Eurosatory 2016 | World Defense

Eurosatory 2016

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REGIONAL FOCUS - Middle East and Africa [ES2016D1]

13 June 2016
http://www.janes.com/article/61175/regional-focus-middle-east-and-africa-es2016d1

The Saudi-led intervention in Yemen and the rise of Iran in the wake of its nuclear deal appear to have set the stage for a further escalation in the region’s Shia- Sunni rivalry. Meanwhile, Russia has re-established itself as a major player in the Middle East with its military deployment to Syria.

Some of the key events in the Middle East have been predictable: the nuclear deal finalised with Iran in July 2015 had been expected since mid- 2014, while the modest gains made against the Islamic State were only too foreseeable. The US strategy of trying to create new groups to fight the Islamic State in Syria proved predictably flawed and was abandoned.

Others developments, however, have proved surprising.

A major military operation by an Arab coalition led by Saudi Arabia would have been difficult to imagine in 2014.

Russia’s initially unannounced deployment of a significant force to Syria also appeared to come from nowhere.

Wherever they operate in the Middle East, militaries struggle against agile and determined opponents increasingly armed with anti-tank missiles and high-definition video cameras.

Rebels have torn Syrian tanks apart with TOW missiles, while Yemeni fighters have knocked out numerous Saudi tanks and, on at least one occasion, hit the armoured recovery vehicle sent to rescue crippled vehicles. Several Egyptian M60 MBTs and even a patrol boat met a similar fate at the sharp end of Russia’s increasingly popular Kornet missile wielded by the Sinai branch of the Islamic State.

In defence, modern asymmetric operators sow fields of landmines and booby traps, making any advance painfully slow. They also appear adept at evading the sensors arrayed against them. Yemeni fighters can seemingly raid Saudi border positions without their approach being spotted, while the Islamic State launched a surprise attack in May 2015 using about 30 suicide vehicle bombs to break the will of Al-Ramadi’s defenders.

As a consequence, decisive battlefield victories are rare.

REGIONAL LAND VEHICLE FORECASTS (2016-2024)
End user countries Saudi Arabia’s negative –6% CAGR and USD31.7 billion market value leads the region with procurement of the Piranha LAV (USD20 billion). Procuring a new MBT for approximately USD3.4 billion potentially met with the Leopard 2A7 MBTs continues, along with Saudi Arabia’s plan to acquire 950 BMP-3s from Russia and 500 from Iraq. Saudi Arabia, like many users in the Middle East, is highly unpredictable in its spending and requirements.

The country does not follow a clear cycle of procurement-upgrade- replacement, instead being heavily led by the proactive efforts of defence suppliers and current trends within the market.

MAJOR DEFENCE MARKETS
Saudi Arabia

With a defence budget estimated at USD46.3 billion in 2015, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia continues to be the leading military power in the Gulf and one of the largest arms importers in the world.

Operating in a challenging security environment, Saudi Arabia is investing in capability modernisation to back an increasingly assertive foreign policy to meet regional security challenges. These range from the perceived Iranian threat; a fear of encirclement by a ‘Shia arc’ of pro-Iranian regimes stretching from Syria to Lebanon; and overspill from instability in neighbouring countries such as Iraq, Syria and Yemen. The Kingdom also faces internal security fears and the threat of domestic terrorism. As a result, the air force and national guard have seen significant investment.

Saudi Arabia’s ability to fund the modernisation and equipment of its armed forces is underpinned by the global demand for hydrocarbons. The slump in world oil prices in 2014 saw defence expenditure decline slightly in the short term, and undergo some delay in growth, but IHS forecasts a return to growth from 2017 onwards.

Defence and security investment has – in line with overall government spending – increased in all but two of the past 18 years, growing by an average of 19% a year between 2012 and 2014.

The Kingdom’s oil wealth enables substantial military spending. While this leaves it vulnerable to changes in global oil demand and prices, foreign reserves are substantial, standing at around USD700 billion as of 2015.

