Possible acquisition of J-15 for PAF- Air Superiority & Deep Strike Platfrom | Page 3 | World Defense

Possible acquisition of J-15 for PAF- Air Superiority & Deep Strike Platfrom

TomCat

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MystryMan

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J-15/15S/T Flying Shark/Flanker

The J-15 #108 was landing at the SAC airfield. J-15 (H/JJ15?) is the first generation of Chinese carrier-borne fighter aircraft being developed by both 601 Institute and SAC for PLAN's first generation aircraft carriers including Liaoning. In order to save time and cut cost, the aircraft was developed based on Russian Su-33 in terms of structural configuration and flight control system as well as domestic J-11B (see above) in terms of radar and weapon systems. Similar to Su-33, J-15 features enlarged folding wings/horizontal tails, strengthened landing gears with twin nose wheels, an arresting hook, a pair of small canard foreplanes to improve its low speed handling and shortened tailcone to avoid tail-strike during high AoA landing. Composite materials are used in certain areas such as vertical tails to reduce weight. Some key shipborne aircraft technologies such as landing/navigational systems are believed to have been obtained from Russia and Ukraine. The aircraft also features a retractable IFR probe on the port side and can carry a Russian UPAZ-1A buddy refueling pod under the centerline station. This enables J-15 to take off with a full weapon load and fly a long-range attack/interception mission via inflight refueling from another dedicated J-15 tanker. One Su-33 prototype (T-10K-3) was acquired from Ukraine around 2001 and has been studied extensively. Some components onboard J-15 are based on those of J-11B, such as the glass cockpit with 7 LCDs, MAWS sensors on the tail sting as well as the improved WS-10H turbofan engine with a higher TO thrust (12,800kg) and better acceleration in order to achieve full-load taking off from the ski-jump. In addition it appears to have a new indigenous IRST/LR installed. Its fire-control radar is thought to be based on the Type 1493 PD radar with enhanced air-to-sea capability. It can also carry a variety of Chinese designed precision weapons, including PL-8, PL-12 AAMs, YJ-83K AShM, and possibly YJ-91A AShM. There was a rumor that J-15 is able to carry the new YJ-12 supersonic AShM under its centerline station but this has not been confirmed. Overall J-15 is believed to be in the same class of American F/A-18C, thus more versatile than Su-33. However J-15 is expected to have a limited production and deployment since its technology is no longer state of the art, but it is also expected to be upgraded in the future with an AESA radar similar to the one installed on J-11D. Some specifications of J-15 (estimated): max speed Mach 2.17, max combat radius 1,270km, weapon load 6.5t. The first prototype (dubbed J-11C?) was assembled at SAC in 2008. Its maiden flight took place on August 31, 2009, powered by two Russian AL-31F turbofan engines. The first takeoff from a land based simulated ski-jump occurred on May 6, 2010 at CFTE. Additional J-15 prototypes (#554 & 557?) were seen wearing a light naval blue color scheme and powered by two WS-10H engines. However the WS-10H onboard #554 were later replaced by the more reliable AL-31F turbofan. At least 7 prototypes (S/N 551-557) were undergoing various tests on the simulated flight decks on land, mostly powered by Russian AL-31F turbofans. It started to practice touch-and-go landings on the deck of Liaoning during her sea trials in summer 2012. On November 23, 2012 J-15 prototypes #552 and 553 landed and took off officially for the first time on Liaoning, marking a concrete step for both J-15 and the aircraft carrier to achieve full operation status. J-15 prototypes were seen conducting taking off and landing tests onboard Liaoning carrying various air-to-air and air-to-surface weapons in September 2013. The 01 batch J-15s (J-15A? S/N 100-109) started to be handed over to PLAN Carrier Fighter Group in late 2013, carrying a 3-digit serial number and powered by AL-31F engines. They have been stationed onboard Liaoning since late 2014. The 02 batch (S/N 110-123) J-15s delivered to PLAN first appeared in October 2015. A twin-seat trainer version (dubbed J-15S) has been under development too. Its prototype first took off from SAC airfield on November 3, 2012. Similar to J-16 for PLAAF, J-15S is powered by WS-10H engines (14t class?) and features a modified canopy for better forward view from the back seat. The twin-seater could evolve into a dedicated EW aircraft in the same class of American EA-18G based on similar technology onboard J-16D. Currently one J-15S prototype (#561) is being evaluated at CFTE, wearing a standard "Flying Shark" naval blue color scheme. It was first rumored in October 2014 that a CATOBAR variant is being co-developed by the 601 Institute and CSIC 704 Institute. This variant features a further strengthened forward landing gear in order to withstand the high-g force during the acceleration. In July 2016 the first prototype of the CATOBAR variant (J-15T? #5x1) flew for the first time, powered by two indigenous WS-10H engines. It features a nose landing gear with a much longer and wider drag strut. The production units are expected to be stationed onboard the third Type 003 aircraft carrier to be constructed in the future. It was rumored in November 2016 that a J-15T took off successfully for the first time from a ground-based electromagnetic catapult (EMALS). A recent rumor (April 2017) suggested that the production of J-15A ended after 2 batches of 24 units for the Type 001 aircraft carrier. It was speculated to be followed by the improved J-15B (the 3rd batch, S/N 2xx?) which could feature a new AESA radar developed by the 607 Institute and carry the new PL-10/PL-15 AAMs. J-15B is expected to be stationed onboard the indigenous Type 002 aircraft carrier launched in 2018. The latest video (May 2018) indicated that J-15 has practiced taking off and landing at night in an effort to achieve full operational capability. The latest video (December 2018) suggested that at least one J-15S is in service with PLAN.
- Last Updated 7/13/19
 

