Iranian Affairs

Rakan.SA

MEMBER
Joined
Apr 7, 2015
Messages
551
Reactions
587 1
Country
Saudi Arabia
Location
Saudi Arabia
A comment from Iran’s former Ayatollah Khomeini that will literally make you want to vomit

i red it. that rat says you can have sex with a baby as long as you dont penetrate her. he slept with a 4 or 5 year old girl in iraq.
then they wonder why i hate shia! and the other problem is they do it in the name of islam! when they are not even muslim.
we will not rest until we destroy the man made religion and execute their leaders who caused so much death and harm to ppl including their own ppl. can you imagine how many child was rapped cuz of him ?!
 

Ahmed JO

MEMBER
Joined
Dec 4, 2014
Messages
161
Reactions
179
Country
Jordan
Location
USA
i red it. that rat says you can have sex with a baby as long as you dont penetrate her. he slept with a 4 or 5 year old girl in iraq.
then they wonder why i hate shia! and the other problem is they do it in the name of islam! when they are not even muslim.
we will not rest until we destroy the man made religion and execute their leaders who caused so much death and harm to ppl including their own ppl. can you imagine how many child was rapped cuz of him ?!
Well he says it's okay to penetrate a baby as long as you pay for her for the rest of her life and he has probably done something like this precisely. But to be fair, I think most Shia's would be disgusted by this too.
 

Rakan.SA

MEMBER
Joined
Apr 7, 2015
Messages
551
Reactions
587 1
Country
Saudi Arabia
Location
Saudi Arabia
Well he says it's okay to penetrate a baby as long as you pay for her for the rest of her life and he has probably done something like this precisely. But to be fair, I think most Shia's would be disgusted by this too.
i hate the religion not the ppl. bu the moment i find a shia who supports him or his ideology then he is a legitimate target for me. and unfortunately that leaves us with a lot of ppl who support him.
of course there are shia and shia arabs who dont support him or hizbulah at all.
 

BLACKEAGLE

SENIOR MEMBER
Joined
Dec 5, 2014
Messages
3,624
Reactions
1,983 10
Country
Jordan
Location
Jordan
Inside Iran: Millions continue to battle drug addiction


A drug addict smokes cigarette at drop-in center and shelter south of Tehran, Iran. (File: AP)

By Staff writer | Al Arabiya News
Thursday, 21 May 2015

At least six million Iranians are currently battling drug-related issues as the Islamic Republic continues to deal with a burgeoning drug trafficking industry.

The Financial Times reported the figure earlier this year, citing official records. An estimated 1.3 million are being treated for their addiction, according to Al Arabiya News Channel.

Rehabilitation centers can no longer absorb the growing number of those seeking help which prompted former addicts to set up their own rehab facilities.

The Iranian drug market is a versatile one. Opium continues to be popular due to the narcotic’s availability as Iran borders the drug’s biggest producer: Afghanistan.

“The geography is a huge problem here with the problems that exist in Pakistan and Afghanistan, Iran is the first country that a drug would enter in order to reach the real market which is in Europe and other parts of the world, so geography is clearly working against [the issue],” Trita Parsi, president of the National Iranian American Council told Al Arabiya News.

Iran’s answer

Sheesheh, or crystal meth, is the second most popular drug in the country. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, the country is the world’s fourth largest importer of pseudoephedrine, the main chemical used to make crystal meth.

Although several Iranian presidents have vowed to tackle this problem, efforts have been not as effective as some have hoped.
While Iran’s proximity to Pakistan and Afghanistan is a major factor in its drug problem, Parsi says authorities “have not been as effective as they would want to be.”

“…The very large number of people they are executing is an indication that they’re failing because if this large number of executions worked, it would have been mitigated by now.”

Separately, Al Arabiya News Channel reported that members of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard have not only condoned drug trafficking but have capitalized on the smuggling.

