Iranian Affairs

Persian Gulf

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Walikum As Salam!

Chitoray?
khoobam mersi, shoma chetori? ;)

[as a sidenote, this thread seems very anti-Iran and basically just a KSA propaganda perspective on Iran... from the first posts everything is posted by Saudis and about promoting ethnic separatism in Iran and how Iran promotes terrorism etc... I don't think that's appropriate for the "Iranian Affairs" thread, would Saudis be okay if Iranians make the same thing for a "Saudi Arabian Affairs" thread? But this is not my forum so I will play by the rules...]
 

Khafee

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khoobam mersi, shoma chetori? ;)

[as a sidenote, this thread seems very anti-Iran and basically just a KSA propaganda perspective on Iran... from the first posts everything is posted by Saudis and about promoting ethnic separatism in Iran and how Iran promotes terrorism etc... I don't think that's appropriate for the "Iranian Affairs" thread, would Saudis be okay if Iranians make the same thing for a "Saudi Arabian Affairs" thread? But this is not my forum so I will play by the rules...]
We post what pops up in the western media. You feel free to post (in English) any thing you feel like.
 

Persian Gulf

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With the first hit Iran will completely collapse. Arabs will claim there portion and will work with the collation.
Yes this is what Saddam thought as well... If Iranians Arabs fought for Iran against Arab Saddam why would they fight against Iran for non-Arab coalition?

i know they are fragile. and we wont show them mercy. check the decisive storm thread and read the article i posted
Thank you for enriching the "Iranian Affairs" thread with this language of threats and no mercy...
 

Persian Gulf

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We post what pops up in the western media. You feel free to post (in English) any thing you feel like.
I don't see much Western media sources. I see only KSA style anti-Iran propaganda. If you are objective and look through the first pages I am sure you will see the same thing... And that is fine, but I just don't think it's appropriate for an "Iranian Affairs" thread is my only point. But well, not my forum so I don't complain. I am only here to spread and gain knowledge :)
 

Khafee

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Iranian Stances Vary on Rouhani’s Demands for More Powers
Thursday, 23 May, 2019

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. (Reuters)

London - Asharq Al-Awsat

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani faced criticism after he renewed demands to reinforce his powers, while pro-government newspapers endorsed his call amid the increasing pressure by the US on Tehran.

Two weeks ago, the president criticized his limited influence in foreign policy and on Tuesday the IRNA news agency reported that he was seeking expanded, wartime executive powers to better deal with an "economic war" sparked by the US administration's pullout from the nuclear deal and imposition of severe sanctions

Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei expressed his dissatisfaction with Rouhani and how his team handled the nuclear deal also known as JCPOA.

"I did not believe in the way the JCPOA was done, and I have made this clear to the president and the foreign minister on many occasions,” he said.

Referring to a letter he sent to Rouhani, Khamenei stated: "Read my letter regarding the JCPOA and the conditions set for its ratification. But, if these conditions were not met, it is not the Leader’s responsibility to intervene."

The government has been insisting on powers that allow it to form an operations room to confront the economic war.

Guardian Council Spokesman Abbas Ali Kadkhodaei tweeted that former presidents enjoyed wide powers according to the constitution, and currently Rouhani has more powers that can meet the country’s demands.

He also blamed former presidents for not using their full powers to resolve the issues of the country.

Reformist Mostafa Hashemi Taba said that the government powers are “below expectations”, adding that the situation in Iran today is more difficult than the time of war.

The Kayhan newspaper slammed Rouhani for demanding more powers, accusing him of failing to provide solutions to Iran’s economic woes even before the US pulled out of the nuclear deal.

 

yavar

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Iran President Rouhani "we won't surrender 'even if bombed'
Iran says won't surrender 'even if bombed
Iran to defeat US, Israel, regional reactionaries: President Rouhani
'

 
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Khafee

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Trump says Iran nuclear deal possible as sanctions bite
May 27, 2019

TOKYO (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump said on Monday a deal with Iran on its nuclear program was possible, crediting economic sanctions for curbing activities Washington has said are behind a spate of attacks in the Middle East.

“I really believe that Iran would like to make a deal, and I think that’s very smart of them, and I think that’s a possibility to happen,” Trump said during a news conference with Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Tokyo.

