prevented Iranians from accessing Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) and internet proxies, which are used to bypass Iran's Internet controls, and has sought to prevent Iranians from accessing Western media content. In September 2015, the director of the National Cyberspace Center stated that a building in Tehran's Saadat Abad neighborhood, which is an affluent area of Iran's capital, has been purchased to house the National Cyberspace Center and the office of the head of the Supreme Council of Cyberspace.

Green Wave Telecommunication and Morteza Razavi

OFAC designated Malaysia-based Green Wave Telecommunication and Iranian Morteza Razavi for their activity on behalf of a designated Iranian entity. Green Wave Telecommunication was designated pursuant to E.O. 13382 for being owned or controlled by, and for providing support to, Fanamoj. Morteza Razavi was designated pursuant to E.O. 13382 for acting for or on behalf of Green Wave Telecommunication and Fanamoj.

Fanamoj was designated pursuant to E.O. 13382 on October 13, 2017 for providing support to the IRGC and Iran's Naval Defence Missile Industry Group (SAIG).

Green Wave Telecommunication acquires export-controlled technology and devices on behalf of Fanamoj and its subsidiary, Rastafann. Under the leadership and direction of Morteza Razavi, Green Wave Telecommunication acquired controlled U.S.-origin technology and re-shipped it to Iran-based companies. Morteza Razavi serves as Green Wave Telecommunication's Director and as Fanamoj's Commercial Director.

Iran Helicopter Support and Renewal Company and Iran Aircraft Industries

OFAC designated Iran Helicopter Support and Renewal Company (PANHA) and Iran Aircraft Industries (SAHA), two Iranian defense industry firms that provide key maintenance and overhaul services for Iran's military helicopters and aircraft. PANHA and SAHA were designated pursuant to E.O. 13382 for being owned or controlled by Iran's Aviation Industries Organization.

Iran's Aviation Industries Organization, which is responsible for managing Iran's military aviation industry, was designated pursuant to E.O. 13382 on December 12, 2013 as part of a network of proliferators headed by Iran's Ministry of Defense and Armed Forces Logistics.

PANHA is a leading Iranian helicopter maintenance and manufacturer, and has built and overhauled helicopters, including models manufactured in the United States, for the Iranian military and the IRGC. SAHA is Iran's largest provider of overhaul and technical modification services for Iran's military and cargo aircraft.

Shi Yuhua

OFAC designated Chinese-national Shi Yuhua pursuant to E.O. 13382 for acting for or on behalf of, directly or indirectly, Wuhan Sanjiang Import and Export Co. LTD (Wuhan Sanjiang), and for having provided financial, material, technological, or other support for, or goods or services in support of, Iran's Shiraz Electronics Industries (SEI). Shi Yuhua, an employee at Wuhan Sanjiang, is responsible for selling navigation-related equipment to SEI.

Wuhan Sanjiang was designated pursuant to E.O. 13382 on October 13, 2017 for having provided financial, material, technological, or other support for, or goods or services in support of, SEI.

SEI was designated pursuant to E.O. 13382 on September 19, 2008 for being owned or controlled by Iran's Ministry of Defense and Armed Forces Logistics. SEI engaged in the production of various electronics equipment for the Iranian military, including radars, microwave electron vacuum tubes, naval electronics, avionics and control systems, training simulators, missile guidance technology, and electronic test equipment.

Since at least 2014, on behalf of Wuhan Sanjiang, Shi Yuhua sold SEI navigation-related gyrocompasses valued at hundreds of thousands of dollars, and a variety of highly specialized sensors valued at nearly one million dollars, while obfuscating transactions to avoid detection. Following Wuhan Sanjiang's designation, Shi Yuhua continued business with SEI on behalf of Wuhan Sanjiang.

Iran- and China-Based Procurement Network

OFAC designated Pardazan System Namad Arman (PASNA) pursuant to E.O. 13382 for having provided, or attempted to provide, financial, material, technological, or other support for, or goods or services in support of, Iran's Electronic Components Industries (ECI).

ECI was designated pursuant to E.O. 13382 on July 12, 2012 for being owned or controlled by Iran Electronics Industries (IEI), which was designated pursuant to E.O. 13382 in 2008 for being owned or controlled by Iran's Ministry of Defense for Armed Forces Logistics (MODAFL). ECI conducts work on a variety of military and civilian projects.

