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Zaslon

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@Lieutenant we never agreed to give any country transfer of technology or local production the S-400, S-400 is our most high end SAM system currently in service until the S-500 enters.

The country you maybe thinking of wanting license production was India, and they orginially wanted 12 batteries, which would be 96 launchers, and we would build the first 12 and the last 84 would be built in India. thing was though, India didn't want export missiles for the system, they want the same missiles we use for our forces, which included the 40N6 and 9M96, but we declined that proposal and they got the export systems.

China never thought about production on the S-400 system since they only wanted 48 launchers, which would of made no sense for them to even obtain a manufacturing license, and they are also fixing more of their SAM systems.
 

Lieutenant

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@Lieutenant we never agreed to give any country transfer of technology or local production the S-400, S-400 is our most high end SAM system currently in service until the S-500 enters.

The country you maybe thinking of wanting license production was India, and they orginially wanted 12 batteries, which would be 96 launchers, and we would build the first 12 and the last 84 would be built in India. thing was though, India didn't want export missiles for the system, they want the same missiles we use for our forces, which included the 40N6 and 9M96, but we declined that proposal and they got the export systems.

China never thought about production on the S-400 system since they only wanted 48 launchers, which would of made no sense for them to even obtain a manufacturing license, and they are also fixing more of their SAM systems.
What about Turkey and I think the Saudis at least demanding for partial tot? Will Russia be willing to do it?
 

Zaslon

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What about Turkey and I think the Saudis at least demanding for partial tot? Will Russia be willing to do it?
Saudi's I believe are mostly after a logistical hub, an MRO plant
Turkey on the other is only changing theirs to their own Aselsan IFF codes (through an agreement)

but what many are not seeing through closed doors, is India has sold some Russian tech they locally built and sold to foreign countries, that's why we are not selling them as much as before, because we can't trust them. I also heard the US & NATO countries are now running into the same problem.
 

Zhengzhou

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how many Russo-Sino arms deals in the makings?
24 more Su-35s are in talks
2-4 more S-400 batteries in discussion
talks for Karakurt missile boats, local production in talks
Kalina class subs, ~10-12 in talks
and a JV heavy lift helo for the military
all that I can think of bro...
 

Zhengzhou

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@Lieutenant we never agreed to give any country transfer of technology or local production the S-400, S-400 is our most high end SAM system currently in service until the S-500 enters.

The country you maybe thinking of wanting license production was India, and they orginially wanted 12 batteries, which would be 96 launchers, and we would build the first 12 and the last 84 would be built in India. thing was though, India didn't want export missiles for the system, they want the same missiles we use for our forces, which included the 40N6 and 9M96, but we declined that proposal and they got the export systems.

China never thought about production on the S-400 system since they only wanted 48 launchers, which would of made no sense for them to even obtain a manufacturing license, and they are also fixing more of their SAM systems.
India also reduced it's S-400 order drastically as well, it went for 96 launchers down to 30.
 

Khafee

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China's First Helicopter Ship

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It is believed China’s first batch of Type 075 craft will consist of three ships. The Type 075 will be the world’s third largest amphibious assault ship, behind only the US Wasp-class (41,000 tonnes) and America-class (45,000 tonnes). It is significantly bigger than Japan’s Izumo-class (26,000 tonnes), and France’s Mistral-class (21,000 tonnes).

The Type 075 will be able to carry up to 30 helicopters, as well as a number of amphibious tanks, armoured vehicles, jet boats, and hundreds of marine troops.

Its massive flat deck could also accommodate vertical take-off and landing fighters such as the F-35B. This capability would enable the ship to operate as a light aircraft carrier, in a similar function to the way the US military uses LHDs. However, China currently does not yet have any vertical take-off jets.

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Khafee

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China launches first domestically developed amphibious assault ship

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China's first domestically developed and constructed Type 075 amphibious assault ship is launched in Shanghai on Wednesday. Photo by Li Tang/Ministry of National Defense of the People's Republic of China


Sept. 26 (UPI) -- China has launched its first Type 075 landing helicopter dock amphibious assault ship on Wednesday at a shipyard in Shanghai.