“It has a chance to be a great country with the same leadership,” Trump said. “We aren’t looking for regime change — I just want to make that clear. We are looking for no nuclear weapons.”

Tensions have risen between Iran and the United States after this month’s attack on oil tankers in the Gulf region.

Washington, a firm backer of Tehran’s regional rival Saudi Arabia, has blamed the attacks on Iran, which denies the accusations.

The United States has deployed a carrier strike group and bombers to the Mideast region and an extra 1,500 troops to the Gulf, prompting fears of a conflict.

Trump’s comments came after his national security adviser John Bolton said on Saturday that the United States had “deep and serious” intelligence on threats posed by Iran, without providing details.


Trump, on a four-day visit to Japan, welcomed Abe’s help in dealing with Iran after broadcaster NHK said Japan’s leader is considering a trip to Tehran as early as mid-June. Iran said a visit was unlikely in the near future.

“I know for a fact that the prime minister is very close with the leadership of Iran, and we’ll see what happens,” Trump said.

During his joint news conference with Trump, Abe said Japan would do what it can on the Iran issue.

“Peace and stability of the Middle East is very important for Japan and the United States and the international community as a whole,” Abe said.

Trump last year withdrew the United States from a 2015 international nuclear deal with Iran, and is ratcheting up sanctions in an effort to end Iran’s international sales of crude oil and strangle its economy.

Japan was a major buyer of Iranian oil for decades before the U.S. sanctions — which Trump said were taking effect.

“They were fighting in many locations,” he said of Iran. “Now they are pulling back because they have serious economic problems.”

Bolton, who has spearheaded an increasingly hawkish U.S. policy on Iran, described recent bomb attacks on tankers off the United Arab Emirates and a pipeline pumping station in Saudi Arabia, as well as a rocket attack in Baghdad’s Green Zone as “manifestations of concern” about Iran.

Iran has distanced itself from the bombings and on Sunday, its foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, said his country will defend itself against any military or economic aggression.

Additional reporting by Tim Kelly; Writing by Tim Kelly and Malcolm Foster; editing by Darren Schuettler

 

Khafee

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U.S. sanctions policy threatens Middle East security: Iran deputy foreign minister
May 27, 2019 / Updated 8 minutes ago


GENEVA (Reuters) - Washington’s sanctions policy threatens the security of the Middle East, Iranian Deputy Foreign Minister Abbas Araqchi said on Monday, according to a statement on the ministry’s website.

Araqchi, while on a visit to Kuwait, also said Iran was ready for dialogue with other countries in the region.

Reporting By Babak Dehghanpisheh



 

Khafee

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US sanctions on Iran felt in Iraqi Shiite tourist districts
By BASSEM MROUE
26 May 2019


In this Wednesday, May 21, 2019, photo, pigeons fly outside the golden-domed shrine of Imam Moussa al-Kadhim in Kadhimiya district in north Baghdad, Iraq. Many shop owners in the Shiite holy neighborhood of Kadhimiya, have seen their sales drop sharply over the past year since U.S. President Donald began reimposing sanctions on Iran, home to the largest number of Shiite Muslims around the world. (AP Photo/Khalid Mohammed)

BAGHDAD (AP) — For years, Karar Hussein has sold sweets in his shop near the entrance to one of Shiite Islam’s holiest shrines, accepting whatever currency was offered to him by his clients, many of them religious tourists from neighboring Iran. But lately, when Iranian pilgrims ask about prices, he tells them he can only sell if they pay in Iraqi currency. They often walk out, disappointed.

Hussein and many other shop owners in Baghdad’s northern Shiite holy neighborhood of Kadhimiya have seen sales drop sharply over the past year since President Donald Trump began re-imposing sanctions on Iran, home to the largest number of Shiite Muslims around the world.

The value of Iran’s currency, the rial, has decreased almost fourfold, pushing the price of nearly everything beyond the reach of ordinary Iranian consumers in Iran and abroad.

Standing in his shop wearing jeans and a T-shirt, 27-year-old Hussein said his sales have dropped 30% since last year, but he still prefers not to be paid in Iranian rials because the currency’s value keeps depreciating. “Their currency is crashing,” he said.

