UAE buy two spy satellites to Airbus and Thales

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For the safety of all GCC.

(*_-)






Pending spy satellite Gokturk-1 (Equivalent S. Korean Arirang-3 satellite or Pleiades satellite) our Turkish brothers.


France, UAE Close In on Spy Sat Deal

Sep. 1, 2014 - 01:54PM
By AWAD MUSTAFA and PIERRE TRAN


DUBAI AND PARIS —
The United Arab Emirates and France are expected to finalize the Falcon Eye spy satellites deal within the coming weeks while looking into the purchase of 40 Dassault Rafale fighter jets.

A UAE source close to the negotiations told Defense News that the discussions on the deal were completed and French Defense Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian is expected soon in the UAE.

“For the Falcon Eye deal to proceed there is a need for high level of technology transfer, and for that we have negotiated the possible purchase of 40 Rafale jets with the overhaul of the Mirage 2000 fleet,” the source said.

The contract for the UAE to purchase two high resolution Pleiades military observation satellites has faced resistance from Abu Dhabi. Under the US $930 million deal — signed July 22 last year by Sheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed al-Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and deputy supreme commander of the armed forces, and Le Drian — delivery was set for 2018, along with a ground station.

The deal is the first major contract between France and a Gulf Cooperation Council country concerning sensitive intelligence satellite technology.

The satellites are provided by prime contractor Airbus Defence and Space and payload-maker Thales Alenia Space, and as part of the deal, 20 engineers will be trained to use the new equipment.

The first signs of a problem appeared in January when a UAE source said the satellites contained two specific US-supplied components that provide a back door to the highly secure data transmitted to the ground station, meaning all data could be transmitted to a third, unauthorized party.

Since the announcement of the discovery, Le Drian has been shuttling between Paris and Abu Dhabi to seal the deal.

The source said in June that the UAE was insisting on technology transfer before restarting negotiations with France to purchase the satellites.

A further delay occurred in gaining authorization of export of sensitive US technology, which required resolving. When President François Hollande paid a state visit to America this year, he received an assurance from President Barack Obama the clearances would be given. But the contract deadline lapsed, and talks between Paris and Abu Dhabi restarted on the terms and conditions of the new deal.

The US has since granted an export license for the satellite components, which solved that issue.

Le Drian was expected to arrive before the end of August, the source said, but has been delayed due to “technical” issues. The French Embassy in Abu Dhabi, however, confirmed that Le Drian “will certainly come in the following weeks.”

French industry sources said there are high hopes for a new deal to be struck. “We’re on the right track,” said an Airbus Defence and Space spokesman. “The lights are green.”

Thales Alenia Space, a joint venture between Thales and Finmeccanica, declined comment because Airbus DS is the prime contractor.

“Everything is going well,” a French defense spokesman said. There is agreement on technology, economics and political issues, he said. “There are no problems. France is politically committed to reaching a conclusion on the contract,” he added.

“A new contract has been drawn up, all the companies must sign, and that signing is expected to take a couple of weeks,” an industry executive said. “The bottles of champagne have been put on ice for the celebrations.”

For two years, Le Drian has worked hard to renew close ties with the UAE — seen as a key regional player and a significant export prospect — as the beleaguered French industry needs foreign deals. France has sold little military equipment to the gulf nation since Abu Dhabi bought the Mirage 2000-9 fighter in the 1990s.

Defense News




Password Vimeo video : AdamaBattlestar


Surveillance Satellite Pleiades



See 00:22 to 01:31

Note : Pleiades surveillance satellite has very high 3D relief capacity, especially, perfect for our high increase targeting use cruise missile totally free (Storm Shadow / SCALP EG cruise missile or future SOM B2 Cruise Missile) [guidance systems IBN (Image Based Navigation), TRN (Terrain Referenced Navigation)]. Satellite’s imager can detect objects with ‘a diameter of 34 centimeters’ from its planned operating altitude.