Saudi Arabia ranks as one of the world’s largest importers of defence materiel. Despite wider international interest in Saudi procurement aspirations, the dominant position held by the US has been reinforced with a series of major orders.

Although the position of the UK in the market is noteworthy and emerging participants – ranging from Russia, China and South Korea to the Czech Republic – will maintain an interest and no doubt win some business, the US is almost certain to remain Saudi Arabia’s key security partner.

Saudi Arabia’s huge investment in defence equipment is designed in part to boost its economic diversification away from hydrocarbons. Despite significant investment by foreign firms in Saudi Arabia’s defence industrial capability through the Kingdom’s offset programme, progress has not been as great as was once hoped.

Defence spending
Saudi Arabia had an estimated defence budget of USD46.28 billion in 2015, making it the biggest military spender in the Middle East by some margin.

Military investment is expected to retain its position in terms of GDP proportion at around 5-6%, but will experience a decline and stagnation in the years ahead as the country deals with reduced oil revenues.

Official defence-related expenditure is outlined (with very limited detail) in the Kingdom’s annual defence and security budget, details of which are released each year by the Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency.

The defence and security budget encompasses non-military state security organs including those under the authority of the Ministry of the Interior but excludes ad hoc discretionary spending, which can be substantial.

Defence and security spending was approved at USD81.9 billion for 2015. However, the budget is thought to have received an unquantified downward revision during the course of the financial year as a result of weak energy prices.

IHS Jane’s estimates that core military expenditure accounts for around 60% of the defence and security budget.

To achieve its ongoing force modernisation goals, IHS Jane’s forecasts that Saudi Arabia will spend a total of USD34 billion on procurement in the years from 2016 to 2020. This reflects the delivery of weapon systems – worth USD60 billion – under the 2010 framework agreement with the US and the Kingdom’s ongoing procurement links with other major powers in Europe and Asia.

Land sector indigenous industry
Most of the Kingdom’s capabilities in terms of both design/development work and assembly appear to centre on ground vehicles. Saudi Arabia has facilities for the overhaul and modernisation of the M113 series of armoured fighting vehicles (AFVs). Heavier AFVs, such as the M1A1 MBT, were to be upgraded to a common standard with much of this work to be carried out in the Kingdom.

IHS Jane’s reported in 2009 that Saudi Arabia had begun marketing two of its latest 4x4 light armoured vehicles, Al Shibl 1 and Al Shibl 2 (Lion Cub) to potential Middle Eastern customers (a transfer to Yemen was reported in 2010 but remains unconfirmed).

The vehicles are designed and built by the Armoured Vehicles & Heavy Equipment Factory (AVF) – one of the country’s Military Industries Corporation companies – and are already operational with the Saudi Ministry of Defence.

The company has also overhauled and upgraded a number of Saudi Arabia’s Panhard General Defense AML 60 (armed with a 60mm mortar) and AML 90 (armed with a 90mm gun) armoured cars as well as the M3 Armoured Personnel Carrier (APC) variant.

AVF has also developed an up-armouring package for the US-built AM General High- Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) and a number of specialised vehicles based on a Toyota Land Cruiser chassis.

In 2011, Saudi Groups unveiled an indigenous wheeled APC, the Masmak, which is also to be launched for export in Africa in co-operation with South Africa’s Industrial and Automotive Design (IAD). It was to be marketed in Africa as the Nyoka Mk 2. No known sales have taken place.

Saudi Arabia, in conjunction with FNSS Savunma Sistemleri (a joint venture between BAE Systems and Turkey’s Nurol) is undertaking the modernisation of Saudi M113 armoured personnel vehicles at the Saudi Arabian Ground Forces High Command’s Al-Kharj Maintenance and Modernization facilities in Al Kharj. The programme sees work undertaken in Saudi Arabia using kits from FNSS, with more than 1,000 vehicles returned to service since the programme began in 2004 out of a planned 2,000.

United Arab Emirates
The United Arab Emirates (UAE) has invested significant sums in defence modernisation in recent years in order to meet pressing social, economic and strategic challenges. Military procurement is facilitated by the federation’s petrochemical-derived wealth.