Iran-based PASNA has sought to procure various types of lead zirconium tritanate (PZT) items valued at hundreds of thousands of dollars from China-based Bochuang Ceramic, Inc. on behalf of Iran's ECI. PZT items can transmit and receive electrical signals, and are used for anti-submarine warfare, torpedoes, mines, mine countermeasures, aircraft, and ocean surveillance purposes.

Bochuang Ceramic, Inc. is being designated pursuant to E.O. 13382 for having provided, or attempted to provide, financial, material, technological, or other support for, or goods or services in support of, PASNA. China-based Bochuang sought to sell PASNA hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of PZT material, obfuscating Iran's ECI as the end user of that material by sending shipments to PASNA.

Zhu Yuequn is being designated pursuant to E.O. 13382 for acting or purporting to act for or on behalf of, directly or indirectly, Bochuang. Chinese national and Bochuang representative Zhu Yuequn has facilitated the sale of PZT items between Bochuang and PASNA, ultimately destined for Iran's ECI.

As a result of this action, all property and interests in property of those designated today subject to U.S. jurisdiction are blocked, and U.S. persons are generally prohibited from engaging in transactions with them. In addition, foreign financial institutions that knowingly facilitate significant transactions for, or persons that provide material or certain other support to, the entities designated today risk exposure to sanctions that could sever their access to the U.S. financial system or block their property and interests in property under U.S. jurisdiction.

https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm0250
 

Eagle1

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The Iran nuclear deal now hangs by a thin thread
byCamelia Entekhabifard
13 January 2018

The US President Donald Trump has waived sanctions on Iran for “one last time,” and set a 120-day deadline to fix what he described as “serious flaws” in the nuclear deal signed in 2015. That ultimatum is addressed not only to Iran, but mainly to the European countries that support the agreement.

Before Trump’s announcement late on Friday, those European allies placed enormous pressure on the president to remain committed to the agreement. So far, these diplomatic efforts, along with advice from Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, have allowed the deal to survive.

However, Trump’s conditions for again waiving sanctions in 120 days’ time are the imposition of new restrictions on Iran’s ballistic missile program, which is not covered by the nuclear deal, and — more significantly — an agreement with European countries that the current 10-year limitation on Iran’s nuclear program become permanent. “If at any time I judge that such an agreement is not within reach, I will withdraw from the deal immediately,” the president said on Friday.

Thus, while Trump has not actually killed the Iran nuclear deal, he has weakened it to the extent that it now dangles on a very thin rope that could break even before the 120-day deadline expires.

During his presidential election campaign, and in the year since he took office, Trump repeatedly castigated the nuclear agreement as “a very bad deal,” and threatened to scrap it. He was persuaded not to because of America’s obligations under international law, and to its European allies.

Last October, however, the president refused to certify that Iran was in compliance with the agreement, and he did so again last Friday. He also imposed new sanctions on 14 Iranian individuals and entities that have committed human rights abuses or supported the country’s ballistic missile program. The most prominent target is the head of Iran’s judiciary, Ayatollah Sadeq Larijani.
With his new ultimatum, Donald Trump may succeed in dismantling the agreement without the need to rip it up.
Camelia Entekhabifard​

Supporters of the nuclear deal hoped it would change Iran’s behavior in the region, and improve its dysfunctional relationship with its neighbors. More than two years on, however, nothing much has changed in Iran’s conduct, and nor have Iranian people enjoyed any significant improvement in their economic and living conditions.

In addition, uncertainty about the Iran deal, and concern over the regime’s role in Syria and Yemen and its support for terrorism, have made investors and international banks hesitant to conduct business with Iran. The poor state of the economy was the main reason for public dissatisfaction and anger with President Hassan Rouhani and Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, which led to the recent demonstrations. Iranians questioned the regime’s international behavior and the way it spends their money on fighting wars in other countries in the region. They blame their own rulers for their poor living conditions, not the US or anyone else.

The political leaders in Tehran, who invested so much in the nuclear deal and the economic benefits they counted on it bringing, understand very well the consequences the nation will face without it.

The main sanctions on Iran’s oil and gas industry and banking system were lifted, and investors were encouraged to enter this untouched market of 80 million people who so much wanted a Westernized and open society. But all those dreams Iranians had for a better political and economical life, based on the nuclear deal, once again look so far away and so unreal.

The White House has now demanded, within 120 days, an agreement on permanent bans on Iranian nuclear enrichment and missile development. Is it possible, at such short notice and given the response so far from Iran, that these demands can be met? Or is it more likely that, by limiting Tehran’s choices in so short a time frame, Trump’s goal is to dismantle the nuclear agreement without actually ripping it up?

