Non-Jews are forbidden to live in Israel, they must be sent to Saudi Arabia: chief rabbi says | World Defense

Non-Jews are forbidden to live in Israel, they must be sent to Saudi Arabia: chief rabbi says

Scorpion

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Non-Jews are forbidden by Jewish law to live in Israel, chief rabbi says

Jewish law forbids “goyim” – or gentiles – from living in Israel, the country’s chief Sephardic rabbi, Yitzhak Yosef, told followers in his weekly sermon.

Audio from the sermon was obtained by Channel 10, which was the first to air its contents.

Yosef is the son of the late Shas spiritual leader Ovadia Yosef, who was also known to make incendiary remarks about non-Jews.



“According to Jewish law, it’s forbidden for a non-Jew to live in the Land of Israel – unless he has accepted the seven Noachide laws,” Yosef is heard saying in the sermon.

“If the gentile is unwilling to accept these laws, then they must be sent to Saudi Arabia,” the rabbi said. “When there will be full, true redemption, we will do this.”

Earlier this month, Yosef ignited a firestorm of criticism when he said that religious law mandates the killing of an armed terrorist who is trying to commit a violent attack, and shouldn’t be afraid of being tried in court over such an action.

The chief rabbi’s comments generated strong criticism from MKs and NGOs, who said he should leave such matters to the heads of the security services and political decisions makers.

Yosef is the latest in a list of rabbis who in recent months have advocated killing terrorists while they are murdering innocent people, on the basis of a precept in Jewish law that permits killing a person seeking to kill you.

“If a terrorist is advancing with a knife, it’s a mitzva [commandment] to kill him,” said Yosef.

“One shouldn’t be afraid that someone will petition the High Court of Justice or some [army] chief of staff will come and say something different. There is no need to be afraid. ‘He who comes to kill you, get up and kill him,’” continued Yosef, citing the rabbinic dictum of self-defense.

“This also deters them. When a terrorist knows that if he comes with a knife he won’t return alive, it deters him, so therefore it’s a mitzva to kill him.”

Yosef stressed, however, that a murderous attacker who no longer has a weapon should not be killed, but rather put in prison for the rest of his life.

In mentioning the chief of staff, Yosef was referring to recent comments by Lt.-Gen. Gadi Eisenkot, who said in February the military should not operate according to this precept, adding that “a soldier should not empty a magazine of ammunition into a girl holding scissors.”

This was a reference to a controversial incident in November when two Palestinian teenage female attackers stabbed a 70-year-old Arab man (who they thought was Jewish) in the head with scissors and wounded another in downtown Jerusalem before security officers shot them. One of the terrorists was killed and the other critically wounded.

Non-Jews are forbidden by Jewish law to live in Israel, chief rabbi says - Israel News - Jerusalem Post



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Falcon29

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People always use religion for the wrong purposes, religion is losing it's spiritual basis and quickly descending into a politically themed one.
 

djordjem87

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Religion in this particular case is being used as a self defence measure. However the take on the killing terrorists because they are the ones with knives is take too seriously I believe. I don't think this guy meant literally kill them when you see them but more like we have to be able to realize we need to defend even if that means killing somebody. He has made a point by this short reference (I think) from some religious book.
 

pwarbi

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Religion and politics have always been very close and especially in places like the middle east but these days they're practically becoming the same thing.

Religion is getting less and less about what people believe and want, but more about what they think other people should believe and want.

Then they wonder why people are placing religion and war in the same sentence...
 

Diane Lane

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I think one reason people of many different faiths got along so well back home was that society was more secular, and people kept their religious conversations somewhat amongst themselves. I had a co-worker who would constantly try to shove her religion down my throat and the throats of others at the workplace. It was very upsetting, particularly because I'd never experienced that before. I see more of that down here where I live now, and I tend to prefer those conversations be kept private.

I have to say though, I have no problem with anyone killing someone who's attacking themselves or another. I'm a firm supporter of stand your ground laws, and wouldn't hesitate to use my right to self-protection or protection of another.
 

pwarbi

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I think one reason people of many different faiths got along so well back home was that society was more secular, and people kept their religious conversations somewhat amongst themselves. I had a co-worker who would constantly try to shove her religion down my throat and the throats of others at the workplace. It was very upsetting, particularly because I'd never experienced that before. I see more of that down here where I live now, and I tend to prefer those conversations be kept private.

I have to say though, I have no problem with anyone killing someone who's attacking themselves or another. I'm a firm supporter of stand your ground laws, and wouldn't hesitate to use my right to self-protection or protection of another.
Well they do say that religion and politics are two issues to avoid if you want to keep the conversation civil. Msybe that just goes to show that when it comes down to it, people tend to get very opinionated when discussing those two topics in particular and while there's nothing wrong with giving your opinion, to have a discussion you then have to listen to the other side of the argument.
 

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