Last Update: Thursday, 21 May 2015 KSA 21:00 - GMT 18:00

http://english.alarabiya.net/en/perspective/features/2015/05/21/Inside-Iran-Millions-continue-battle-drug-addiction.html
 

BLACKEAGLE

SENIOR MEMBER
Joined
Dec 5, 2014
Messages
3,624
Reactions
1,983 10
Country
Jordan
Location
Jordan
Inside Iran: The wealth and power of the ‘Millionaire Mullahs’



A scan made Monday, Jan. 11, 2010 of a 2,000 rial Iranian banknote showing the Islamic Republic's revered founder Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini anda handwritten pro-opposition graffiti in Farsi in green reading "We are countless" and showing the "V" for victory sign. (AP)

By Shounaz Meky | Al Arabiya News
Monday, 18 May 2015

The second report of a new series by Al Arabiya News Channel takes a look at Iran’s “Millionaire Mullahs” – a phrase coined by the U.S.-based Forbes magazine – referring to a class of Iranian leaders who made large fortunes from the new government formed after the shah was overthrown in the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

Entitled “Inside Iran: ‘Millionaire Mullahs” the report gives an in-depth look at Iran’s post-revolution elites, as part of a special series tackling political, social and economic issues in the country.

The article titled “Millionaire Mullahs” by American journalist Paul Klebnikov in 2003 discusses the period after the revolution in which the assets of nationalized foreign companies and the country’s richest families were seized by a handful of clerics.

It also mentions how the clerics made millions of money from monopolizing charity funds and “everything else of value”—including banks, hotels, and car and chemical companies.



Majid Rafizadeh, an Iranian-American political scientist and scholar, explained in an interview with Al Arabiya News how the Iranian economy is “led by the state rather than private sectors,” thus creating a large obstacle for growth.

“The office of the Supreme Leader and IRGC have monopoly over main economic sectors, preventing the distribution of wealth and trickling-down of funds.”

“Iranian presidents, who are mainly part of the system, do not desire to challenge (or have the power) to change Iran’s economic system fundamentally through transferring state assets to public assets or promoting privatization.”

This state grab of power, along with sanctions imposed by Western powers on Iran for its ambiguous nuclear program “have also played a role in further weakening Iran’s economy and devaluating its currency,” Rafizadeh added.

Last Update: Monday, 18 May 2015 KSA 22:13 - GMT 19:13

http://english.alarabiya.net/en/perspective/features/2015/05/18/Inside-Iran-The-wealth-and-power-of-the-Millionaire-Mullahs-.html
 

kana_marie

MEMBER
Joined
Mar 18, 2015
Messages
273
Reactions
45
Country
USA
Location
USA
I'm going to apologize in advance for my ignorance. I started reading through the thread, and then I realized I have no idea what y'all are talking about. The map showing Persia, Arabistan, and so on... are these all different states or territories in the country of Iran, or am i misunderstanding? Why are all of them under Persia rule rather than their own? Where are you from? Are there religious differences between them or is it economical or political?
 

BLACKEAGLE

SENIOR MEMBER
Joined
Dec 5, 2014
Messages
3,624
Reactions
1,983 10
Country
Jordan
Location
Jordan
Inside Iran: despair, poverty fuels high suicide rate


the main causes for suicide in Iran are poverty, unemployment, and despair over lack of political change. (Shutterstock)

By Staff writer | Al Arabiya News
Wednesday, 27 May 2015

Last year, an estimated 13 Iranians committed suicide every day, while in 2013, around 4,000 people were said to have taken their own lives.

The ninth report of a series by Al Arabiya News Channel examines why Iran is said to have the highest suicide rate in the Middle East, as part of a special series tackling political, social and economic issues in the country.

According to experts, the main causes for suicide in the Islamic Republic are poverty, unemployment, and despair over lack of political change.
http://english.alarabiya.net/en/perspective/features/2015/05/28/Inside-Iran-despair-poverty-fuels-high-suicide-rate.html
 

Bubblegum Crisis

Professional
Joined
Dec 22, 2014
Messages
200
Reactions
229 5
Country
Saudi Arabia
Location
United Kingdom
Welcome to Fantasyland of mullahs. ~^~






Quote :

'Rich Kids Of Tehran' Instagram Raises Eyebrows

By Emily Thomas
Posted: 10/07/2014 6:21 pm EDT




An Instagram account called Rich Kids of Tehran is prompting headlines for more than just its subject matter.

The account, which is modeled on the popular profile Rich Kids Of Instagram and has been made private since news of its existence broke, posts photos of what appear to be members of Tehran's young elite galavanting around the Islamic Republic with fancy sports cars and designer watches. Since its first posting on Sept. 13, the profile has gathered over 50,000 followers.