The national offset programme has been refined since 2010 with a view to maximising benefits for the UAE through defence purchases, with an emphasis on local employment and training, and the diversification of the economy away from hydrocarbons. To this end, the UAE has created a nascent defence industry, achieved some export success, and formed defence industrial and military trade ties with regional allies.

However, the UAE has historically been a challenging defence market. Those active in the region face issues ranging from a slow-moving bureaucracy to extensive procurement-related demands on contractors.

The country’s participation in military operations – notably expeditionary operations in Yemen – are likely to drive a re-examination of military capabilities and requirements, as well as increase operations and maintenance expenditure in the short term.

The UAE’s steadily deepening defence ties with its near neighbours are also worthy of note; co-operation between the Gulf Co-operation Council (GCC) states is broadening further in the defence realm.

There are reasons to expect the UAE to emerge as a major hub in a regional defence industrial complex, underlining its significance both as a market and springboard for wider regional sales. The UAE’s export profile has also grown, with an agreement to sell NIMR armoured vehicles to Algeria (2012) a notable example.

There are reasons to approach defence trade with the UAE with a degree of caution. As a market it lacks transparency, and the offset and industrial participation reforms of 2010 provided – initially at least – reasons for disquiet.

The UAE’s defence industrial ambitions also suggest that partnerships and technology transfers aimed at achieving sales in the short term may carry the risk of creating a future industrial competitor in regional and global markets in the longer term.

Defence spending
IHS Jane’s forecasts that the UAE will increase (constant USD 2016) defence spending between 2016 and 2020 from USD19.1 billion to USD22.1 billion. This marks the reversal of a period of real decline, however, with military investment having dipped from USD16.2 billion in 2013.

The UAE, which is already considered to possess one of the best-equipped militaries within the region and the GCC, is expected to continue prioritising spending on procurement activities. Procurement accounts for around 20% of the overall defence budget.

Procurement spending in 2016 stood at an estimated USD3.1 billion – a steep decline on 2014’s USD4.4 billion.

However, IHS Jane’s forecasts procurement spending will steadily increase to USD3.8 billion by 2020.

Land sector indigenous industry
The UAE possesses a range of defence industrial capabilities in the land domain, although these are largely limited to tactical vehicles and small arms. NIMR Automotive, a joint venture of Tawazun and the Bin Jabr Group, is the principal land vehicle producer, building a range of wheeled 4x4 and 6x6 armoured and unarmoured utility and patrol vehicles. Al Taif and Vallo, meanwhile, provide maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) for the UAE’s heavy armour and land equipment.

The country is well supplied in small arms and munitions capabilities, with Caracal and Tawazun Advanced Defense Systems both producing a range of small arms (the companies were merged under the Caracal brand in 2013), while Caracal Light Ammunition and Burkan Munitions Systems manufacture a range of land, naval and air munitions. The establishment of joint ventures with Orbital ATK and other ammunition manufacturers in 2015 also holds promise for expanding the country’s ammunition manufacturing capabilities.

Foreign light armoured vehicle manufacturers such as Streit Group and IAG have also established manufacturing facilities in the country in order to place themselves closer to markets.

South Africa
South Africa is the most developed country on the African continent and dominates the economic, diplomatic and strategic environment of southern Africa. The South African National Defence Force (SANDF) is the most capable ground force in sub-Saharan Africa. It had (and to an extent still has) a formidable base of operational experience, but major funding challenges mean the SANDF currently faces a crisis in equipment and capability.

Low spending notwithstanding, a degree of clarity came to the South African defence sector in March 2014 with the long-awaited cabinet approval of the Defence Review; the first such document for 16 years. The document – which began with the premise that the SANDF had been in decline – outlined broad goals for the recapitalisation and repurposing of the force; the security environment in which South Africa exists; and the objectives of the national defence industry. The review was a roadmap which outlined general strategy; progress will depend entirely on implementation. The review received official approval in mid-2015.

