Ohio can again try to execute man after failed attempt: court | World Defense

Ohio can again try to execute man after failed attempt: court

Scorpion

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Ohio can again try to execute man after failed attempt: court


Death row inmate Romell Broom is seen in an undated picture from the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction.
REUTERS/ OHIO DEPARTMENT OF REHABILITATION AND CORRECTION/HANDOUT VIA REUTERS

The Ohio Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday that the state could again try to execute convicted killer Romell Broom after failing to do so seven years ago.

In a 4-3 ruling written by Justice Judith Lanzinger, the court said the state would not violate the U.S. Constitution's ban on cruel and unusual punishment or double jeopardy by executing Broom, a Cleveland man sentenced to death for murdering 14-year-old Tryna Middleton in 1984.

If Broom is put to death, he would be the first person on which a second execution has been attempted in the United States since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated capital punishment in 1976, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

Broom’s attorney, Adele Shank, said she had not yet read the full court opinion but was disappointed and would not rule out appealing to the U.S. Supreme Court due to the case's Constitutional issues.

No new date has been set for Broom’s execution.

There have been eight executions in the United States so far this year, according to the Death Penalty Information Center. Last year, there were 28 executions, the fewest since 1991. A legal fight over drugs used in a series of botched lethal injections has contributed to the continued decline in the number of executions.

Ohio's execution of Broom in 2009 was called off after two hours when officials failed 18 times to attach intravenous needles to administer the chemicals used in the process.

Broom's lawyers appealed, saying a second attempt violated the 8th Amendment's cruel and unusual punishment statute and the 5th Amendment's right against double jeopardy.

In April 2011, a Cuyahoga County court found that repeated needle sticks were "unpleasant" but not in violation of Broom's constitutional rights. Broom then appealed to the Ohio Supreme Court.

Lanzinger agreed with the lower court. “There is no question that lethal drugs did not enter Broom’s body,” she wrote. "The execution attempt was halted after preparations to establish a viable IV line were unsuccessful."

In dissent, Justice Judith L. French stated: “If the state cannot explain why the Broom execution went wrong, then the state cannot guarantee that the outcome would be different the next time.”

Ohio in 2015 delayed all scheduled executions until 2017 due to the difficulty obtaining the drugs needed for lethal injections. One of 31 U.S. states with the death penalty, it has not executed an inmate since January 2014 and had planned 11 executions in 2016.



(Reporting by Kim Palmer, Editing by Ben Klayman, G Crosse and Alan Crosby)
Ohio can again try to execute man after failed attempt: court| Reuters


@TOPIC: I don't see human rights organization speaking about this and also about capital punishment in the U.S in general but when it comes to Saudi Arabia they jump the gun. Total hypocrisy.
 

Diane Lane

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I think it's ridiculous to worry about the unpleasantness of needle sticks when this man has been charged and found guilty of murdering a teenager. I'm tired of all of the concern for monsters who seem to walk unfettered throughout our societies, targeting the innocent. I find it difficult to believe officials were unable to attach the intravenous needles 18 times. It sounds as if someone needs to be sent for more training. This should have been concluded long ago.
 

arthnel

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I know the law has a place and we are a country of laws. I'm sorry if I offend anyone (I'm such a liar). My heart goes out heavily for that fourteen year old and her family who want justice. We can never accept a world where people carry out brutal murders and find loopholes in the law to keep their own. He gave up the right to live when he took that little girls life.
 

Diane Lane

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Yes, @arthnel, I also sympathize much more with the victims of such attacks, than with the perpetrators. There are way too many people like this out in society that need to be caught, and we should be focusing on them, rather than wasting our time (and tax dollars) belaboring the point with this miscreant. The death penalty has become a joke. Those convicted under it languish for years in prisons at taxpayer expense, filing appeal after appeal, hoping to get off on a technicality, while the families and friends of their victims have to live the rest of their lives without their loved ones.
 

explorerx7

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My problem is that small countries around the Caribbean are pressured by United States Governmental organizations to abolish the death penalty because they believe it's violating human rights. However, they are executing people withing their own borders contrary to what they are preaching to others.
 

djordjem87

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I already stated here and elsewhere that I am against death penalty. What good is there from it? That guy should be supervised and sent to help in some hard work. Anyway, this attempts sound ridiculous. What about explanation? Everything is a bit shady and I am curious about what really happened. Again, I understand that he killed a teenager but killing him will not do any good to anyone and it will not bring that teenager back. So his death is not reasonable and by killing him we become like him and others. Just murderers and killers.
 

pwarbi

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First of all, seeing as the death penalty is a law and this guy as been found guilty and sentenced to death, I have no issues with it being done now after the failed attempt.

This excuse for a man murdered a teenage girl, what second chance did she have in life? I'm sure that at the time of the killing he hadn't any second thoughts so why should we now?
 

Diane Lane

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I support the death penalty, because there's always a chance of a re-offense. Unless the killer is dead, there's a chance of escape, acting out in prison that results in the injury or death to others, and of course let's not forget that some politicians free prisoners with a stroke of their pen.

I agree with @pwarbi that this is a law, and just as with other laws, we must follow it. Otherwise, why not just throw them all out, and live in anarchy? As a society, we owe it to the families of those harmed and murdered to ensure that those doing the harming/killing are caught and punished, not only as a result of what was done to their loved ones, but also for the safety of others.
 

pwarbi

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I support the death penalty, because there's always a chance of a re-offense. Unless the killer is dead, there's a chance of escape, acting out in prison that results in the injury or death to others, and of course let's not forget that some politicians free prisoners with a stroke of their pen.

I agree with @pwarbi that this is a law, and just as with other laws, we must follow it. Otherwise, why not just throw them all out, and live in anarchy? As a society, we owe it to the families of those harmed and murdered to ensure that those doing the harming/killing are caught and punished, not only as a result of what was done to their loved ones, but also for the safety of others.
I think it's always going to be a controversial topic, the death penalty, especially seeing as these days there seems to be a lot more people that have been given life sentences that have later been proved to be innocent and been set free.

In this case though, that isn't the issue and the criminal is still guilty of the crime, there isn't a retrial or new evidence that puts any doubt on what happened, so like I said the original sentence should stand in my opinion.
 

Jason76

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The death penalty doesn't solve any problem. It just ends another human life. It's especially cruel when it has to be done more than once. When will humanity rise above the death penalty?
 

pwarbi

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I doubt that the family and friends of the teenage girl this man murdered will have the same amount of sympathy as you seem to have for this killer.

I'm not saying that the death penalty is right or wrong, but in this case just because it didn't work the first time, to me, that doesn't mean he should get a reprieve.
 
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