Iranian Affairs

Persian Gulf

MEMBER
Joined
May 22, 2019
Messages
123
Reactions
62 1
Country
Iran
Location
United Kingdom
The report did however flag up questions about the number of advanced centrifuges Iran is allowed, which is loosely defined in the deal.

The IAEA said Iran had installed 33 advanced IR-6 centrifuges, machines that can enrich uranium, although only 10 had been tested with uranium feedstock so far. The deal allows Iran to test up to 30, but only after 8 1/2 years have passed. The limit before then is a “grey area”, diplomats say.
This is not mentioned as an issue in the report, but argued to be an inconsistent by the "good ISIS" (pdf of their article on that here: http://isis-online.org/uploads/isis-reports/documents/IAEA_Iran_Report_Analysis_31May2019_Final.pdf).

The "good ISIS" are disliked in the scientific community for having a political bias.

For example the ISIS report says:

"This number of deployed [IR-6] centrifuges [33] is far in excess of what is a reasonable interpretation of the deployment rate implied in Iran’s long-term enrichment plan, which stipulates:

Between years 1 to 8 and a half (of the JCPOA)…[Iran will] continue the testing of the IR6 on single centrifuges and intermediate cascades (testing with uranium of roughly 10 centrifuges and then roughly 20 centrifuges, with each of these groups being tested with uranium for approximately equal time periods.

The IAEA appears unable to state that Iran remains within a reasonable interpretation of the limits of this provision, since it is above even the limit of 30 IR-6 centrifuges that it may operate starting in year 8 or 8.5"
To me, I don't see an inconsistency as only 10 have been tested with uranium, which is exactly what the limit they quote says Iran can do.

The bigger issue is IR-8 centrifuges. Salehi recently said Iran had installed 3 of these (up from 1 - which was accepted to be permitted), but I'm not sure what the relevant limit on that is. IR-8 centrifuges have been tested for over 3 years now, and normally they take 7-10 years to be tested etc and enter mass production. The IR-8 centrifuges are 20x more efficient than the IR-1 centrifuges that Iran currently operates, meaning that in about 5 years time Iran's break-out capability will basically be ensured [Iran is not allowed to install more advanced centrifuges until 2024 under the JCPOA, so that is good timing...).
 

Eagle1

Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
4,405
Reactions
2,359 241 1
Iran Sentences Journalist to 2 Years in Jail
Sunday, 2 June, 2019


Iranian Journalist Masoud Kazemi. File photo

Asharq Al-Awsat

Iran’s judiciary on Sunday sentenced a journalist to two years in jail for “spreading misinformation” and “insulting” the country’s supreme leader and authorities, his lawyer told state media.

Masoud Kazemi was also banned from “media activities” for two years, the lawyer Ali Mojtahedzadeh said, quoted by the official news agency IRNA.

The report did not specify the cause of the charges against Kazemi.

State-run Iran newspaper reported on May 23 that he had been arrested the day before.

The journalist was a reporter for the reformist daily Shargh and also the editor-in-chief of Seda-ye Parsi monthly magazine, the semi-official ISNA news agency reported.

Before the trial, the court set bail at 10 billion rials (about $74,000 at the current open market rate) in the case over charges of "conspiring against national security", the lawyer said.

"Fortunately this charge was dropped during the trial... (and) considering the current charges in the indictment we hope the bail is reduced and he can be freed," Mojtahedzadeh added.

Another journalist, Pouyan Khoshhal, was arrested in October over "insults" against Imam Hussein.

And in August journalist Mir Mohammad Mir-Esmaili was sentenced to 10 years in prison over insulting Imam Reza.

 

Persian Gulf

MEMBER
Joined
May 22, 2019
Messages
123
Reactions
62 1
Country
Iran
Location
United Kingdom
Ex-CIA chief: Iran won’t change owing to ‘culture of resistance’

TEHRAN – Former CIA director John Brennan has criticized the Trump administration’s policies toward Tehran, saying the Iranians will not change their behavior because of their “culture of resistance”.

In an interview with The Irish Times newspaper published on Saturday, Brennan said the threat of war between Washington and Tehran has appeared to increase in recent weeks amid signs of increased U.S. activity in the region.