Poverty eradication and job creation remain key challenges for the government, although tackling these issues has been made more difficult by the global economic downturn.

Delivery of public services such as water, electricity and housing are other issues that have fuelled recurring, often violent, demonstrations against local government in recent years.

In an effort to reduce high unemployment and improve the capacity of domestic industry, South Africa operates a wide-ranging industrial participation policy applicable to all government procurements, including defence.

This policy is partly intended to stimulate South Africa’s defence industry and maintain self-sufficiency in some key technology areas, while also increasing defence exports overseas.

Defence spending
The defence budget for 2015‑16 increased by a nominal 4% to ZAR44.6 billion (USD3.19 billion) in an effort to address some of the major capability deficiencies that have emerged following two decades of chronic underfunding and operational overstretch.

This relatively minor increase was effectively cancelled out by inflation (at 5%), meaning that funding effectively dropped by 1% year on year. The Medium- Term Economic Framework (MTEF) gives some more positive spending projections, particularly covering air force procurement in 2017.

Land sector indigenous industry
South Africa has considerable experience and capability in land systems. Through companies such as Paramount, state-owned Denel, and OTT Technologies it is capable of producing protected vehicles, artillery and turrets for both domestic use and export customers. South Africa also produces its own ammunition and ordnance. Denel Integrated Systems Solutions (DISS) provides a system-integration capability for air defence.

Some consolidation of the country’s land vehicle industry took place in 2014 and 2015, with Paramount acquiring a former DCD Protected Mobility industrial facility, and BAE Systems selling its South African land systems division to Denel.

Information from IHS Jane’s Markets Forecast, Defence Budgets and Navigating the Emerging Markets

(2476 words)
http://www.janes.com/article/61175/regional-focus-middle-east-and-africa-es2016d1
 

BLACKEAGLE

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Eurosatory 2016: IVECO launches Centauro II tank destroyer
Nicholas de Larrinaga, Paris - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly
17 June 2016

CIO unveiled its new Centauro II tank destroyer at Eurosatory 2016. Source: IHS/Nick de Larrinaga
CIO unveiled its new Centauro II 8x8 tank destroyer armed with a 120 mm main gun at Eurosatory 2016 in Paris.

The new vehicle has been designed for the Italian Army, which is planning to buy 136 examples to equip nine cavalry units.

Speaking at Eurosatory on 14 June, Roberto Cortesi, the president of CIO, said that the new vehicle offered improved mobility, improved protection, networking and firepower over its predecessor, the 30-year-old Centauro.

Centauro II is designed for aggressive reconnaissance in force, with its mobility allowing it to rapidly deploy/evade, and its firepower allowing for the engagement of any enemy at maximum ranges.

The CIO consortium comprises IVECO and Oto Melara (now Leonardo), which has built more than 1,700 armoured vehicles for the Italian Army, including all its heavy- and medium-weight armour.

The Centauro II has been designed to fit Italian Army requirements for a vehicle of no more than 30 tonnes gross vehicle weight (GVW), a power-to-weight ratio of 24 hp/tonne (compared with 17 for its predecessor), a maximum road speed of more than 100 km/h, a range of 800 km, and higher ballistic protection that its predecessor.

Centauro II is armed with a 120 mm/45 calibre gun fitted with a semi-automatic loading system, a coaxial 7.62x51 mm machine gun and a Hitrole L remote weapon station (armed with anything from a 7.62 mm machine gun to a 40 mm automatic grenade launcher). The main gun offers a step-change in performance over the previous Centauro, which was armed with a 105/52 main gun, and is able to fire any NATO-qualified 120 mm smoothbore ammunition, including programmable rounds. The new gun has greater range, accuracy, and firepower than its predecessor. The Centauro II's new turret offers a fire-on-the-move capability, something not offered by the original Centauro. The 120/45 gun is an evolution of the 120/44 gun from the Ariete main battle tank, but has been optimised for low recoil, including the installation of a pepperpot muzzlebreak and other features that reduce the recoil force from 45 tonnes in the Ariete to 25 tonnes in the Centauro II.
http://www.janes.com/article/61417/eurosatory-2016-iveco-launches-centauro-ii-tank-destroyer
 

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More firepower for Centauro [ES2016D5]
CHRISTOPHER F FOSS
17 June 2016

Being shown at Eurosatory for the first time is the Centauro II (8x8) mobile gun system (MGS).