This latest inclusion of the new Type 075 adds to China's People's Liberation Army Navy's military presence, which includes 106 naval missile platforms in the Western Pacific.

While the official launch of the vessel does not mean it is operational, experts suspect the rollout of this Type 075 is part of China's plan to expand its presence in the Asia-Pacific region.

The flat-top vessel stretches about 820 feet long with a roughly 98 feet beam, which can accommodate at least 30 armed helicopters and four helicopter elevators on deck. The ship will also support fast boats for troop deployment and stronger attack capabilities.

In all, the ship will displace more than 30,000 tons.

These types of ships normally serve as small aircraft carriers used during assaults on islands and coastal areas, experts say.

"It highlights China's growing maritime power projection and the expansion of its amphibious warfare ambitions and forces," Carl Schuster, a former United States Navy captain and Hawaii Pacific University instructor, told CNN.

Now, the ship needs to be equipped with crew quarters, navigation, radar and electronic warfare systems before it can conduct sea trials.

According to a U.S. Defense Department report, the Chinese navy already has a fleet of eight smaller Type 071 amphibious transport docks, which can hold four helicopters each.

Shuster said China will likely build two more Type 075 amphibious assault ships.
 

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Here Is China's Plan for a Nuclear War Against America
Take a look.
by Lyle J. Goldstein
September 29, 2019

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Key Point: Chinese strategists seem to be increasingly practiced (at least in a domestic context) at selling the argument that more and new types of weapons enhance deterrence and thus strategic stability.

When one reads enough Chinese naval literature, diagrams of multi-axial cruise missile saturation attacks against aircraft carrier groups may begin to seem normal. However, one particular graphic from the October 2015 issue (p. 32) of the naval journal Naval & Merchant Ships [舰船知识] stands out as both unusual and singularly disturbing. It purports to map the impact of a Chinese intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) strike by twenty nuclear-armed rockets against the United States.

Targets include the biggest cities on the East and West Coasts, as well as in the Midwest, as one would expect. Giant radiation plumes cover much of the country and the estimate in the caption holds that the strike “would yield perhaps 50 million people killed” [可能造成5000 万死亡]. The map below that graphic on the same page illustrates the optimal aim point for a hit on New York City with a “blast wave” [火风量] that vaporizes all of Manhattan and well beyond.

That makes the North Korean “threat” look fairly insignificant by comparison, doesn’t it? But what’s really disturbing is that the scenario described above envisions a strike by China’s largely antiquated DF-5 first generation ICBM. In other words, the illustration is perhaps a decade or more out of date. As China has deployed first the road-mobile DF-31, then DF-31A and now JL-2 (a submarine-launched nuclear weapon), China’s nuclear strategy has moved from “assured retaliation” to what one may term “completely assured retaliation.”

Indeed, the actual theme of the article featuring those graphics concerns recent reports regarding testing of the DF-41 mobile ICBM. The author of that article, who is careful to note that his views do not represent those of the publication, observes that when a Chinese Defense Ministry spokesperson was queried about the test on August 6, 2015, the spokesperson “did not deny that the DF-41 exists” [并没有否认‘东风’41 的存在]. The author also cites U.S. intelligence reports, concluding that four tests have now been conducted, including one that demonstrates multiple-reentry vehicle (MIRV) technology. The author estimates that DF-41 will finally provide China with the capability to launch missiles from north central China and hit all targets in the U.S. (except Florida). With the goal of better understanding the rapidly evolving strategic nuclear balance between China and the U.S. and its significance, this Dragon Eye surveys some recent Mandarin-language writings on the subject of Chinese nuclear forces.