Surveillance Satellite Pleiades Constellation




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Continue 2 :



ROKETSAN’s SOM to fly in Europe

ROKETSAN that produces products for Turkish Armed Forces has recently drawn attention of European companies with its Cirit and SOM missiles. The company has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Airbus Military and Defence in Berlin ILA Fair. Press release indicated that the MoU aims to find out probable areas of cooperation. It is however known that this cooperation aims installation of SOMs into Airbus Defence and Space’s Eurofighter Typhoon aircrafts. The cooperation will also serve to the integration of air combat systems, missile integration and Turkey’s indigenous fighter aircraft project. SOM is developped by TÜBİTAK SAGE and produced by ROKETSAN.

C4defence



Future SOM B2







TÜBİTAK SAGE NEB Bunker Buster






















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Scorpion

THINK TANK
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I have heard this deal was put off due to the UAE discovering some spy tech installed to it.
 
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I have heard this deal was put off due to the UAE discovering some spy tech installed to it.

:-E

No, is solved.


Need help ?

Link : Google Translate

Emirats Arabes Unis : la France va rapidement signer le contrat de deux satellites espions

Michel Cabirol | 14/02/2014, 16:40

Selon le PDG d'Airbus Defence & Space France, François Auque, "le contrat Falcon Eye sera mis en œuvre dans quelques jours".

Le dossier de la vente des deux satellites espions (Falcon Eye) aux Émirats Arabes Unis (EAU) est réglé depuis plusieurs semaines. Interrogée fin janvier, une source proche du dossier avait expliqué à "La Tribune" qu'il "n'y avait pas de problème spécifique" sur la vente de ces deux satellites aux Emirats Arabes Unis. Plus précisément les États-Unis, en dépit de la perte de ce marché par les industriels américains (Raytheon puis Lockheed Martin), estimaient de leur "intérêt" que la France soit sélectionnée plutôt qu'un autre pays, comme la Russie, voire la Chine. "C'est de la réalpolitik", avait alors conclu cette même source. Enfin, le dossier a été évoqué lors de la visite d'état de François Hollande aux États-Unis mais il était débloqué depuis quelques semaines.

De quoi parle-t-on au juste ? Washington, appliquant sa réglementation Itar (international traffic in arms regulations) a refusé, puis accepté l'exportation de certains composants sur les satellites Falcon Eye, avant de revenir en arrière puis de l'autoriser in extremis avant l'expiration fin janvier de la validité du contrat. Mais une clause inscrite dans le contrat prorogeait de deux mois sa validité en cas d'aléa. Ce qui a permis au PDG d'Airbus Defence & Space France (ADS), François Auque, lors du séminaire Perspectives spatiales organisé par le cabinet Euroconsult à Paris, jeudi 13 février; d'assurer que "le contrat Falcon Eye sera mis en œuvre dans quelques jours, ces licences ayant été obtenues".

Au Maroc, les États-Unis ont donné leur accord

Le journal "Le Monde" écrivait déjà le 29 janvier qu'au lendemain d'une visite de Jean-Yves Le Drian à Washington, une source ministérielle a déclaré le 27 janvier qu'une "solution technique" avait été trouvée, sans plus de détails.

Pour exemple, au Maroc, où la France a vendu deux satellites espions, les États-Unis ne se sont pas opposés à ce contrat mis en vigueur en 2013. Un contrat secret qui n'est pour le moment confirmé par aucun des groupes concernés (TAS et ADS).

La Tribune


There are no restrictions concerning the use of weapons (Totally free) from France or England.

Otherwise we would have rather chosen the American satellite ‘GeoEye-2’.


GeoEye-2 Entry Shakes Up U.A.E. Satellite Competition

by Warren Ferster — February 1, 2013


PARIS and WASHINGTON —
U.S. geospatial-information providers DigitalGlobe and GeoEye have thrown a curve ball into the long-running competition between U.S. and European hardware builders for a satellite contract with the United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.) by proposing to sell the U.A.E. the nearly completed GeoEye-2 satellite, industry officials said.