MystryMan

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J-15D Flying Shark/Flanker

This EW variant of J-15S (J-15D/J-17?) was developed based on the experience of J-16D. As the result the pure trainer version (J-15S) was thought to have been axed. The first prototype of J-15D was rumored to have flown on October 25, 2016 and a prototype in full standard flew in early 2018. The aircraft carries two large wingtip ESM/ELINT pods similar to those onboard J-16D, with the windshield IRST/LR removed as well. Additional conformal antenna fairings have been identified throughout the aircraft. J-15D has also been speculated to feature an AESA radar. The pilot in the rear cockpit serves as the weapon system officer. It is also expected to carry two large ECM pods under the wings and one underneath the fuselage plus a new type of ARM based on the PL-15 AAM. J-15D is expected to be stationed onboard the indigenous Type 002 aircraft carrier.
- Last Updated 2/2/18

Fighters II
 

TomCat

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J-15D Flying Shark/Flanker

This EW variant of J-15S (J-15D/J-17?) was developed based on the experience of J-16D. As the result the pure trainer version (J-15S) was thought to have been axed. The first prototype of J-15D was rumored to have flown on October 25, 2016 and a prototype in full standard flew in early 2018. The aircraft carries two large wingtip ESM/ELINT pods similar to those onboard J-16D, with the windshield IRST/LR removed as well. Additional conformal antenna fairings have been identified throughout the aircraft. J-15D has also been speculated to feature an AESA radar. The pilot in the rear cockpit serves as the weapon system officer. It is also expected to carry two large ECM pods under the wings and one underneath the fuselage plus a new type of ARM based on the PL-15 AAM. J-15D is expected to be stationed onboard the indigenous Type 002 aircraft carrier.
- Last Updated 2/2/18

Fighters II
The blogspot you quoted is a heaven for chinese weap info. I forgot this site earlier, tried to look for it. Thanks for sharing
 

PewPew

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Isn’t sight/display the same thing pal “¡¡“
Sight is an older solution, it only offers cueing with the WVRAAM. Display does that plus provide some information to the pilot via a small CRT screen. The evolution to that is the helmet projecting the info to the visor (only Striker 2 offers that).
 

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Sight is an older solution, it only offers cueing with the WVRAAM. Display does that plus provide some information to the pilot via a small CRT screen. The evolution to that is the helmet projecting the info to the visor (only Striker 2 offers that).
Can you do a thread on HMS/HMD - JHMCS 2 / Striker2 etc ?
 

TomCat

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Sight is an older solution, it only offers cueing with the WVRAAM. Display does that plus provide some information to the pilot via a small CRT screen. The evolution to that is the helmet projecting the info to the visor (only Striker 2 offers that).
So what you are suggesting is an iris/eye axis controlled head movement based active missile cueing system through and an HMD. Such that in a dogfight, pilot just have to have his head locked on to the target thus missile following the specific coordinates of target
 
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Sir how can i forget this machine i was talking about Jets and this machine i think particularly belongs to PAA. Last year their hanger construction tendr was floated 3 zulus with Pakistan AA colours also spotted and stored in USA but after last these news nothing shown up till date hope they release these machines to us soon.
 