John Brennan calls Bolton and Pompeo “Iran zealots”.

“The United States has gone down this cul de sac with Iran, by putting pressure on the regime, in the false belief that they will change. It’s a culture of resistance in Iran,” he said, describing U.S. national security adviser John Bolton and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo as “Iran zealots”.

“By reneging on the Iran nuclear deal, by designating the IRGC (Islamic Revolution Guards Corps) as a terrorist organization, by tightening sanctions on Iran and forcing European parties to the agreement to renege on their obligations, the perception in Iran is that the Trump administration ultimately wants to overthrow the regime.”

 

Eagle1

Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
4,405
Reactions
2,359 241 1
German minister upbeat on Iran trade vehicle before Rouhani talks
June 10, 2019
Sabine Siebold

View attachment 7783

TEHRAN (Reuters) - All the formal requirements for a European payment system for barter-based trade with Iran designed to circumvent U.S. sanctions are now in place and it should be operational soon, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said in Tehran on Monday.

Maas is in Iran to meet President Hassan Rouhani and his Iranian counterpart, Mohammad Javad Zarif, as part of a European effort to salvage Iran’s nuclear pact with world powers and defuse rising U.S.-Iranian tension.

“This is an instrument of a new kind, so it’s not straightforward to operationalize it,” Maas told reporters.

“But all the formal requirements are in place now, and so I’m assuming we’ll be ready to use it in the foreseeable future.”

In an effort to protect at least some of Iran’s economy from sweeping U.S. sanctions and keep alive a nuclear deal after Washington quit, France, Britain and Germany have set up a special-purpose vehicle called Instex.


The three European Union members have been trying to get Iran to keep its commitments under the deal to cut back its nuclear program - which Washington distrusts - by helping it to circumvent the trade sanctions Washington has reimposed.

They want Instex to meet norms for legitimate financing set by the Paris-based Financial Action Task Force, even though Iran as a country is not yet fully compliant with them.

On a weekend stopover in Iraq en route to Tehran, Maas warned of the dangers that conflict with Iran posed for the entire Middle East, saying the Europeans were convinced it was worth trying to keep the nuclear pact with Iran.

A spokesman of the Iranian Foreign Ministry criticized the European signatories of its 2015 nuclear deal for failing to salvage the pact after President Donald Trump pulled the United States out of it last year and reimposed sanctions, state television reported.

“So far, we have not seen practical and tangible steps from the Europeans to guarantee Iran’s interests ... Tehran will not discuss any issue beyond the nuclear deal,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said.


Trump condemned the accord, signed by his predecessor Barack Obama, as flawed for not being permanent and for not covering Iran’s ballistic missile program or its role in conflicts around the Middle East.

The European signatories to the deal - France, Britain and Germany - have been trying to save it but share the same concerns as the United States over Iran’s ballistic missile development and regional activities.

“The EU is not in a position to question Iran’s issues beyond the nuclear deal,” Mousavi said.

Writing by Michael Nienaber in Berlin and Parisa Hafezi in Dubai; Editing by Raissa Kasolowsky

 

Eagle1

Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
4,405
Reactions
2,359 241 1
IAEA chief worried about rising tension over Iran nuclear issue
10 June 2019

View attachment 7787
FILE PHOTO: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director General Yukiya Amano addresses a news conference during a board of governors meeting at the IAEA headquarters in Vienna, Austria March 4, 2019. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger

VIENNA (Reuters) - The U.N. atomic watchdog’s chief said on Monday he was worried about rising tensions over Iran’s nuclear program and called for de-escalation through dialogue, departing from his usual guarded language on the country.

Washington has ratcheted up pressure on Tehran over what it sees as its nefarious role in the region. It has tightened already punishing economic sanctions, and deployed an aircraft carrier and other extra hardware to the Middle East in response to what it said was a threat from Iran.

Tehran has responded by threatening to abandon some of the restrictions on its nuclear activities imposed by its landmark 2015 deal with major powers, which also lifted international sanctions against the country.

