North & South Korea News, Updates & Discussions | Page 9 | World Defense

North & South Korea News, Updates & Discussions

Khafee

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,564
Reactions
5,504 261
North Korea, US to hold working-level talks on Oct 5
01 Oct 2019

1569956225300.png

US President Donald Trump meets with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at the demilitarised zone separating the two Koreas, in Panmunjom, South Korea, on Jun 30, 2019. (REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque/Files)


SEOUL: North Korea and the United States have agreed to hold working-level talks on Saturday (Oct 5), North Korea's state news agency KCNA said on Tuesday, a development that would break months of stalemate since a failed summit in February.
"I can confirm that US and DPRK officials plan to meet within the next week," State Department spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus said.

Talks aimed at dismantling North Korea's nuclear and missile programmes have been stalled in a holding pattern since the second summit between US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Vietnam ended without a deal.

The two leaders had agreed to restart working-level talks at a surprise meeting at the heavily-guarded border between the two Koreas in June, but the outcome remained uncertain as North Korea repeatedly launched short-range ballistic missiles and often criticised the United States for continuing joint military drills with South Korea.

The two countries agreed to have preliminary contact on Oct 4, followed by the working-level talks, KCNA said, citing a statement issued under the name of Vice-Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui. It did not mention where the talks would be held, or give any more details.

"The delegates of the DPRK side are ready to enter into the DPRK-US working-level negotiations," Choe said in the statement, using North Korea's official name, Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK).

"It is my expectation that the working-level negotiations would accelerate the positive development of the DPRK-US relations."

Although North Korea has lately expressed willingness for working-level talks, messages carried by its state media attached a caveat that Washington should show more flexibility.

North Korea's chief nuclear negotiator Kim Myong Gil said in a statement last month that the United States should present the "right calculation method at the upcoming talks".

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in September that Washington was ready to meet North Korean counterparts and believed it was important to do so, although ousted former US National Security Adviser John Bolton warned on Monday that North Korea had no intention of giving up its nuclear weapons.

"We welcome the agreement between North Korea and the United States to proceed with working-level negotiations on Oct 5." South Korea's presidential Blue House said in a statement.

"Through this working-level negotiation, we hope that substantial progress will be made at an early date to achieve complete denuclearization and permanent peace on the Korean Peninsula."

Source: Reuters/hm
 

Khafee

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,564
Reactions
5,504 261
South Korea stands by fighter jet patrol over disputed Dokdo islets
Oct. 1, 2019
By Elizabeth Shim
1570016387400.png

South Korean F15K

1570016199000.png

South Korea's military flew fighter jets over the disputed Dokdo Islets (pictured) on Tuesday. File Photo by Yonhap

Oct. 1 (UPI) -- South Korea defended a decision to fly F-15K fighter jets over disputed islets in the East Sea following strong protests from Japan.

As part of a commemoration marking the founding of the military, Seoul's fighter jets had conducted a patrol over Dokdo, also known as Takeshima in Japan, South Korean news service News 1 reported Tuesday.

Japanese foreign ministry official Shigeki Takizaki called the South Korean embassy to express "deep regret," according to Japanese press reports.

Japan and South Korea each claim the islets as part of their territory. On Monday Takizaki reportedly said "Takeshima, as clearly reflected in history, is Japanese territory, even under international law."

Japan did incorporate Dokdo into its territory when it annexed the Korean Peninsula in 1905. Japan's claims are no longer valid following the end of World War II and colonial occupation, according to Seoul.

The Japanese diplomat also said South Korea flights are "unacceptable."

Taro Kono, Japan's new defense minister, said the flights would interfere with security cooperation between South Korea and Japan.

"I hope [South Korea] responds wisely," Kono said.

South Korea rejected Japan's claims to Dokdo. Seoul's military said Dokdo is "clearly the territory of the Republic of Korea" and protested Japanese statements.

South Korea flew four jets in observance of the 71st anniversary of the country's Armed Forces Day, over Dokdo and also the island of Marado. It patrolled other areas of the peninsula, including areas of the West Sea or Yellow Sea, according to News 1.