PewPew

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So what you are suggesting is an iris/eye axis controlled head movement based active missile cueing system through and an HMD. Such that in a dogfight, pilot just have to have his head locked on to the target thus missile following the specific coordinates of target
Yup. The HMD/S cues the target for the WVRAAM, no need to point the plane in the direction of the target, the HMD/S cue feed will give the WVRAAM info on where to go. Likewise for air-to-ground; the HMD/S can direct a targeting pod's EO/IR.
 

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Don’t Underestimate China’s Flying Shark
The evolution of the J-15 Into a world leading carrier-based fighter and its implications.
By Abraham Ait
November 17, 2018


Don’t Underestimate China’s Flying Shark

Credit: Wikimedia Commons/ Garudtejas7


Since their entry into service in 2012 onboard China’s first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, the J-15 Flying Shark twin engine air superiority fighter has been frequently criticized for its highly limited capabilities. The fighter’s heavy weight combined with the lack of either steam or electromagnetic catapult systems (EMALS) onboard the Liaoning meant that the J-15 was seriously restricted in its fuel carriage and weapons payload — resulting in a missile arsenal a fraction the size of those deployed by U.S. Navy’s jets and a negligible combat radius around the carrier. The aircraft’s lack of advanced radar evading capabilities, at a time when the U.S. and British navies were preparing to induct their first carrier based stealth fighters — the F-35B and C variants — gave further grounds to criticize the J-15’s potential. Perhaps most significantly, however, the three accidents involving J-15 fighters in their first half decade of service were cited by many analysts as proof that China was far from capable of becoming a major carrier power for the foreseeable future — at least not until the Flying Shark could be replaced by a lighter and more reliable fighter.

Despite the considerable criticism the Flying Shark has weathered and the underwhelming capabilities of the jets currently in service onboard the Liaoning, a deeper analysis of the airframe’s full potential — particularly when deployed from more modern carriers currently under construction — indicates that the Chinese jet could well emerge as one of the world’s foremost carrier-based fighters in the near future.

The J-15 was developed as a carrier-based variant of the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) J-11B air superiority fighter, and its airframe and role are almost identical to those of the Russian Su-33 carrier-based jets, which entered service in the 1990s — themselves developed as carrier variants of the Su-27. Indeed, access to a prototype Su-33 acquired from Ukraine was critical to allowing the Shenyang Aircraft Corporation to develop the J-15 from the land-based airframe. The Su-33, much like the J-15, is poorly suited to operations from carriers of the Kuznetsov class, which lack catapult launch systems – that class includes both the Liaoning and Russia’s own sole carrier, the Admiral Kuznetsov. The Russian naval fighter thus faces many of the same payload and fuel restrictions, and largely as a result of this was operated from longer airstrips on land for over 90 percent of its sorties during recent combat operations in Syria. The Su-33, however, was never initially conceptualized to be operated from such carriers, and was intended to primarily operate from the decks of the Soviet Ulyanovsk class supercarriers — gargantuan warships comparable to the U.S. Nimitz class, which would have been equipped with steam catapults. When operating from such vessels, the Su-33 would have provided the Soviet (and later Russian) Navy with an analogue to the U.S. F-14 Tomcat — a lethal twin engine heavy fighter capable of dominating the skies and contesting air superiority at sea.

The J-15’s airframe, like that of the Su-33, has extremely high potential when operating from a more suitable carrier. It is important to take into account the Liaoning’s nature primarily as a training carrier, and as a result the role of J-15 fighters currently in service is to provide the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) with its first experience operating carrier-based combat jets. Future warships such as the Type 003 however, currently under construction, will have far larger decks capable of launching multiple aircraft simultaneously and, most critically, will field electromagnetic catapult systems allowing the J-15 to launch will a full fuel tank and missile payload. Flying Sharks have been observed by satellite for a number of years already testing land-based runways simulating carrier conditions with EMALS, a force multiplier for the fighter’s capabilities. This could very likely make the J-15 the most heavily armed and longest ranged carrier-based fighter in the world — with an operational altitude approximately 4 kilometers higher than the U.S. Navy’s far lighter F-18E and F-35 carrier-based jets and a significantly higher speed and longer range.