“I am worried about increasing tensions over the Iranian nuclear issue,” International Atomic Energy Agency chief Yukiya Amano said in a speech to a meeting of the IAEA’s 35-nation Board of Governors, one of its main decision-making bodies.

The United States pulled out of the 2015 deal - the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action - a year ago and reinstated its sanctions. European powers are scrambling to do what little they can to protect Iranian oil sales and other trade.

Amano said he hoped “that ways can be found to reduce current tensions through dialogue. It is essential that Iran fully implements its nuclear-related commitments under the JCPOA.”

Reporting by Francois Murphy; Editing by John Stonestreet and Raissa Kasolowsky

 

Eagle1

Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
4,405
Reactions
2,359 241 1
No Measure against Iran to Go Unanswered: Zarif
June, 10, 2019
TEHRAN (Tasnim) – Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif hit back at the Israeli prime minister over his warmongering remarks against the Islamic Republic, saying any measure against Iran would be followed by “a decisive response”.

View attachment 7804
Speaking to reporters at a joint press conference with his German counterpart, Heiko Maas, in Tehran on Monday, Zarif pointed to claims against Iran’s nuclear program and said, “You should ask a regime possessing nuclear weapons about how (Benjamin) Netanyahu stands next to the Dimona (reactor), a nuclear weapons site, and says Iran should be destroyed.”

Zarif was referring to Netanyahu’s remarks back in August 2018, when he used a visit to Dimona, a secretive Israeli atomic reactor, to warn Tehran that Tel Aviv has the means to destroy the Islamic Republic, in what appeared to be a veiled reference to its assumed nuclear arsenal.
“Of course, no one can act against our people without receiving a decisive response,” the Iranian top diplomat said.

Iran has never waged a war against any country and will not do so in future, Zarif said, adding that if any country starts a war on Iran, however, it would definitely not be the one that ends it.

Zarif further pointed to his earlier meeting with Mass, saying he had “good talks” with the German top diplomat about ways to reduce regional tensions.

Maas arrived in Tehran on Sunday night. His visit is part of a concerted European effort to preserve the 2015 nuclear deal between Tehran and world powers following the US withdrawal from the accord.

He is also scheduled to meet with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani.

Tensions between Washington and Tehran have been rising since US President Donald Trump withdrew the US from the nuclear deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), and imposed unilateral economic sanctions against Iran, mainly targeting its energy dealings on the global market.

On the first anniversary of the US withdrawal from the nuclear deal, Iran announced that it would suspend the implementation of some of its commitments under the deal, announcing that it would stop exporting excess uranium and heavy water, setting a 60-day deadline for the five remaining parties to the deal to take practical measures towards ensuring its interests in the face of the American sanctions.

 

Attachments

Last edited:

Eagle1

Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
4,405
Reactions
2,359 241 1
Iran’s Rouhani Urges Europe to Resist US, Fulfil JCPOA Commitments
  • June, 11, 2019
TEHRAN (Tasnim) – Iranian President Hassan Rouhani called on Europe to resist the United States’ economic terrorism against the Iranian nation and live up to its obligations as per the 2015 nuclear deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA).
View attachment 7807

“We expect Europe to stand up to and resist America’s economic terrorism against the Iranian nation and fulfill its obligations in accordance with the JCPOA,” Rouhani said in a meeting with German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas in Tehran on Monday.

He added that following the US withdrawal from the deal, Iran could have done the same on the strength of Article 36 of the JCPOA, but rather decided to remain patient and give other signatories a chance.

Maas had earlier in the day met with his Iranian counterpart, Mohammad Javad Zarif.

He arrived in Tehran on Sunday night. His visit is part of a concerted European effort to preserve the 2015 nuclear deal between Tehran and world powers following the US withdrawal from the accord.

The US has ratcheted up pressure on Iran since last year after withdrawing from JCPOA.

Since then, the administration of US President Donald Trump is trying to reduce Iran’s oil exports to “zero,” and has sent an aircraft carrier strike group, a bomber squad, an amphibious assault ship, and a Patriot missile battery to the Middle East to try to stack up pressure on Tehran.

Iranian officials, however, have dismissed such moves as psychological warfare, saying the country has its own ways of circumventing the American bans and selling crude oil.