To be sure, a flurry of Chinese writings on the nuclear balance did follow after the September parade in Beijing that highlighted Chinese missile forces. Perhaps the most remarkable revelation from the parade was the unveiling of the DF-26, a new, longer-range anti-ship ballistic missile (ASBM), based on the revolutionary shorter-ranged cousin, the DF-21D ASBM. In fact, the November 2015 issue of the aforementioned journal ran a series of articles on the DF-26. In those articles, the weapon is described multiple times as a “nuclear conventional dual-purpose” [核常兼备] weapon. The major thrust of the article in that issue on the impact of the DF-26 on nuclear strategy seems to be to try to debunk the argument that China’s deployment of this new type of missile is “destabilizing.” Like their American counterparts, Chinese strategists seem to be increasingly practiced (at least in a domestic context) at selling the argument that more and new types of weapons enhance deterrence and thus strategic stability.

Despite the developments related above, the balance of opinion in Beijing seems impressively moderate on the prospects for a major nuclear buildup by China. In the allegedly nationalist forum of Global Times [环球时报], one commentator from the China Institute for International Studies (associated with the Foreign Ministry), for example, offered a few illuminating comments about a year ago in an expert forum entitled “How Many Nuclear Warheads Are Enough for China?” He is evidently concerned that “We have heard some new voices calling to ‘build a nuclear force appropriate for a great power.’” Instead, he argues that China must continue to focus on building a “small, elite and effective nuclear forces” [精干有效的核力量]. Likewise, a former vice-director of the Chinese Navy Nuclear Security Bureau offers that China is a medium-sized nuclear power, which should learn from the experience of Britain and France and deploy no fewer than four submarines carrying nuclear weapons (SSBNs)—far fewer than operated by either Russia or the United States.

Yet one can still find in that same analysis ample concern among Chinese specialists regarding new directions in U.S. military capabilities that could threaten China’s deterrent. Another concern amply evident in Chinese writings concerns tactical nuclear weaponry. Most of this reporting of late concerns a recent upgrade to the American B-61 nuclear bomb. A full-page graphic in the same issue that discusses the DF-41 missile tests offers many specifics on the B-61, including its “dial-a-yield” [威力可调技术] feature that enables the operator to choose destruction on a scale ranging from fifty to 0.3 kilotons. That same month, in the magazine Aerospace Knowledge [航空知识], a “centerfold” featured the SS-26 Iskander, a Russian short-range tactical nuclear weapon. Elsewhere, I have, moreover, documented Chinese discussions of tactical nuclear weapons for anti-submarine warfare, as well as the importance of nuclear-tipped submarine-launched cruise missile (SLCMs) for strategy in the late Cold War. Let’s hope that these are just academic discussions in the Chinese context and do not reflect actual weapons under development.

As one can see from this discussion, there is ample reason for anxiety with many new Chinese nuclear systems now coming online, as well as substantial reason for optimism. As an author who frequently rides China’s high-speed rail [高铁], I am acutely aware that astronomical sums of money spent on that system could just as easily have been spent building an enormous arsenal of nuclear weaponry. That was not done and it’s certainly good that Chinese leaders have their priorities straight. American strategists need to keep this Chinese restraint in mind, especially as they weigh both new, expensive weapons systems (missile defense augmentation, the new strategic bomber, SSBN-X and also prompt global strike) and a set of measures to counter Beijing within the maritime disputes on its flanks.
 

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China unveils drones, missiles and hypersonic glide vehicle at military parade
01 Oct 2019

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MELBOURNE, Australia — China has showcased new types of missiles and unmanned platforms for the first time at a military parade in its capital on Oct. 1 to mark the 70th anniversary of its founding.

The unmanned technologies included a large unmanned underwater vehicle, along with a high-speed unmanned aircraft believed to be capable of supersonic flight.

However, it was the missiles that took center stage — unsurprisingly given that the People’s Liberation Army Rocket Force, or PLARF, will be a central player in any future conflict involving China.

As previously reported by Defense News, the road-mobile DF-41 intercontinental ballistic missile and the JL-2 submarine-launched ballistic missile each made their debut at the parade in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, representing the survivability of China’s nuclear deterrence.