Millions of Shiites from around the world come to Iraq every year to visit its many Shiite shrines and holy places, including the holy cities of Najaf and Karbala in southern Iraq and the central city of Samarra, home to the revered golden-domed al-Askari shrine. They bring large amounts of money into the country, where tourism is the second biggest source of income for state coffers after oil exports.

Since the fall of Saddam Hussein’s government in 2003, Iranians have made up the majority of religious tourists to Iraq, although tens of thousands come from other countries.

But tensions have been rising recently in the Middle East between the United States and Iran and there have been concerns that Iraq, whose government is allied with both Tehran and Washington, would become caught in the middle, likely increasing pressures on Iraq’s tourism sector.

A favorite tourist destination is the Kadhimiya district in north Baghdad, typically bustling with Iranians shopping for clothes, sweets and trinkets. The area is home to the al-Kadhimayn shrine, known for its two domes and four minarets draped with gold and contains the tombs of Imam Moussa al-Kadhim and his grandson Mohammed al-Jawad, two of Shiite Islam’s most revered figures.

On a recent afternoon in Kadhimiya, hundreds of Iranian pilgrims entered and left the shrine, passing by scores of shops on both sides of a pedestrian street leading to the holy site without buying anything.

“Money is a big problem for us. This is really hurting us,” said Iranian citizen Hussein Fazeli, as he left the shrine. Fazeli, who brings pilgrims from Iran to Iraq, said the number of Iranian visitors has dropped because many cannot afford to travel now.

Speaking in broken Arabic, Fazeli said Iran will end up victorious no matter how long the crisis takes, adding that “Trump will go, and Iran will stay.”
Iran’s currency has been declining steadily for years but the drop has accelerated in recent months after Trump’s decision to pull out of the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran and re-impose sanctions.

Mohammed Saadi Hadi, who inherited his tiny clothes stand outside the al-Kadhimayn shrine from his father, says sales have dropped by 70%. Prayer gowns for women now cost four times what they cost last year in Iranian currency. He used to sell 60 gowns a day but today he sells less than 10.

Thamer Jabbar, owner of a perfume store, said Iranian tourists now not only abstain from buying, but some of them bring with them items such as saffron spice and stone rings to sell in Iraq, hoping to make up for some of their trip’s cost.

Jabbar, 38, said his best days were after Iran and world powers signed the nuclear deal in 2015, which led to the lifting of sanctions on Iran and the release of billions of dollars of frozen assets. On a good day then, Jabbar would sell $700 worth of perfume.

“Today I barely sell anything to an Iranian tourist. Perfumes in Iran have become cheaper,” he said.

 

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Trump says Iran nuclear deal achievable as sanctions sting
May 27, 2019
Jeff Mason, Malcolm Foster

TOKYO (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump said on Monday a deal with Iran on its nuclear program was possible, crediting economic sanctions for curbing activities Washington has said are behind a spate of attacks in the Middle East.

“I really believe that Iran would like to make a deal, and I think that’s very smart of them, and I think that’s a possibility to happen,” Trump said during a news conference with Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Tokyo.

“It has a chance to be a great country with the same leadership,” Trump said. “We aren’t looking for regime change - I just want to make that clear. We are looking for no nuclear weapons.”

In Tehran, Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said Iran was not seeking nuclear weapons, which its supreme leader had banned in an edict, adding on Twitter that U.S. policies were hurting the Iranian people and causing regional tensions.

“Actions—not words—will show whether or not that’s @realDonaldTrump’s intent,” Zarif said.


President Hassan Rouhani said in October the United States was seeking “regime change” in Iran, adding that the current U.S. administration was the most hostile that the Islamic Republic had faced in its four decades.

Tensions have risen between Iran and the United States after this month’s attack on oil tankers in the Gulf region.

Washington, a firm backer of Tehran’s regional rival Saudi Arabia, has blamed the attacks on Iran, which denies the accusations.

The United States has deployed a carrier strike group and bombers to the and announced plans to deploy 1,500 troops to the Middle East, prompting fears of a conflict.

Trump’s national security adviser John Bolton said on Saturday that the United States had “deep and serious” intelligence on threats posed by Iran, without providing details.