This has been developed to meet the requirements of the Italian Army by CIO (Consortium Iveco Oto), which was established to handle all of the Italian Army tracked and wheeled armoured fighting vehicle (AFV) programmes. CIO consists of Iveco Defence Vehicles and Oto Melara, with the latter now trading as Leonardo (External Stand D501).

For the Centauro II MGS, Leonardo is responsible for the complete turret and associated weapon system, while Iveco is responsible for the hull and driveline. The first example of the Centauro II MGS was integrated at the Iveco facilities in Bolzano.

The new three-person turret is armed with a 120mm/45 calibre smoothbore gun that can fire standard NATO ammunition as well as the latest natures such as the DM11 high-explosive with a programmable fuze. The commander and gunner are provided with a stabilised day/ thermal sighting system with integrated laser rangefinder. The brand-new hull has a higher level of ballistic and mine protection.

It is powered by an Iveco diesel developing 720hp, coupled to an ZF automatic transmission, which gives a maximum road speed of 105km/h.

One prototype has been built and this should complete its extensive firing and mobility trials by the end of this year.

The Italian Army requirement is for 136 Centauro II MGS that will replace the currently deployed 105mm Centauro MGS, which is in use by Italy, Spain, Jordan and Oman.

When fielded, the Centauro II will provide the Italian army with a step change in capability.
http://www.janes.com/article/61554/more-firepower-for-centauro-es2016d5
 

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Versatile lifter [ES2016D5]
DAVID DONALD
17 June 2016

Appearing at Eurosatory for the first time, Korea Aerospace Industries (Hall 5, Stand K490) is promoting its Surion multipurpose helicopter, which was developed with input from Airbus Helicopters.

KAI is marketing the Surion around the world for a range of duties, concentrating initially on existing customers for its fixed-wing aircraft, such as Indonesia, Iraq, Peru and the Philippines.

Developed initially to meet a Republic of Korea Army requirement for a utility transport helicopter, the prototype of the KUH-1 first flew on 10 March 2010, and about 50 have been delivered from a requirement for more than 200. KAI has also developed a number of related versions, and has delivered three to the Korean police. A firefighting variant for the forestry department is currently being produced.

In the maritime domain, the type is being built for the Korean marines to provide a ship-to-shore assault capability.

KAI has also schemed an anti-submarine/anti-surface warfare version for a ROK Navy requirement. A government decision on whether to buy this aircraft or an imported type is expected some time this year.

In its KUH-1 version, the helicopter typically carries nine troops, with a crew of four (two pilots, two gunners). Power is provided by two Hanwha Techwin-built General Electric T700-701K turboshafts, a reardrive version of the engine that also powers the H-60 family and AH-64.
http://www.janes.com/article/61553/versatile-lifter-es2016d5
 

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Hail new Caesar [ES2016D5]

17 June 2016

Late last year, Nexter Systems (External Stand A600) presented its latest Caesar 155mm/52 calibre self-propelled artillery system integrated onto a Tatra (8x8) platform. Since then, some mobility and firing trials have been carried out and at Eurosatory the latest version is being shown with new features.

The original unprotected cab has been replaced by a four-door protected cab, which offers STANAG 4569 Level 2 ballistic and mine protection, but can be upgraded.

The standard Caesar used by France, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia and Thailand is based on a 6x6 platform, which carries 18 x 155mm projectiles and charges.

