Apache Helicopter, air-to-air 'Stinger Missile'... | World Defense

Apache Helicopter, air-to-air 'Stinger Missile'...

Joe Shearer

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Would this be useful?

"...the AH-64, which entered service as the AH-64A in 1986. Numerous planned upgrades to the “B” and “C” standard were planned during the 1990s but stalled because of budget reductions after the Cold War ended in 1991. These upgrades were incorporated in the 1997 AH-64D Block I. The AH-64D Longbow (because of the radar mast, making it possible to see ground targets and flying obstacles in all weather) models began appearing in 2002. Mass production of the latest version (the E model) and conversion D models to E began in late 2013. The U.S. Army began receiving AH-64Es in 2012.

AH-64Es have more powerful and fuel efficient engines, as well as much improved electronics. AH-64Es also have Internet- like capabilities enabling these gunships to quickly exchange images, video, and so on with other aircraft and ground troops. Each AH-64E can also control several UAVs and launch missiles at targets spotted by these UAVs. The AH-64E radar has longer range and onboard computers are much more powerful than earlier ones. The electronics are easier to upgrade and maintain. The combination of improved fire control and Internet capabilities greatly increases the combat effectiveness of the AH-64. The 10 ton AH-64E carries a pilot and a weapons officer, as well as up to 16 Hellfire missiles (plus the 30mm automatic cannon). Sorties average three hours. The AH-64 can operate at night and has a top speed of 260 kilometers an hour."

There's more, in case anyone's interested.
 

Khafee

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. AH-64Es also have Internet- like capabilities enabling these gunships to quickly exchange images, video, and so on with other aircraft and ground troops
Data Link

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The AH-64 can operate at night and has a top speed of 260 kilometers an hour."
It is limited to 260Kmph, due to the Longbow Mast mounted Radar.

Limited by It's mast mounted Millimeter Wave
.
There's more, in case anyone's interested.
Yes Please!


The reason I asked the OP for more details was because, as usual a new thread on a YT video, and thats it. The video doesn't give any details of when the test happened, or under what parameters.

My gut feeling is, with the AH1Z becoming operational, plus its advertising that it can carry Stingers, Boeing decided to add this capability as well. Although this, and the ablity to carry AGM-112 Anti-Radiation missile has long been there, it hasn't really been exercised by any operator, except on rare occasions, due to it's limited payload.
 

Joe Shearer

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It is limited to 260Kmph, due to the Longbow Mast mounted Radar.

Limited by It's mast mounted Millimeter Wave

Yes Please!


The reason I asked the OP for more details was because, as usual a new thread on a YT video, and thats it. The video doesn't give any details of when the test happened, or under what parameters.

My gut feeling is, with the AH1Z becoming operational, plus its advertising that it can carry Stingers, Boeing decided to add this capability as well. Although this, and the ablity to carry AGM-112 Anti-Radiation missile has long been there, it hasn't really been exercised by any operator, except on rare occasions, due to it's limited payload.
I will add whatever detail I can, in a few minutes. Meanwhile, your point makes for thoughtful reading. Does this mean that most users see an attack helicopter as a tactical weapon of opportunity? It flies in supporting fast-moving armour, and shoots at anything, particularly soft-skinned targets, that moves? Do battlefield commanders ever think of it as a pioneer, clearing out fire-detecting radar from the other side, closing out the counter-battery options, and enabling the armoured component to charge faster, harder? It seems that a little doctrine-building is in order, and thinking of these helicopters as fast, quick immediate reaction weapons actually is just a Band-Aid on operations plans. If something goes wrong, let the attack helicopters fix it, rather than, before anything goes wrong, let's streamline our attack and kill the enemy infrastructure before we attack the enemy firepower before we attack the enemy soldiery.

Just wondering.

An answer might lie in the possibility that since attack helicopters may not have been used in combined arms attacks extensively, their use as a weapons type to be planned out in advance as well as in contingency planning may not have happened. However, I would be surprised to know, in these days of micro-management, that such a possibility actually existed.
 

Khafee

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I will add whatever detail I can, in a few minutes. Meanwhile, your point makes for thoughtful reading. Does this mean that most users see an attack helicopter as a tactical weapon of opportunity? It flies in supporting fast-moving armour, and shoots at anything, particularly soft-skinned targets, that moves? Do battlefield commanders ever think of it as a pioneer, clearing out fire-detecting radar from the other side, closing out the counter-battery options, and enabling the armoured component to charge faster, harder? It seems that a little doctrine-building is in order, and thinking of these helicopters as fast, quick immediate reaction weapons actually is just a Band-Aid on operations plans. If something goes wrong, let the attack helicopters fix it, rather than, before anything goes wrong, let's streamline our attack and kill the enemy infrastructure before we attack the enemy firepower before we attack the enemy soldiery.

Just wondering.

An answer might lie in the possibility that since attack helicopters may not have been used in combined arms attacks extensively, their use as a weapons type to be planned out in advance as well as in contingency planning may not have happened. However, I would be surprised to know, in these days of micro-management, that such a possibility actually existed.
The small arms ballistic protection provided, is only surpassed by the A10.

In terms of it moving head first, and clearing a path for the armour, problem is that it is still vulnerable toMANPADS, and to a very less extent RPG fire as well. Nonetheless, the Hydra 70's 10km range and Hellfire Missile's 8km range has has proven itself invaluable in Gulf War 1&2, as well as Yemen. Although, as far as I know, in all three conflicts, the Apache did not carry any A2A missiles.

Btw, readers might be interested in knowing, that it shares the same engines as the Black Hawk GE-T700. Besides that, with its cutting edge sensors, low RCS, it is an invaluable Recon platform as well. It was also the first helo to have the weapons system slaved to the pilot/ WSO's helmet.
 

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