The account is raising eyebrows, in part, for showcasing alcohol and young women who appear without the traditional hijab, or headscarf -- and, in several cases, clad only in bikinis. The BBC notes that Iranian law mandates that women cover their hair with a headscarf while in public and dress modestly; however, those rules are not enforced in private places, where some of the photos appear to be set. And though drinking alcohol is forbidden in the country, many members of the wealthy class imbibe in the privacy of their homes, according to The Independent.

The lavish displays of wealth and skin are a side of Iran seldom shown, but the account is also drawing attention because it was created on the heels of a government crackdown on social media activities. Last month, for example, seven young Iranians received suspended sentences of jail time and 91 lashes for posting a video online of themselves dancing to Pharrell’s “Happy.”

Many of those photographed are reportedly the offspring of the country's ruling class, leaving little room for fear of repercussion.

“Most of them have fathers who are untouchable,” an IT consultant in Tehran told the London Times. “If they get in trouble it will disappear.”

"Of course, as with everything else in Iran, there’s always a way to get what you want," wrote Egypt-based analyst Holly Dagres in the Middle Eastern news site Al-Monitor. "And as is made clear by this Instagram account, Iran’s elitist youth couldn't care less what rules are being implemented; they’ll just break them and continue being their spoiled, rich selves and party the night away."

In a posting Tuesday, the person or people behind the account announced that its purpose is apolitical -- and said not everyone who appears in its photos are residents of Iran.

"We Love our city of Tehran. We are in no way trying to put a difference between rich and poor. We are trying to show the world how beautiful Tehran and people from Tehran are. The Middle East is always on TV receiving negative attention and we just wanted to show that Tehran is not like that. This page is in no way political and we never had any bad intentions. We never thought the page would make headlines all over the world. Some of the people featured in this Instagram account don't live in Iran. [HASHTAG]#richkidsoftehran[/HASHTAG] [HASHTAG]#welovetehran[/HASHTAG]"



The flashy page has inspired counter social media accounts, including one called Poor Kids of Tehran. That account showcases life for some other residents of the capital. Although the Iranian government generally refuses to provide poverty statistics, according to PBS, government researchers said in 2011 that about half of Iran's urban population lives below the poverty line.

The Huffington Post


...


Need help ? <!?!>

Link : Google translate


Quote :

Cet Iran bling-bling qui dérange

La jeunesse dorée de Téhéran a posté sur Instagram des photos très osées pour changer l'image du pays dans le monde, s'attirant de nombreuses critiques.

Publié le 09/10/2014 à 14:04
Par Armin Arefi


Bienvenue à Téhéran, lance d'emblée la page Instagram "RichKidsofTehran" (Les enfants riches de Téhéran). Ici, les mosquées ont laissé place à des gratte-ciel. Les taxis collectifs de 1960 à des Ferrari. Les tchadors noirs à des minijupes. Telle est l'image de la capitale iranienne que souhaite montrer ce groupe créé il y a trois semaines. Étonnant dans une ville où les femmes ont l'obligation de porter le foulard islamique, où l'alcool est interdit, tout comme les relations sexuelles avant le mariage.




"Voici Téhéran City... Le vrai Téhéran dont vous n'entendez pas parler", affirme une de ces "bombes persanes" maquillées à outrance. "Cette initiative est entièrement logique", explique Sarah, Téhéranaise de 30 ans. "Depuis l'avènement de la République islamique en 1979, les médias occidentaux n'ont fait que montrer des images de pauvreté et de religion en Iran. Or, le monde ne sait rien de l'Iran, un pays où l'on s'amuse autant, si ce n'est plus qu'ailleurs."

Sexe, drogue et alcool




Les boîtes de nuit ont beau être proscrites, la rue, l'université et les coffee shops sont devenus en Iran le paradis de la drague. La nuit tombée, c'est à l'intérieur de leurs voitures que se retrouvent les jeunes. Vitres ouvertes et caissons de basse poussés au maximum, chaque sexe parade à tour de rôle, avant que ne soient lancées de véritables courses-poursuites effrénées, où le vainqueur décroche le Graal : un numéro de portable. Les plus chanceux sont invités à des fêtes privées - donc sans voile - où drogue, sexe et alcool coulent à flots derrière les volets fermés, la police ayant été payée pour ne pas déranger les invités.