On the first anniversary of the US withdrawal from the nuclear deal, Iran announced that it would suspend the implementation of some of its commitments under the deal, announcing that it would stop exporting excess uranium and heavy water, setting a 60-day deadline for the five remaining parties to the deal to take practical measures towards ensuring its interests in the face of the American sanctions.

 

Eagle1

Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
4,405
Reactions
2,359 241 1
Iran’s Zarif Hails German Recognition of Need for Practical Measures to Save JCPOA
TEHRAN (Tasnim) – Iran’s Foreign Minister described talks with his German counterpart, Heiko Maas, in Tehran on Monday as “frank” and hailed “Germany’s recognition” that in order to save the 2015 nuclear deal, there need to be practical measures to make sure that Iran benefits from the accord.
  • June, 11, 2019
View attachment 7810

“Frank talks with @HeikoMaas. Welcome German recognition that practical measures to ensure Iran’s economic dividends are essential to preserve #JCPOA,” Mohammad Javad Zarif said on his Twitter account later on Monday.

“We concurred that dialog among regional countries is crucial. But @realDonaldTrump's "economic war" is THE cause of all tensions,” he added.
Germany’s Foreign Ministry said on Thursday that addressing ways to save the deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), following the unilateral withdrawal of the US from it in May last year, was the main goal of Maas’ visit to Iran.

In a meeting with Maas on Monday evening, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani called on Europe to resist the United States’ economic terrorism against the Iranian nation
and live up to its obligations as per the nuclear deal.

“We expect Europe to stand up to and resist America’s economic terrorism against the Iranian nation and fulfill its obligations in accordance with the JCPOA” Rouhani told Germany’s top diplomat, adding that following the US withdrawal from the deal, Iran could have done the same on the strength of Article 36 of the JCPOA, but rather decided to remain patient and give other signatories a chance.

Under the JCPOA, Iran undertook to put limits on its nuclear program in exchange for the removal of nuclear-related sanctions imposed against Tehran.

US President Donald Trump pulled his country out of the JCPOA in May 2018 and re-imposed harsh sanctions against the Islamic Republic in defiance of global criticism.
On the first anniversary of the US withdrawal from the nuclear deal, Iran announced that it would suspend the implementation of some of its commitments under the deal, adding that it would stop exporting excess uranium and heavy water, setting a 60-day deadline for the five remaining parties to the deal to take practical measures towards ensuring its interests in the face of the American sanctions.

https://tn.ai/2029392
 

Persian Gulf

MEMBER
Joined
May 22, 2019
Messages
123
Reactions
62 1
Country
Iran
Location
United Kingdom
Japan PM Shinzo Abe arrives in Iran in bid to ease tensions as mediator




Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe arrived in Tehran on Wednesday as he tries to position himself as a mediator between Iran and the United States to help reduce heightened tensions between them. Abe, the first sitting Japanese prime minister to visit Iran since Takeo Fukuda in 1978, will hold talks with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani later in the day.

Abe's itinerary also includes a meeting with Iran's Ayatollah Ali Khamenei on Thursday. It will be the first time a Japanese prime minister has met with the supreme leader, who ultimately determines the country's policy direction.

"There are concerns over rising tensions in the Middle East. While the situation attracts the attention of the international community, for peace and stability in the region Japan wants to play a role as much as it can," Abe told reporters at Tokyo's Haneda airport before departing for a two-day visit to Tehran. "To ease tensions, I'd like to have a frank exchange of views" by taking advantage of Tokyo's traditionally friendly ties with Tehran, Abe said.

Abe's symbolic visit comes as Washington has left the door open for dialogue despite its abrupt withdrawal last year from the nuclear accord and the reinstating of economic sanctions. Japan is not a member of the deal but has been a supporter.

The trip gives Abe a rare opportunity to raise his diplomatic profile ahead of a Group of 20 summit in Japan on June 28 and 29 before an election for the upper house this summer. The challenges for Abe appear to be manifold, including smoothing the way for potential dialogue between Iran and the United States, Japan's longtime security ally, by helping bridge the rift between them. But Abe would not simply be a mediator, Japanese officials say, as Tokyo's aim is to ensure stability in the Middle East, a critical factor for resource-scarce Japan. Iran had long been one of the major oil exporters until the United States ended its sanctions waivers granted to Iranian crude buyers.