It may be that, given Trump’s conditions, it will not be the US that walks out on the nuclear deal — but Iran itself.

• Camelia Entekhabifard is an Iranian-American journalist, political commentator and author of Camelia: Save Yourself By Telling the Truth (Seven Stories Press, 2008).

http://www.arabnews.com/node/1224956
 

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Trump will likely pull out of the deal and announce tough sanctions against Iran. They only way out for Iran is to either test a nuclear capable missile with nuclear warhead or bring its nuclear facilities to a complete stop.
 

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Nuclear deal not negotiable, oil-rich Iran says
From Davos, President Trump and Israel Prime Minister Netanyahu vow to counter 'Iran's malign influence.'

By Daniel J. Graeber
| Updated Jan. 26, 2018



With the United States and Israel vowing to contain Iran, a member of the Iranian parliament says its nuclear agreement with world powers isn't negotiable. Photo courtesy of office of the Israeli prime minister/Twitter

Jan. 26 (UPI) -- The Iranian nuclear agreement, under which easing sanctions pressure allowed its oil to flow, is not negotiable, an Iranian member of parliament said Friday.

U.S. President Donald Trump has vowed repeatedly to dismantle an Iranian nuclear agreement reached with the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council, plus Germany. Implemented while President Barack Obama was in office, the agreement eases sanctions enough to let millions of barrels of Iranian oil flow through the global market.

Meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Davos, the U.S. president vowed to contain what he sees as a malevolent power.

"The two leaders reviewed their ongoing cooperation across a range of issues and stressed their goal of countering Iran's malign influence and threatening behavior in the region," a readout from the White House stated.

Trump on Jan. 12 issued a waiver on oil-related sanctions as part of the nuclear agreement, formally the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action. He hinted it could be the last time, however, if it isn't amended.

Speaking Friday, Valiollah Nanvakenari, a parliamentary member of Iran's National Security and Foreign Policy Commission, said the agreement is not up for review.

"The JCPOA is absolutely not renegotiable," he was quoted by the official Islamic Republic News Agency as saying.

Backers of the nuclear agreement outside the United States voiced their support. British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said following talks earlier this month with Iranian and European diplomats the "deal is a crucial agreement that makes the world safer."

The sanctions on Iranian oil exports in the European market would come at a time when traders are watching a shrinking gap between supply and demand. Taking Iranian oil barrels off the market could lead to higher oil prices.

Trump's stance on major oil producers was questioned in the past, notably last year when he considered tightening sanctions on Venezuela. That move would've created U.S. problems because Venezuela is the largest source of crude oil for southern refiners, ahead of Saudi Arabia.

https://www.upi.com/Nuclear-deal-not-negotiable-oil-rich-Iran-says/5161516965985/?nll=1
 

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Nuclear deal not negotiable, oil-rich Iran says
From Davos, President Trump and Israel Prime Minister Netanyahu vow to counter 'Iran's malign influence.'

By Daniel J. Graeber
| Updated Jan. 26, 2018



With the United States and Israel vowing to contain Iran, a member of the Iranian parliament says its nuclear agreement with world powers isn't negotiable. Photo courtesy of office of the Israeli prime minister/Twitter

Jan. 26 (UPI) -- The Iranian nuclear agreement, under which easing sanctions pressure allowed its oil to flow, is not negotiable, an Iranian member of parliament said Friday.

U.S. President Donald Trump has vowed repeatedly to dismantle an Iranian nuclear agreement reached with the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council, plus Germany. Implemented while President Barack Obama was in office, the agreement eases sanctions enough to let millions of barrels of Iranian oil flow through the global market.

Meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Davos, the U.S. president vowed to contain what he sees as a malevolent power.

"The two leaders reviewed their ongoing cooperation across a range of issues and stressed their goal of countering Iran's malign influence and threatening behavior in the region," a readout from the White House stated.

Trump on Jan. 12 issued a waiver on oil-related sanctions as part of the nuclear agreement, formally the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action. He hinted it could be the last time, however, if it isn't amended.

Speaking Friday, Valiollah Nanvakenari, a parliamentary member of Iran's National Security and Foreign Policy Commission, said the agreement is not up for review.

"The JCPOA is absolutely not renegotiable," he was quoted by the official Islamic Republic News Agency as saying.

Backers of the nuclear agreement outside the United States voiced their support. British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said following talks earlier this month with Iranian and European diplomats the "deal is a crucial agreement that makes the world safer."