Because the 8x8 Caesar is based on a larger chassis, it has greater mobility and carries a total of 30 projectiles and a high number of modular charges. To reduce crew fatigue, an ammunition handling system has been fitted. Caesar also has a new muzzle velocity radar mounted to the right of the ordnance.
http://www.janes.com/article/61552/hail-new-caesar-es2016d5
 

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Toothless Tigr can still protect itself [ES2016D5]

17 June 2016
The Military Industrial Company (MIC, Hall 6, Stand D197) is the prime contractor for all of the Russian wheeled armoured fighting vehicles (AFVs), including the latest Bumerang (8x8) currently undergoing trials with the Russian Army, and the Tigr (4x4) special armoured vehicle. The latter is being shown at Eurosatory (pictured) fitted out for a crew of two and seven dismounts. It is in the unarmed configuration and fitted with a front-mounted winch.

Tigr has an all-welded monocoque armoured hull that is attached to the chassis at 10 points through rubber cushions.

The windows are of bullet-/ splinter-proof glass and these have integrated firing ports to allow the crew to fire from within the safety of the vehicle. Powered by a YaMZ-53472-10 four-cylinder inline turbocharged diesel developing 215hp coupled to a manual five-speed transmission, it has a maximum road speed of 120km/h and a maximum operating range of 950km.

As usual there are a wide range of options, including roof-mounted police light bars, spotlights, protective grilles, extra handheld loop straps for use when being used by special forces, extra steps, an air-conditioning system, a video observation system and blackout roller blinds.

When being used for military operations it can be fitted with a roof-mounted protected weapons station or a remote weapon station armed with a 7.62mm or 12.7mm machine gun.

The Russian Army deploys the Tigr for a wide range of battlefield missions, including fitted with roof-mounted launchers for the KBP Instrument Design Bureau Kornet laser-guided anti-tank guided weapon.
http://www.janes.com/article/61548/toothless-tigr-can-still-protect-itself-es2016d5
 

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SandCat observed [ES2016D5]
DAVID DONALD
17 June 2016

Plasan’s SandCat utility vehicle has returned to the show this year (External Stand E160) in its latest and most advanced form, outfitted as an observation platform and equipped with a thermal imaging system.

Mounted on the rear of the vehicle is a mast-mounted observation system that displays imagery at two side-facing operator stations in the rear cabin. In the front are driver and commander’s stations, the latter equipped with a tablet-style tactical situation display. Behind are two further seats, between which is a platform from which to operate a roof-mounted crew-served weapon. Connecting the vehicle systems is an advanced networked vetronics system.

SandCat features Plasan’s advanced lightweight composite armour that provides up to STANAG Level 3 ballistic protection without effect on either gross weight or performance.

The vehicle can be tailored for a diverse range of roles, from homeland security applications to special forces transport. Plasan (Hall 6, Stand B300) is also showcasing its extensive vehicle protection expertise.
http://www.janes.com/article/61545/sandcat-observed-es2016d5
 

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Puma advances [ES2016D5]
CHRISTOPHER F FOSS, Paris
17 June 2016

Production of the German Puma Armoured Infantry Fighting Vehicle (AIFV) is now ramping up, with more than 70 production vehicles delivered to the German Army from the two production lines.

Prime contractor for the AIFV is Projekt System & Management (PSM, External Stand D270), which is a joint venture formed between Krauss-Maffei Wegmann and Rheinmetall Defence.

Under current contracts, PSM will deliver a total of 350 Puma AIFVs by 2020, which includes a batch of eight driver training vehicles. Eurosatory Daily understands that the German Army may well increase its Puma order in the future by a significant number.

Puma is the most advanced vehicle of its type in the world and is fitted with a remote-controlled turret armed with a Mauser 30mm MK30-2 dualfeed cannon that can fire an air-bursting munition. A 5.56mm machine gun is mounted co-axial with this weapon, but this will be replaced in the future by a 7.62mm weapon.

Trials will soon start with a pod of two Euro Spike Long Range anti-tank guided missiles mounted externally on the left side of the turret.

Other future improvements include installation of a 40mm automatic grenade launcher on the rear that will fire lethal and non-lethal munitions.