South Korea's relations with Japan remain strained at a time when Tokyo is cooperating with other partners on monitoring North Korea.

Japan's foreign ministry said Tuesday Canada and Japan have been cooperating in the surveillance of North Korean vessels engaging in illicit ship-to-ship transfers at sea, Yonhap reported.

Tokyo also said Canadian forces will be allowed to be stationed at Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, for the purpose of transshipment monitoring.

Kadena is a U.S. air force installation.
 

Khafee

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,564
Reactions
5,504 261
North Korea presence on Hambak Island is violation, Seoul lawmaker says
Oct. 2, 2019
By Elizabeth Shim
1570038855500.png

North Korea has deployed troops to a disputed island near Yeonpyeong Island (pictured), but Seoul has said it is not a violation of a past agreement. File Photo by Keizo Mori/UPI | License Photo

Oct. 2 (UPI) -- South Korea's main opposition conservatives are calling for a tougher response to the presence of North Korean troops on a disputed island near the western maritime border.

Lawmakers are slamming Seoul's position on the deployment of a North Korean platoon on Hambak Island, following a statement from Defense Minister Jeong Kyeong-doo, who said the North Korean maneuvers are not a violation of an inter-Korea military agreement signed in September 2018, News 1 reported Wednesday.

Suh Chung-won, a conservative lawmaker with no party affiliation, said North Korea's presence on an island the South also claims is a violation of law.

"Article 13 of the Armistice Agreement states commanders of both sides recognize a group of islands centered on Udo and includes Maldo, Udo and Hambakdo [Island] as [South Korean] territory," Suh said, during a parliamentary audit of the defense ministry. "For this reason, North Korea has not built military facilities there for 70 years."

Earlier in September the defense ministry told a parliamentary committee North Korea may have deployed a platoon to Hambak Island for monitoring purposes, including tracking the construction of military facilities at the Northern Limit Line, keeping an eye on defecting North Koreans and watching for Chinese fishing vessels.

Suh said Wednesday the presence of North Korean facilities is an issue.

"We could take military action. The presence of North Korea's military facilities at the southernmost tip of the West is a major problem," Suh said, according to Newsis.

The lawmaker also said the North was "doing bad things" by planning the military facility on Hambak Island before May 2017.

"We must be poised to take action in order to maintain security as outlined in the Armistice Agreement" of 1953, Suh said.

Earlier on Wednesday North Korea fired a submarine-launched ballistic missile, according to analysts.
 

Khafee

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,564
Reactions
5,504 261
Analyst: U.S. should 'test' Kim Jong Un
Oct. 15, 2019
By Thomas Maresca
1571154160100.png

This image, released Aug. 7 by the North Korean Official News Service (KCNA), shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un overseeing the country's fourth series of missile launches in less than two weeks a "warning" to South Korea and the United States over an ongoing joint military exercise. File Photo by KCNA/UPI | License Photo

SEOUL, Oct. 15 (UPI) -- As nuclear negotiations between North Korea and the United States remain at a stalemate and Pyongyang continues to launch new missiles, Washington should put Kim Jong Un's willingness to denuclearize to the test, defense analyst Bruce Bennett of research institute RAND Corp. said Tuesday.

Speaking at a forum at Seoul's Asan Institute for Policy Studies, Bennett said that despite repeated promises, Kim Jong Un has not taken any significant steps to denuclearize and has in fact increased his nuclear capacity since the failed Hanoi, Vietnam, summit between Kim and U.S. President Donald Trump in February.

"From an American perspective, it looks what we call 'bait and switch,'" Bennett said.

The analyst said that Washington should test whether Kim is willing -- or able -- to live up to his denuclearization pledge.

"President Trump should say to Kim Jong Un: 'Prove to me that you're serious,'" said Bennett. "Take one nuclear weapon. . . we'll send in American, British and French teams of nuclear specialists. They'll work with your personnel to take apart that weapon. Get rid of it.