The sanctions on Iranian oil exports in the European market would come at a time when traders are watching a shrinking gap between supply and demand. Taking Iranian oil barrels off the market could lead to higher oil prices.

Trump's stance on major oil producers was questioned in the past, notably last year when he considered tightening sanctions on Venezuela. That move would've created U.S. problems because Venezuela is the largest source of crude oil for southern refiners, ahead of Saudi Arabia.

https://www.upi.com/Nuclear-deal-not-negotiable-oil-rich-Iran-says/5161516965985/?nll=1
Iran will eventually get the bomb.
 

Eagle1

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Iran may withdraw from nuclear deal if gets no benefits: Araqchi
Feb 22, 2018
57bef730-4ec5-4622-bcca-c146dce365a6.jpg

Iranian Deputy Foreign Minister Abbas Araqchi speaks at Britain’s Royal Institute of International Affairs in London, February 22, 2017.

Iran says it could withdraw from the 2015 nuclear deal if the "atmosphere of uncertainty" created by the new US administration continues to prevent Tehran from reaping the benefits of the multilateral accord, particularly in the business and banking sectors.

Speaking at Britain's Royal Institute of International Affairs in London, Iranian Deputy Foreign Minister Abbas Araqchi criticized US President Donald Trump over his threat to stop waiving anti-Iran sanctions, a US commitment under known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA).

"If the same policy of confusion and uncertainties about the JCPOA continues, if companies and banks are not working with Iran, we cannot remain in a deal that has no benefit for us," he said. "Trump has created an atmosphere of uncertainty which is like a poison for the business community in working with Iran."

Iran and the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council – the United States, France, Britain, Russia and China – plus Germany signed the nuclear agreement on July 14, 2015 and started implementing it on January 16, 2016.

Under the JCPOA, Iran undertook to put limits on its nuclear program in exchange for the removal of nuclear-related sanctions imposed against Tehran.

Trump has repeatedly described the nuclear deal, as "the worst and most one-sided transaction Washington has ever entered into," a characterization he often used during his presidential campaign, and threatened to tear it up.

The US president on January 12 reluctantly agreed to waive sanctions against Iran that were lifted as part of the landmark deal, but said it would be the last time he issued such a waiver unless his conditions were met.

The US president said he wanted America's European allies to use the 120-day period before sanctions relief again came up for renewal to agree to fix its "terrible flaws," otherwise Washington will no more extend the bans relief.

Araqchi further said, "The deal would not survive this way even if the ultimatum is passed and waivers are extended."

The Iranian official rejected Washington's interpretation of the "sunset" clause in the JCPOA as wrong.

"There is no sunset clause in the JCPOA. Although the US administration and Trump are talking about sunset clause and that JCPOA is just for 10 years, that is not true," he said. "Iran's commitment in the JCPOA not to go for the nuclear weapons is permanent."

Trump's administration has been upset at the deal's "sunset" clause, which it says sets an expiration date for the limits on the Iranian nuclear activities after which Iran will be free to develop a nuclear weapon.

However, under the JCPOA, the monitoring of Iranian nuclear activities by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) will technically not expire. Iran and its negotiating partners agreed under the deal that if the agreement is fully implemented by all sides, Tehran will in eight years ratify the Additional Protocol at its Parliament.
http://www.presstv.com/Detail/2018/02/22/553232/Iran-nuclear-deal-araqchi
 

WebMaster

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Trump announces US withdrawal from Iran nuclear deal, reimposes santions wavied in 2015 and gives EU countries time limit to stop all activities with Iran.
 

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and so it begins....

Israeli minister threatens to 'liquidate' Assad over any Iran attacks from Syria "If Syrian President continues allowing Iran to operate within Syrian territory, Israel will liquidate him and topple his regime," he was quoted as saying.
#BREAKING: Israeli Intelligence Services now expect an imminent barrage of targeted Iranian ballistic missiles at the countries northern military bases fired from #Syria, preparations for an attack reportedly almost complete- Israeli Media

Netanyahu will return directly to Israel from Cyprus today, will cancel his trip to Moscow where he was to meet Putin.
There appears to be significant military activity in Israel, some people seem to think that they’ve begun a buildup ahead of things ”going hot”. For instance a number of MLRS batteries being moved into position in the Golan heights and heavy IAF air activity.
 

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The mullah has signed his death certificate. Trump is not Obama. Now Israel is targeting Iran and Assad bases in Syria and I won't be surprised if Israel launched a direct attack against Iran.

and so it begins....
Israel also called for reserve forces to head to camps.
 

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