Puma has a crew of three and carries six dismounts, all of whom are seated in the well-protected hull that has an advanced armour package as well as explosive reactive armour (ERA).
http://www.janes.com/article/61549/puma-advances-es2016d5
 

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Armed and ready [ES2016D5]

17 June 2016

CMI Defence (Hall 5, Stands K398/K378) is showing two members of its latest Cockerill 3000 series of modular turrets for the first time at Eurosatory.

The two-person turrets, the Cockerill 3030 and 3105, share a high level of common components to reduce through-lifecycle costs and training.

The Cockerill 3030 on display is installed on a Patria 8x8 AMV and armed with the Orbital ATK MK44 dual-feed cannon, a 7.62mm coaxial machine gun and banks of grenade launchers.

The 3105 shown alongside is integrated on a GDELS–MOWAG Piranha 8x8 and is armed with the CMI Defence 105mm rifled gun, which is fed by a bustle-mounted automatic loader with a 7.62mm coaxial machine gun.

In addition to firing conventional 105mm ammunition, the 3105 can fire a 105mm gun-launched anti-tank guided missile out to a range of 5,000m.

The turrets are in production for an undisclosed export customer for installation on an 8x8 platform.
http://www.janes.com/article/61551/armed-and-ready-es2016d5
 

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Ready to fire [ES2016D5]

17 June 2016

Lockheed Martin (Hall 6, Stand K201) has announced the award of a $331.8 million contract from the US Army for Lot 11 production of Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System (GMLRS) rockets.

The contract calls for the production of GMLRS Alternative Warhead (AW) rockets, GMLRS Unitary rockets and Reduced-Range Practice Rockets (RRPRs) for the US Army, US Marine Corps and for Foreign Military Sales (FMS) to Israel, Finland, Jordan and Singapore. Work will be carried out at the company facilities in Camden, Arkansas, and Dallas, Texas.

All deliveries are anticipated to be completed by March 2018.

The GMLRS is an all-weather rocket designed for fast deployment and delivering precision strike beyond the reach of most conventional weapons. The new GMLRS AW was the first munition developed to comply with US Department of Defense cluster munitions policy. GMLRS Unitary rockets exceed the required combat reliability rate, while the RRPR allows realistic training with full-motored rockets with limited flight range, making them ideal for smaller testing ranges.

Lockheed Martin has produced more than 30,000 GMLRS rockets at Camden.
http://www.janes.com/article/61550/ready-to-fire-es2016d5
 

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Solar flower power [ES2016D5]
SAM J BASCH
17 June 2016

In a fusion of solar and aerospace technologies, Smartflower Energy (Hall 5, Stand J338) developed Remules (renewable mobile ultra-light energy system), which is designed to provide sustainable energy solutions for military and humanitarian operations.

Based on the Austrian company’s range of products for the civilian market, Remules is manufactured entirely of carbonfibre materials. It is robust, yet lightweight enough to be set up by one person in less than 10 minutes.

According to Remules director Berndt Wesiak, it is the most efficient solar energy system available, producing up to 40 per cent more energy than fix-mounted systems. Its nominal power output is 2kWp (kilowattpeak) with the energy yield due to tracking equivalent to 2.7kWp.

It features an integrated GPS tracking mechanism to enable the solar modules, fanned out to form a flower-like disc, to follow the sun in two axes for optimised power output. The aerospace-quality composite material modules, using stealth solar technology to limit their radar signature, contain monocrystalline cells exceeding 22 per cent in efficiency.

Remules was developed by Smartflower in collaboration with partners in the Austrian and German aerospace industries, and supported by several entities, including the Red Cross and the Austrian Ministry of National Defence and Sport.
http://www.janes.com/article/61529/solar-flower-power-es2016d5
 

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All-terrain sideloader [ES2016D5]
DAVID DONALD
17 June 2016

As the military increasingly containerises its supply train and specialist systems, so the need for container lift has increased.