"Étant donné le degré de pression que le régime exerce au quotidien sur les jeunes Iraniens, beaucoup d'entre eux virent dans l'excès", poursuit Sarah, qui assure que leur nombre est loin d'être négligeable à Téhéran. "Les filles passent des heures à se préparer à l'institut de beauté et les garçons à la salle de sport pour être au top physiquement le moment venu. Une soirée privée en Iran est l'équivalent d'une boîte de nuit en France à 4 heures du matin. Après s'être rués sur le whisky, et même l'absinthe, ils se précipitent sur la coke." Quelques clichés de jeunes femmes blondes peroxydées sont là pour l'illustrer.




Richesse décomplexée



Et le succès est au rendez-vous. Près de 88 000 personnes suivent désormais le compte "RichKidsofTehran". "Nous n'imaginions pas recevoir tant de publicité", écrit l'administrateur. "Nous vous prions de vous rappeler que nous ne sommes que de jeunes gens. [...] Nous avons créé cette page pour le fun, sur le modèle du compte RichKidsOfInstagram." À l'image de la version occidentale, la mouture iranienne rivalise de strass et de paillettes : bolides importés de Dubaï, montres de luxe ou résidences de standing offrant une vue imprenable sur les monts enneigés de la capitale, les sanctions internationales sont loin. Et les hashtags [HASHTAG]#luxe[/HASHTAG] #modèles [HASHTAG]#persian[/HASHTAG] [HASHTAG]#partu[/HASHTAG] ou [HASHTAG]#somptueux[/HASHTAG] inscrits au bas de chaque cliché viennent nourrir les pires stéréotypes sur les Iraniens, adeptes du "cheshm ham cheshmi" ("m'as-tu vu ?").



"Ces jeunes exposent leur richesse décomplexée et rompent ainsi avec les valeurs d'abnégation et de sacrifice imprimées par la République islamique, notamment durant les huit années de guerre contre l'Irak", pointe Azadeh Kian, professeur de sociologie à l'université de Paris VII-Diderot. "Or, paradoxalement, ces jeunes ne forment qu'une infime minorité du pays, qui s'est enrichie grâce à ses liens avec le pouvoir", poursuit la chercheuse. "Il faut être dans certains cercles pour accéder à cette richesse."

50 % de chômage

Une analyse que tempère la Téhéranaise Sarah, elle-même fille d'un grand entrepreneur. "Mon père a travaillé toute sa vie sans aucun lien avec le pouvoir", insiste-t-elle. "Le nombre d'immeubles construits chaque jour à Téhéran, de même que la proportion de voitures de luxe, suffit à comprendre comment ces gens s'enrichissent." Reste que d'après la Fédération internationale des droits de l'homme, plus de 50 % des 75 millions d'Iraniens vivent en dessous du seuil de pauvreté. Des rapports d'enquête ont même montré que le pouvoir d'achat de la population iranienne avait chuté de 72 % entre 2005 et 2013.

"Tandis que cette infime minorité expose son bien-être, l'écrasante majorité des Iraniens se bat aujourd'hui pour survivre", souligne la sociologue Azadeh Kian. "L'Iran compte 10 millions de chômeurs chez les jeunes, alors que ceux-ci sont de plus en plus formés. Faute de travail, 300 000 d'entre eux quittent le pays chaque année." Pour rétablir cette vérité, une page Instagram concurrente a été créée. Intitulée "PoorKidsofTehran"(pauvres enfants de Téhéran), elle dépeint un tout autre visage de Téhéran, avec son lot de mineurs contraints à travailler pour subvenir aux besoins de leurs familles, dans le sud de la capitale.


Censure


À en croire son créateur, 99 % de la richesse iranienne serait reversée à 1 % de la population. Réagissant aux nombreuses critiques, l'administrateur de "RichKidsofTehran" a fait son mea culpa. "Nous ne souhaitions d'aucune manière marquer une différence entre les riches et les pauvres. Le Moyen-Orient reçoit toujours de mauvaises publicités et nous souhaitions simplement montrer que Téhéran n'était pas comme cela. Cette page n'est pas du tout politique et nous n'avions aucune mauvaise intention."

Sauf que, au pays de la censure, l'initiative, désormais bloquée par les autorités iraniennes, pourrait coûter très cher à ses participants. En posant sans foulard, qui plus est parfois dévêtus, certains pourraient subir le même sort que les jeunes interprètes de la version iranienne de "Happy", de Pharrell Williams.

Le Point



Enjoy ! :~_~: (:-)


Link :

Rich Kids Of Instagram


...
 
Last edited:

Top