China’s state-run news agency Xinhua said the 16 DF-41 transporter-erector-launchers at the parade came from two PLARF brigades, while the 12 JL-2 truck-mounted canisters at the parade represented the striking power of each of China’s projected force of six Jin-class ballistic missile submarines.

The biggest surprise at the parade was the appearance of the DF-17 hypersonic glide vehicle, or HGV. The DF-17 consists of a standard ballistic missile booster for its first stage. The second stage is a low-flying projectile used to attack a target following the first stage’s ballistic reentry.

Reports citing U.S. government sources have said China has carried out several tests of HGVs, including the DF-17, since 2014. The DF-17 is the first system of its type known to be operational in the world, although several other nations including the U.S. are developing similar systems.

Also making their respective debuts at the parade were a pair of Chinese unmanned aircraft systems. The first of these was the Sharp Sword low-observable combat UAV. The example displayed at the parade featured a new stealthy engine intake and engine nozzles, in contrast to earlier photos showing a more conventional and less stealthy equivalents.


The other drone making its debut is believed to be a high-speed platform. Believed to be capable of attaining supersonic flight, the type, which has been referred to as the WZ-8, reportedly made its first flight in 2015 and is suspected in some quarters to be capable of launching from another aircraft such as the Xi’an H-6N bomber.

Photos from the parade confirm that this UAS is powered by a pair of rockets instead of an air-breathing engine, and suggests that speed is the priority for the design, possibly for reconnaissance missions or for attacking a high-value target.

The parade also saw the debut of the HSU001 large unmanned underwater vehicle, with two systems mounted on trailers. Each vehicle is powered by two propellers and appear to be able to mount a variety of payloads including mast-mounted optics, although little else is known.
 

Khafee

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'Stealth' Drones and More: 6 Crazy New Weapons China Just Displayed
October 1, 2019
Hypersonic missiles, drone submarines and much more.
by Sebastien Roblin

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On October 1, 2019 the People’s Republic of China’s celebrated the seventieth anniversary of its official founding after Mao Zedong consolidated the Chinese Communist Party’s control over mainland China.

For the occasion, Beijing paraded cutting-edge military systems on Tiananmen Square deemed ready to unveil before audiences both domestic and international.

Formerly reliant on reverse-engineered Soviet weapons from the 1950s, China has leveraged forty years of sustained economic growth to not only develop new tanks, jet fighters and aircraft carriers, but has invested heavily in combat drones, stealth technology, and long-range guided missiles.

By-now familiar weapons on display included Wing Loong-II combat drones used extensively in combat in Libya, the Type 15 light tank intended for operations on the Tibetan Plateau, and DF-26 missiles with enough range to strike Guam and guidance systems designed to enable targeting of moving aircraft carriers.

But the parade also showcased several advanced new weapons, including several types which so far have no equivalent in service elsewhere on the planet. Let’s look at six systems in particular that received the red carpet treatment in the recent parade.

DF-17 Hypersonic Missiles:
The long, weirdly flat-looking missiles mounted on trucks are DF-17 ballistic missiles designed to deploy a triangular DF-Z hypersonic glide vehicle. Hypersonic weapons travel five to ten times the speed of sound—that equates to one to two miles per second—but unlike similarly speedy long-range ballistic missiles, do so on a much flatter trajectory which makes them harder to detect and intercepts—leaving enemies with only a few minutes to react.

Moreover, unlike older ballistic missiles, hypersonic glide vehicles are maneuverable, meaning they could potentially evade anti-ballistic missile interceptors like the THAADs and SM-3s used to protect U.S. ships and bases in East Asia.

The DF-17 missile is estimated to have a range of around 1,200 miles and its re-entry vehicle, which can carry both conventional or nuclear warheads, can supposedly be re-targeted mid-flight.

HSU-001 Drone Submarine:
China is also the first country to openly deploy a large-displacement unmanned underwater vehicle (LDUUV)—basically a fully-robotic submarine capable of long-range missions.

Naval warfare theorist expect that unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs) will eventually serve alongside manned submarines in undersea warfare. But so far only small, short-range UUVs have seen much use, particularly to recover objects form the sea floor.