Before making the trip official, Abe secured backing from U.S. President Donald Trump, who was on a state visit to Japan in late May, for his efforts to reach out to Iran. Abe also spoke by phone with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and the crown princes of Saudi Arabia and Abu Dhabi.

Tensions in the Middle East have risen in recent weeks, roughly a year after Trump's decision to leave the international nuclear accord that led to the lifting of economic sanctions on Iran in exchange for its curbing of nuclear activities. Iran said in May it was suspending some of its commitments under the deal. Tehran set a 60-day deadline to negotiate new terms, saying it would keep more enriched uranium than allowed under the agreement initially reached with the United States, Britain, France, Germany, Russia and China. Washington has dispatched an aircraft carrier strike group and bombers to the Persian Gulf, and decided to send additional U.S. troops to the region.

Trump's more aggressive approach to Tehran has prompted a delicate balancing act by Japan, which marks the 90th anniversary of its diplomatic relations with Iran this year. Since returning to power in 2012, Abe has held seven meetings with Rouhani.

 

Eagle1

Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
4,405
Reactions
2,359 241 1
Iran has no intention of making nuclear weapon, Abe says
Comments come after Japanese Prime Minister meets with Khamanei
Published: June 13, 2019
Reuters
View attachment 7973
Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei meets with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Tehran, Iran June 13, 2019.


Tokyo: Iran has no intention of making or using nuclear weapons, Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei was quoted as saying on Thursday by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

“Supreme Leader Khamenei made a comment that the country will not and should not make, hold or use nuclear weapons, and that it has no such intentions,” Abe told reporters in Tehran following his meeting with Khamenei.

Abe’s comment was broadcast on Japanese public broadcaster NHK.

 

Persian Gulf

MEMBER
Joined
May 22, 2019
Messages
123
Reactions
62 1
Country
Iran
Location
United Kingdom
Mr. Shinzō Abe, the Prime Minister of Japan, met with Ayatollah Khamenei-- the Leader of the Islamic Revolution-- this morning June 13, 2019.

Pointing out the Japanese Prime Minister's remarks regarding the United States’ request to negotiate with Iran about the nuclear issue, Ayatollah Khamenei held: "The Islamic Republic of Iran negotiated for 5, 6 years with the United States and the Europeans—the P 5+1—which led to an agreement. But the United States disregarded and breached this definite agreement. So, what common sense would once again allow negotiations with a state that has thrown away everything that was agreed upon?"

The Leader of the Revolution quoted the Japanese Prime Minister again regarding the US determination to prevent Iran from building nuclear weapons and added: "We oppose nuclear weapons, and we have issued a religious fatwa (verdicts) prohibiting building nuclear weapons. But rest assured that if we wanted to build nuclear weapons, the U.S. would not be able to do anything about it, and the United States’ prohibition would not be an obstacle."

Insisting that stockpiling nuclear weapons is unreasonable, Ayatollah Khamenei remarked: "The United States has no competency, by any means, to speak out about what country should or shouldn't have nuclear weapons. Because the United States possesses arsenals of thousands of nuclear warheads."

 

Persian Gulf

MEMBER
Joined
May 22, 2019
Messages
123
Reactions
62 1
Country
Iran
Location
United Kingdom
Iran Rescues Oil Tankers’ Crew, Transfers Them to Jask Island

Iranian Search and Rescue vessel NAJI has managed to rescue 44 crew members of two oil tankers which had been targeted in the Sea of Oman, transferring them to the Iranian Island of Jask.

The two oil tankers, the Front Altair carrying the flag of Marshal Islands and the Panama-flagged Kokuka Courageous, caught fire for unknown reasons on Thursday morning some 40 kilometres south of Iran’s Jask Island.

Shortly after the incident, the Iranian rescue vessel NAJI approached them and managed to rescue the crew members and transfer them to Jask.
An informed source at the Iranian Armed Forces said after receiving call for emergency help from crew members of incident-hit vessels in Sea of Oman, several boats and choppers of Iranian Navy were dispatched to the scene along with rescue forces, and transferred some of the crew to Jask Port.