DigitalGlobe and GeoEye, whose merger cleared final U.S. government approval Jan. 31, would thereby be spared the expense of storing GeoEye-2 for three years while waiting for the orbiting WorldView-1 satellite to reach retirement.

Herndon, Va.-based GeoEye and Longmont, Colo.-based DigitalGlobe have said the merged company will operate a fleet of three satellites, fewer than the combined four or five satellites the two companies would operate if they remained in competition.

The U.A.E., led by its air force, has been talking for years about purchasing its own high-resolution optical satellite system instead of relying on images purchased from suppliers like GeoEye and DigitalGlobe in the United States, and Astrium Geo-Information Services in Europe.

U.S. and European bidders have admitted to being exasperated that the contest seems to be never-ending, but the prospect of a $1 billion sale is too enticing for them to stop sending teams to the U.A.E. to keep their bids active.

In September, a U.A.E. air force official said the competition was nearing completion and had been narrowed from an initial 11 bidders to finalists from Europe and the United States. According to industry officials, bidders on the program included a team of Astrium and Thales Alenia Space of Europe; Lockheed Martin Space Systems of Sunnyvale, Calif., builder of GeoEye-2; and a team of Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems of Aurora, Colo., and Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. of Boulder, Colo.

The two European companies also joined to build the French Pleiades satellites, which are dual-use assets whose imagery is available for commercial sale, with a portion of the image-taking ability reserved for the French Defense Ministry.

The United States and France, which along with Israel are the nations that have been most active in developing their own high-resolution optical satellite capabilities, have arrived separately at the same policy on imagery exports: A 50-centimeter ground-sampling distance, meaning objects of that size and larger can be distinguished, is allowable, while images sharper than 50 centimeters require special government approval.

U.S. manufacturers have been slow to seize export opportunities for Earth observation satellites, but Astrium and Thales Alenia Space have sold several spacecraft equipped with high-resolution imaging cameras, notably to Turkey, Kazakhstan and South Korea. None collects imagery at resolutions sharper than 50 centimeters.

It remains unclear what conditions, if any, the U.S. government — which has made it clear it supports U.S. industry involvement in the competition — has set on the U.A.E. sale, and specifically whether the camera U.A.E. planned for GeoEye-2 would be replaced by another, less-capable system to stay within the 50-centimeter limit. As designed, the satellite’s imager can detect objects with a diameter of 34 centimeters from its planned operating altitude.

The U.A.E. air force official said when the procurement process began nearly a decade ago, it was unclear whether a U.S. company would be allowed to bid. The easing of U.S. export restrictions since then has permitted the U.A.E. to benefit from a healthy trans-Atlantic competition.

GeoEye has estimated that the GeoEye-2 satellite will end up costing between $820 million and $850 million, including its launch and insurance. The company said that as of June 30 it had spent $718 million on the program. The satellite had been scheduled for a mid-2013 launch aboard a Lockheed Martin-supplied Atlas 5 rocket, and GeoEye had said it had until March to inform Lockheed Martin whether it would proceed with the launch.

With the merger with DigitalGlobe — which looks more like an acquisition by DigitalGlobe than a merger — now complete, GeoEye and DigitalGlobe are free to plan their combined orbital fleet and prepare for GeoEye-2’s storage.

Asked about the GeoEye-2 offer, one industry official said it appears to be outside the specifications set by U.A.E. officials for the competition. The official conceded it would not be the first time a customer changed specifications midway through a competitive bidding process.

In a statement to SpaceNews emailed Feb. 1, DigitalGlobe spokesman Robert Keosheyan said, “DigitalGlobe acknowledges receiving an unsolicited inbound expression of interest from the UAE and is in the process of considering whether to engage in discussions.”

Space News

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