Because it’s difficult to maintain a drone command link to an undersea vehicle, a large, long-range UUV (LDUUV) would have to be fully autonomous—that is, capable of carrying out its mission without any human input.

China’s LDUUV design doesn’t appear to have any torpedo tubes and is therefore presumably an underwater surveillance platform. Two sensor masts are visible, as well as likely a large sonar aperture behind its flat nose. The HSU-001 could prove highly useful for long-endurance missions monitoring the movements of U.S. Navy submarines and surface warships—data which could be periodically transmitted back to the mainland via satellite antenna while near the surface.

DR-8 Spy Drone
The DR-8 is a blade-like supersonic spy drone designed to soar over the Pacific ocean at speeds ranging between three and five times the speed of sound using a mysterious propulsion system.

As discussed in this earlier piece by David Axe, the DR-8 appears may have been influenced by the American high-speed D-21 spy drone, several of which were recovered after unsuccessful spy missions.

According to the South China Morning Post, the DR-8 is intended to provide post-strike damage-assessment of attacks by truck-borne DF-21D and DF-26B ‘carrier killing’ missiles, which can theoretically strike moving ships from over one or two thousand miles away from the Chinese mainland.

“Sharp Sword” Stealth Combat Drone
Beijing also revealed its manta-shaped Hongdu GJ-11 Lijian (“Sharp Sword”) stealth Unmanned Combat Air Vehicles (UCAV). These would not only be difficult to detect with radar but can also carry over two tons of laser-guided bombs or missiles in two internal weapons bays.

One of a half-dozen designs spawned from the AVIC 601-S stealth drone research program, Sharp Sword made its first flight in 2013—making it the first stealth UCAV to have been developed by a non-NATO country, though in 2018 Russia showcased its own stealth UCAV.

A reconnaissance variant of the GJ-11 will reportedly debut in service on Chinese Type 001A aircraft carriers, used for surveillance and reconnaissance missions and gathering targeting data for missile strikes. However, its weapon could allow it to be used for penetrating strikes against heavily defended targets.

H-6N Long-Range Bomber
The PLA Air Force and Navy both operate the H-6 long-range strategic jet bomber, a domestic copy of the Soviet Tu-16 ‘Badger’. Like the U.S. B-52, the H-6 can’t go anywhere near enemy fighters or air-defense missiles but can safely truck along very long-range missiles.

Photos of the new H-6N model reveal two key characteristics. First, it has an in-flight refueling probe which should extend the bomber’s range to 3,700 miles.

Second, the H-6N’s fuselage appears to have a cavity that would allow it to carry a huge air-launched ballistic missile adapted from the ground-launched DF-21 ballistic missile.

While early H-6s carried nuclear gravity bombs, China does not currently maintain any air-deployed nuclear weapons. If H-6Ns are able to carry nuclear-capable ballistic missiles, however, Beijing did not see fit to reveal that in its 2019 parade.

Hunting Eagle Gyrocopters
One of the more bizarre items trucked along in the parade were two-seat Shaanxi Baoji ‘Hunting Eagle’ gyrocopters.

Gyrocopters, or auto-gyros, resemble helicopters, but their top rotors are unpowered. Instead, a horizontal “pusher” engine propels them forward, generating airflow which automatically turns the top rotor for an upwards lift. Gyrocopters are lighter, smaller and cheaper than helicopters and can land in tighter spaces—but they’re also slower, cannot take off vertically and require skill to pilot safely. You can see a Hunting Eagle in flight here.

Why is the PLA showcasing something usually considered a light recreational vehicle? According to Kyle Mizokami at Popular Mechanics, the Hunting Eagle will be used for “search and rescue, border control, reconnaissance, anti-riot, and other roles. It will also be used to self-deploy Chinese special forces on missions into enemy territory.”

A caveat, however, is that the Hunting Eagle, which also comes in a three-seat version, would be constrained by short range.
So China’s gyrocopter-riding commandoes may not constitute a world-ending superweapon, but they are kind of neat.
 

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