Trump, on a four-day visit to Japan, welcomed Abe’s help in dealing with Iran after broadcaster NHK said Japan’s leader is considering a trip to Tehran as early as mid-June. Iran said a visit was unlikely in the near future.

“I know for a fact that the prime minister is very close with the leadership of Iran, and we’ll see what happens,” Trump said.

At his joint news conference with Trump, Abe said Japan would do what it can on the Iran issue.

Trump last year withdrew the United States from a 2015 international nuclear deal with Iran, and is ratcheting up sanctions seeking to end Iran’s international sales of crude oil and strangle its economy.

Japan was a major buyer of Iranian oil for decades before U.S. sanctions which Trump said were taking effect.

“They were fighting in many locations,” he said of Iran. “Now they are pulling back because they have serious economic problems.”

Bolton, who has spearheaded an increasingly hawkish U.S. policy on Iran, described recent bomb attacks on tankers off the United Arab Emirates and a pipeline pumping station in Saudi Arabia, as well as a rocket attack in Baghdad’s Green Zone, as “manifestations of concern” about Iran.

Iran has distanced itself from the bombings and on Sunday, Zarif said his country will defend itself against any military or economic aggression.

Additional reporting by Tim Kelly, and Dubai newsroom; Writing by Tim Kelly and Malcolm Foster; editing by Darren Schuettler and Howard Goller

 

Khafee

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Wife of Iran presidential adviser shot dead at home
AP
May 28, 2019
  • Mitra Najafi the second wife of Mohammad Ali Najafi was killed in northern Tehran
  • The victim was killed in her home
TEHRAN, Iran: A wife of an adviser to Iranian President Hassan Rouhani was shot and killed at her home, the semi-official ISNA news agency reported Tuesday.

The report said Mitra Najafi — the second wife of Mohammad Ali Najafi, a former reformist mayor of Tehran and a Rouhani confidant — was killed in northern Tehran. The report did not elaborate.

Such gun violence is incredibly rare in Iran, especially in the tony neighborhoods of northern Tehran, home to the country’s political and economic elite.

Another Iranian semi-official news agency, Tasnim, quoted Tehran prosecutor Mohammad Shahriari as saying she was killed by several gunshots, one of which hit her heart. Her body was found in a bedroom on the seventh floor of a residential high-rise in northern Tehran.

Najafi resigned as mayor in 2018, after hard-liners criticized him over a video showing he attended a dance performance by young girls at a school show.

Polygamy is legal in Iran, though some criticized Najafi on social media after he married Mitra Najafi.


 

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Rouhani to Khamenei: Iran Govt Maintained Nuclear Deal
Monday, 27 May, 2019


Iranian President Hassan Rouhani delivers a speech during the ceremony of the National Army Day parade in Tehran, Iran April 18, 2019. Reuters

London- Asharq Al-Awsat

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani responded Saturday to Iranian supreme leader Ali Khamenei's criticism for neglecting his recommendation on implementing the nuclear deal between Iran and six nations.

Rouhani said that his government is the main reason behind Iran's commitment to the nuclear deal, considering this an achievement by the government.

If it wasn’t for the government, Iran would have breached the nuclear deal, he added, boasting that his government’s performance prevented Iran's condemnation, while other countries slammed the US for exiting the deal.

In May 2018, US President Donald Trump pulled out of the nuclear deal and reimposed US sanctions because of Iran's regional role and its development of ballistic missiles.

Rouhani abstained from commenting further on Khamenei's criticism because it wasn't in Iran's interest.

Again, Rouhani showed readiness to turn to the Iranians to settle major disputes including the nuclear deal.

During his meeting with representatives from Iranian media, Rouhani said he proposed a referendum, on the nuclear issue to Khamenei back in 2004 while negotiating the nuclear deal. "Article 59 of the Constitution (referendum) is a deadlock breaker and could be a problem-solver at any junction," Rouhani said.

Article 59 stipulates that a referendum shall be held to settle any critical topic in the country. Iran hasn’t carried out any referendum for 30 years since the constitutional amendment endorsed by Khamenei.

Rouhani stated Saturday that the country is experiencing tough circumstances, but the government is seeking to prevent things from aggravating.


 

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