Video of rescued crew in Iran Jask Island:

 

Persian Gulf

MEMBER
Joined
May 22, 2019
Messages
123
Reactions
62 1
Country
Iran
Location
United Kingdom
The crew of the Japanese ship are disputing that they ship was damaged because of a mine, saying instead that a 'flying object' attacked them:

'Flying objects' damaged Japanese tanker during attack in Gulf of Oman

Two “flying objects” damaged a Japanese tanker owned by Kokuka Sangyo Co in an attack on Thursday in the Gulf of Oman, but there was no damage to the cargo of methanol, the company president said on Friday.

“The crew told us something came flying at the ship, and they found a hole,” Katada said. “Then some crew witnessed the second shot.”

Katada said there was no possibility that the ship, carrying 25,000 tons of methanol, was hit by a torpedo.


I think it's total rubbish, why would Iran attack a Japanese ship whilst Shinzo Abe is in Iran, the first visit by a Japanese PM to Iran since 1978?
 

Scorpion

THINK TANK
Joined
Nov 27, 2014
Messages
2,975
Reactions
2,110 25
Country
Saudi Arabia
Location
Saudi Arabia
Japan PM Shinzo Abe arrives in Iran in bid to ease tensions as mediator




Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe arrived in Tehran on Wednesday as he tries to position himself as a mediator between Iran and the United States to help reduce heightened tensions between them. Abe, the first sitting Japanese prime minister to visit Iran since Takeo Fukuda in 1978, will hold talks with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani later in the day.

Abe's itinerary also includes a meeting with Iran's Ayatollah Ali Khamenei on Thursday. It will be the first time a Japanese prime minister has met with the supreme leader, who ultimately determines the country's policy direction.

"There are concerns over rising tensions in the Middle East. While the situation attracts the attention of the international community, for peace and stability in the region Japan wants to play a role as much as it can," Abe told reporters at Tokyo's Haneda airport before departing for a two-day visit to Tehran. "To ease tensions, I'd like to have a frank exchange of views" by taking advantage of Tokyo's traditionally friendly ties with Tehran, Abe said.

Abe's symbolic visit comes as Washington has left the door open for dialogue despite its abrupt withdrawal last year from the nuclear accord and the reinstating of economic sanctions. Japan is not a member of the deal but has been a supporter.

The trip gives Abe a rare opportunity to raise his diplomatic profile ahead of a Group of 20 summit in Japan on June 28 and 29 before an election for the upper house this summer. The challenges for Abe appear to be manifold, including smoothing the way for potential dialogue between Iran and the United States, Japan's longtime security ally, by helping bridge the rift between them. But Abe would not simply be a mediator, Japanese officials say, as Tokyo's aim is to ensure stability in the Middle East, a critical factor for resource-scarce Japan. Iran had long been one of the major oil exporters until the United States ended its sanctions waivers granted to Iranian crude buyers.

Before making the trip official, Abe secured backing from U.S. President Donald Trump, who was on a state visit to Japan in late May, for his efforts to reach out to Iran. Abe also spoke by phone with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and the crown princes of Saudi Arabia and Abu Dhabi.

Tensions in the Middle East have risen in recent weeks, roughly a year after Trump's decision to leave the international nuclear accord that led to the lifting of economic sanctions on Iran in exchange for its curbing of nuclear activities. Iran said in May it was suspending some of its commitments under the deal. Tehran set a 60-day deadline to negotiate new terms, saying it would keep more enriched uranium than allowed under the agreement initially reached with the United States, Britain, France, Germany, Russia and China. Washington has dispatched an aircraft carrier strike group and bombers to the Persian Gulf, and decided to send additional U.S. troops to the region.

Trump's more aggressive approach to Tehran has prompted a delicate balancing act by Japan, which marks the 90th anniversary of its diplomatic relations with Iran this year. Since returning to power in 2012, Abe has held seven meetings with Rouhani.

LoL at the red roses. He came trying to de-escalate the tension but got his oil tanker bombed by the IRGC.
 

Top