"If Kim is not prepared to do that today, when will he ever be prepared to [dismantle] one out of 45 weapons he can clearly afford? Unless he doesn't want to do it himself. And there's reason to believe that's the case."

Bennett added that Kim may also not have the power to unilaterally dismantle a weapon if he doesn't have the support of the country's military elites.

"We always assume he's very powerful, that he can do whatever he wants to," said Bennett. "But can he really do anything he wants to, especially with nuclear weapons? Let's test and see."

In return, the United States can offer limited sanctions relief, said Bennett, such as reopening the Kaesong Industrial Complex, the joint inter-Korean manufacturing zone that was shuttered in 2016.

Bennett said he would also offer to invite the International Atomic Energy Agency to send inspectors into South Korea to confirm that there are no American nuclear weapons hidden in the South and to set a precedent for verification on the Korean Peninsula.

Negotiations between North Korea and the United States have stalled since the February Trump-Kim summit ended abruptly without an agreement, as both sides remained far apart on timing and details of denuclearization and sanctions relief.

A working level meeting on Oct. 5 in Stockholm, the first official talks since Trump briefly met Kim at the inter-Korean border in the DMZ in late June, broke down in hours with the North Korean side complaining that the United States remained inflexible.

"While having so far hinted at a flexible approach, new method and creative solution, the U.S. has heightened expectations," said North Korea's chief negotiator, Kim Myong Gil. "But it came out with nothing, greatly disappointed us and sapped our appetite for negotiations."

North Korea has continued to launch new missiles since the Hanoi summit, including its first submarine-launched ballistic missile, on Oct. 2.

Pyongyang has also tested a new type of short-range ballistic missile on several launches since May, which analysts have said is similar to Russia's Iskander missile. The missile is capable of complex flight patterns that make it much more difficult for missile defenses to detect and intercept.

U.N. Security Council resolutions ban North Korea from conducting any kind of ballistic missile launch.

Bennett said that it's important to emphasize the serious threat that North Korea poses to South Korea and potentially the United States, one that will continue to grow as Pyongyang develops its nuclear and conventional arsenal.

Bennett estimated that one nuclear blast from a 230-kiloton nuclear warhead, the size that North Korea tested in September 2017, would cause roughly 3 million casualties in Seoul or New York.

He added that North Korea's new Iskander-type missile would potentially be able to destroy eight or nine of the South Korean military's 12 air bases.

"My bottom line is we need to be more proactive in trying to address this threat," Bennett said. "This is a serious threat and we need to take it seriously in order to justify the things we have to do to fix the problem."
 

Khafee

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,564
Reactions
5,504 261
What Did America Offer North Korea at Working-Level Talks? One Report Claims To Know
October 15, 2019
And it makes absolutely no sense at all.
by Harry J. Kazianis

RTS2M3M4 - Copy.jpg


Do we finally know what U.S. negotiators offered North Korea at recent working-level talks that broke down in just a few hours? According to several news reports, citing just one anonymous source, we just might have an idea.

The offer might look familiar, as it is similar to a reported U.S. offer that had been in the press. According to the Korean outlet Hankyoreh which picked up a report in the Japanese newspaper Yomiuri Shimbun, the deal Washington pitched Pyongyang looked like this:
The US offered to temporarily suspend the ban on North Korean exports of coal and textiles as a reward for denuclearization. After the working-level meeting in Stockholm on Oct. 4-5, North Korea declared that the talks had broken down and claimed that the US had shown up “empty-handed.” The US State Department countered by saying it had brought “creative ideas.” The Japanese paper said that these “creative ideas” were the rewards offered during the talks.
The Japanese newspaper reported that the US had proposed two conditions for easing sanctions. First, the US asked North Korea to promise that it would hand over all nuclear weapons and materials in its possession and completely dismantle facilities related to nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and ballistic missiles. Second, it asked the North to completely dismantle its Yongbyon nuclear complex and to effectively halt its uranium enrichment activities. The US apparently indicated that, if North Korea agreed to those conditions, the US was willing to not only provisionally lift the embargo on coal and textiles but also allow humanitarian aid to the North and officially declare the end of the Korean War. According to the Yomiuri Shimbun, North Korea retorted that the US’ conditions were excessive and asked for all sanctions to be lifted.