While the J-15 has been criticized as being too heavy to operate from carrier decks, on larger carriers equipped with EMALS systems this will not be an issue. Indeed, the F-14 Tomcat operated by the U.S. Navy was considerably heavier despite relying on a less powerful steam catapult system — and was still considered one of the most successful carrier-based fighters ever developed. Furthermore, with the Tomcat retired in the aftermath of the USSR’s collapse (largely due to its massive operational costs and maintenance requirements), the U.S. Navy lacks an air superiority fighter of its own — seriously undermining the service’s ability to engage a near peer carrier strike group at sea with their own air superiority jets. As Bob Kress and Rear Admiral Paul Gillcrist, USN (Ret.) noted in 2002 regarding the Tomcat’s retirement and the less impressive performance of its lighter replacement, the F-18E:

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Though it’s a whizzy little airshow performer with a nice, modern cockpit, it has only 36 percent of the F-14’s payload/range capability. The F-18E Super Hornet has been improved but still has, at best, 50 percent of the F-14’s capability to deliver a fixed number of bombs (in pounds) on target. This naturally means that the carrier radius of influence drops to 50 percent of what it would have been with the same number of F-14s. As a result, the area of influence (not radius) drops to 23 percent!
The tremendous advantage of operating a heavier and higher end fighter, which the military no longer perceived a need for with an apparent end to great power competition, could well soon be a factor in China’s favor once the J-15 is deployed from the decks of upcoming EMALS equipped carriers.

Regarding claims that the J-15 is unreliable due to the number of accidents it has suffered, it is important to recognize both that China has no experience whatsoever operating carrier-based fighters — making some accidents inevitable — and that carrier-based fighters fielded by other states have had accidents as frequently if not more so in their first years in service. One key example is the F-14, which saw a phenomenal number of losses to crashes, approaching 40 jets in its first half decade of service alone. Of the 712 carrier-based Tomcats produced, over 160 were lost to accidents, and 28 percent of all accidents were attributed to issues with the engine. Judged by the standards of China’s J-15, the F-14 would be considered a failure many times over, but it went on to become one of the most successful jets of the Cold War and a key component in ensuring undisputed American blue water primacy until the Soviet Union’s collapse. The J-15’s potential thus cannot be dismissed as a result of its safety record, which all things considered is rather low.

What about the J-15’s ability to contend with rival fighters at sea and its apparent lack of sophistication relative to the latest combat jets fielded by the U.S. Navy? Considering the significant enhancements that have been made to the design of its land-based counterpart the J-11B since 2012 to develop the J-16 and J-11D “fourth generation-plus” fighters, it is very likely that future J-15 variants will be equipped with similar enhancements to their airframes. Some of these upgrades may well be based on the technologies of the Russian Su-35, an advanced derivative of the Su-27 recently acquired by the PLAAF, including three dimensional thrust vectoring capabilities and a radar cross section reducing airframe. Further upgrades currently planned for the J-11D, include radar absorbent coatings, an AESA radar, and the ability to deploy PL-15 ramjet powered air-to-air missiles, which retain a considerable advantage in range over their U.S. analogue, the AIM-120C. These technologies have all been integrated on the lighter J-10 fighter airframe, leading to the elite J-10C’s entry into service in April 2018. A J-15 airframe fielding these same capabilities is likely to be complete by the time more capable carriers are fully assembled in the early 2020s.

A specialized electronic warfare variant of the J-15 is also confirmed to be under development to complement the capabilities of conventional variants. With these enhancements applied to the already formidable air superiority airframe, and with the fighter able to take off with a full payload using an electromagnetic launch system, the J-15 could well emerge as a world leading carrier-based fighter — one which will give more urgency to calls for the U.S. Navy to quickly acquire a new carrier-based air superiority fighter of its own.

Abraham Ait is a military analyst and expert on Asia-Pacific security. He is the founder of Military Watch Magazine.

Don’t Underestimate China’s Flying Shark
 

mtime7

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SU-35 was not a hoax deal, interest was shown and negotiations are going on, yes its true its not on top of list...
they would be a lot better off with the SU-35
 

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