Hammar Maskin (Hall 5, Stand A338), based near Gothenburg in Sweden, but with manufacturing facilities around the world, is one of the world’s leading providers of sideloading equipment for the movement of containers and other large loads. It is displaying its latest military sideloader at Eurosatory, and is highlighting the vehicle’s extraordinary lifting capabilities, mobility, and rapid loading and unloading.

Known as the ATMAT-ISL (all-terrain mobile articulated transport – intermodal sideloader), the vehicle combines Hammar’s superstructure on a Volvo Defense all-terrain articulated hauler. The vehicle has outstanding off-road ability, while the Hammar lifting gear can upload up to 60 tonnes, completing a lift/lower cycle in just 3.5 minutes.

As well as the transport and repositioning of containers, the ATMAT-ISL can lift flat racks, which allows it to upload heavy armoured vehicles. Loads can be hoisted to and from truckbeds, and containers can be stacked.

The lifting system incorporates deployable legs that can be used on various surfaces to provide stability without the need for counterweights.

The ATMAT-ISL also has a towing hook that is strong enough to haul armoured vehicles behind.

http://www.janes.com/article/61527/all-terrain-sideloader-es2016d5
 

BLACKEAGLE

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Multicalibre fire support [ES2016D5]
DAVID DONALD
17 June 2016

During the late 1980s and early 1990s, Roketsan Missile Industries (Hall 6, Stand D178) undertook the development of multibarrel artillery rocket systems as part of a drive to modernise the Turkish Land Forces. The family has expanded, and now the company offers a range of systems based on three calibres of rocket.

Rockets for the systems are of 107mm, 122mm or 300mm calibre, offering a direct action capability over ranges between 3km and more than 100km (1.86 to more than 62 miles).

The TR-107 has a range of more than 11km/6.8 miles, and can be mounted in 12-round traditional steel launchers or 20-round insulated composite pods. The TR-122 has a range of 36km/22.4 miles with a high-explosive warhead. The TRB-122 is similar, but with a steel ball warhead. At the upper end of the range, the 100+km TR-300 has a combined HE/ball warhead.

To fire these weapons, Roketsan has developed a range of launchers, the latest of which are multibarrel rocket launch systems (MBRLS) able to fire different calibres of rockets. The T-107/122 multipurpose system is intended for short/medium-range engagements, and is highly mobile to support light and agile forces. Mounted on a 4x4 tactical vehicle, the system has three pods of TR-107 rockets, each capsule holding 20 rounds, plus a single 20-round pod of TR-122 rockets.

For heavier, longer-ranged engagements, the T-122/300 system combines two 20-round pods of 122mm rockets with a pair of two-tube launchers for 300mm rockets. This system would typically be mounted on a 6x6 or 8x8 heavy wheeled vehicle. As well as the launchers, the MBRLS includes vehicles for repair, ammunition supply, and command and control.

Their modular design and flexible structure means Roketsan’s multicalibre launch systems can also be modified to mount and launch other rocket calibres if the requirement arises.
http://www.janes.com/article/61519/multicalibre-fire-support-es2016d5
 

BLACKEAGLE

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Portable road unrolls on demand [ES2016D5]
SAM J BASCH
17 June 2016

Where roads become impassable or are non-existent, the military could do well to call upon Netherlands-based company RVM (Hall 5, Stand H490). A specialist in woven fabrics, RVM offers vehicle mobility products that help keep military or rescue vehicles on the move, no matter the road conditions.

RVM’s new Flatrack Deployment System (FDS) was developed to lay down a temporary road in a matter of minutes. Holding at least 100m of woven steel mesh, the system is mounted on any truck equipped with a hooklift system. The mesh unrolls as the truck reverses, thus providing a ‘paved driveway’ for heavy vehicles and equipment to traverse. Installation of the system requires only one operator and the truck driver.

“This portable roadway system is currently deployed by Polish forces in the multinational Exercise Anakonda 2016, now underway in Poland,” said Julian van Dijk, business development manager. “It is also operational in several other countries.”
http://www.janes.com/article/61526/portable-road-unrolls-on-demand-es2016d5
 
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