The newspaper said that North Korea complained to the US that it hadn’t been rewarded for its suspension of intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) and nuclear weapon testing. Furthermore, North Korea asked the US to halt its joint military exercises with South Korea, stop deploying cutting-edge weaponry to South Korea, and to refrain from deploying strategic bombers capable of carrying nuclear weapons to the Korean Peninsula. According to the newspaper, the US responded by voicing its concerns about North Korea’s launch of the Pukguksong-3 missile, apparently launched from a submarine. The launch, US negotiators reportedly said, was entirely unhelpful for dialogue between the two countries.
This, of course, raises a lot of questions as there are key details that would have needed to be ironed out. First and most important, would North Korea give up its weapons of mass destruction, missiles, nuclear material and facilities before sanctions relief comes? Knowing how long that process could take--nevermind confirmed--we could be talking about years for Pyongyang to get any benefit if that is the case.

Second, how would the deal be implemented? This then opens the floodgates to many more questions. What would inspection teams look like? Who would be part of them? Who would determine if North Korea is following the terms of this deal? Are there snapback provisions if Pyongyang cheats?

There is also some strange problems with the deal, or at least the wording of the report. If America demanded the closure of the Yongbyon nuclear facility, wouldn’t that already be covered in the demand to close “completely dismantle facilities related to nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and ballistic missiles.” What facilities does this cover? Production? As you can see, this report leaves us asking more questions than gaining any sort of clarity, as there seem to be parts missing or jumbled in someway.

But in the end all of these questions are for nothing. Such a deal, if this was the offer to begin with, would have been a non-starter to North Korea as it essentially asks for something close to denuclearization in exchange for just a few sanctions removed. Good luck with that.
 

Khafee

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,564
Reactions
5,504 261
Samsung says fix coming for security-flawed Galaxy phones
By Nicholas Sakelaris
Samsung-says-fix-coming-for-security-flawed-Galaxy-phones - Copy.jpg

The company said a software fix will be available sometime next week. File Photo courtesy Samsung Electronics/UPI | License Photo

Oct. 19 (UPI) -- South Korean electronics giant Samsung said Friday it will offer a software fix for a major security flaw that allows anyone to bypass fingerprint security on its Galaxy S10 and Galaxy Note S10 devices.

The security defect, which was discovered this week, allows any fingerprint to unlock the phones if they are encased in a silicone shell. The case interacts with the phones in such a way that effectively fools them into accept any print.

"This issue involved ultrasonic fingerprint sensors unlocking devices after recognizing 3-dimensional patterns appearing on certain silicone screen protecting cases as users' fingerprints," the company said. "To prevent any further issues, we advise that [affected] users who use such covers to remove the cover, delete all previous fingerprints and newly register their fingerprints."

Samsung said a security patch will be issued next week. Until then, it also recommends owners against using front screen protectors on the devices.
Millions of S10 devices have been sold worldwide.

Samsung has not indicated whether the security flaw might also affect Galaxy S11 devices, which are expected to be released early next year.
 

Khafee

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,564
Reactions
5,504 261
South Korean students arrested after trespassing at U.S. ambassador's residence
OCT. 19, 2019
By Elizabeth Shim

South-Korean-students-arrested-after-trespassing-at-US-ambassadors-residence - Copy.jpg

South Korean university students climb over a wall during a protest against the Special Measures Agreement, at Habib House, the U.S. ambassador’s residence, in Seoul on Friday. Photo by Kim Chul-soo/EPA-EFE



Oct. 19 (UPI) -- More than a dozen South Korean university students were arrested on Friday after climbing into the U.S. ambassador's residence in Seoul.

A total of 17 students of a progressive inter-university coalition protesting U.S. military cost sharing were arrested at 2:57 p.m. after trespassing into the U.S. compound. They used a ladder to climb the wall of the residence, South Korean news service Newsis reported.

Two students who did not enter compound but were part of the group were also arrested, according to the report.

After climbing into the area by ladder, the protesters expressed opposition to U.S. demands that South Korea pay nearly $5 billion for basing 28,500 U.S. troops on the Korean Peninsula.

The students reportedly chanted, "Harris, leave this land," a reference to U.S. Ambassador Harry Harris, the top American envoy to Seoul.

Harris has publicly defended the U.S.-South Korea alliance as the linchpin of regional security. In a recent interview with a local paper, he also said Seoul pays only one-fifth of the cost of the U.S. military presence.

Harris had said Seoul should increase its contributions to $4.8 billion, a five-fold increase.

Kim Han-sung, president of the student coalition, told Newsis the students are condemning Harris' statement and that the demand places burden on South Korean taxpayers.

The next round of negotiations between the two countries is scheduled to take place Wednesday and Thursday in Hawaii, Yonhap reported Friday.

A South Korean foreign ministry official said the two sides are working closely for a "fair level of defense cost sharing," according to the report.

In February, South Korea agreed to raise its contribution by 8.2 percent and pay $915 million annually.
 

Khafee

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,564
Reactions
5,504 261
China and South Korea set to restart annual defence talks after five-year break
  • Vice-ministerial meeting was last held in 2014 as Seoul agreed to the deployment of a US anti-missile system
Laura Zhou
Published: 21 Oct, 2019

da047a14-f3c7-11e9-87ad-fce8e65242a6_image_hires_170258 - Copy.JPG

China and South Korea are expected to resume their vice-ministerial strategic defence dialogue after a five-year break. Photo: Reuters

China and South Korea are set to hold high-level defence talks on Monday for the first time since 2014, when tensions emerged over Seoul’s plans to allow deployment of a US anti-missile system.

Lieutenant General Shao Yuanming, deputy chief of the Joint Staff Department of the Central Military Commission, is expected to meet South Korean defence vice-minister Park Jae-min in Beijing, according to Yonhap News Agency.

They will talk on the sidelines at the Xiangshan Forum, a three-day gathering on Asia-Pacific security and defence which started on Sunday.
The defence ministry in Seoul said the officials were expected to “have in-depth discussions on the Korean peninsula security conditions and issues of mutual concern”, Yonhap reported.


f7e8269c-f3d7-11e9-87ad-fce8e65242a6_972x_170258 - Copy.jpg

Lieutenant General Shao Yuenming is expected to resume China’s part in a high-level defence dialogue with South Korea. Photo: Minnie Chan

Relations between China and South Korea were strained by Seoul’s decision to host American Terminal High-Altitude Area Defence system (THAAD) but ties have warmed as both countries have pushed back against pressure from the US.

Washington and Seoul are at odds over a cost-sharing agreement for the US military, with US President Donald Trump demanding South Korea contribute more for the presence of US forces.

Hwang Jae-ho, director of the Global Security Cooperation Centre at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies in Seoul, said the meetings, formally known as the China-South Korea vice-ministerial strategic defence dialogue, resumed mainly because the countries now had more mutual interests.

“Now China has to make more friends in the international community as its ties with the United States have gone bad, and South Korea is looking for China to help rein in Pyongyang. At a time like this, it’s inevitable for the two countries to want to move closer,” Hwang said.

The deployment of THAAD, a proposed military hotline, and South Korea’s air defence identification zone are expected to be high on the agenda.
First held in 2011, the defence dialogue was hosted alternately by Seoul and Beijing. It was suspended in 2015 when South Korea, then under president Park Geun-hye, said it was considering THAAD as a deterrent against North Korea’s nuclear ambitions.

Beijing disapproved and said China was the real target. Each country then placed unofficial economic and cultural bans on the other. These included Chinese sanctions against South Korea’s Lotte supermarket chain and a ban on TV airtime for South Korean bands.

Tensions began to slowly ease after November 2017, when the two countries said they had decided to set aside their differences and advance their strategic partnership. Seoul also promised not to host additional THAAD missiles nor join a US-led missile defence system that involved Japan.
Additional reporting by Kristin Huang
 

Top