F-35 - News and Discussions

Eagle1

Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
4,596
Reactions
2,379 241 1
Lockheed Martin Meets 2017 F-35 Delivery Target


FORT WORTH, Texas, Dec. 18, 2017 -- On Friday, December 15, Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) delivered the 66th F-35 aircraft for the year, meeting the joint government and industry delivery target for 2017.


To date, more than 265 F-35 aircraft have been delivered to U.S. and international customers. More than 530 pilots and nearly 5,000 maintainers have been trained, and the F-35 fleet has surpassed more than 115,000 cumulative flight hours.

"Meeting our 2017 delivery commitment is a testament to the hard work and dedication of our joint government and industry team to deliver the transformational F-35 air system to the warfighter," said Lockheed Martin Executive Vice President and F-35 Program General Manager Jeff Babione. "The team continues to overcome program challenges and achieving this milestone gives our customers confidence that the F-35 enterprise can deliver on the increasing production quantities year-over-year."

Sixty-six F-35 deliveries in 2017 represents more than a 40 percent increase from 2016, and the F-35 enterprise is prepared to increase production volume year-over-year to hit full rate of approximately 160 aircraft in 2023.

Production Improvements

As production ramps and additional improvements are implemented, Lockheed Martin's goal is to reduce the cost of an F-35A to $80 million by 2020. With the incorporation of lessons learned, process efficiencies, production automation, facility and tooling upgrades, supply chain initiatives and more – the F-35 enterprise has already significantly reduced costs and improved efficiency. For example:

  • The price of an F-35A has come down more than 60 percent from the first contract.
  • Touch labor has been reduced by about 75 percent over the last five years.
  • Production span time has decreased by about 20 percent since 2015.
To prepare for an increase in production, Lockheed Martin has hired more than 1,300 employees at its Fort Worth, Texas facility since January 2017, and expects to hire a total of 1,800 as previously announced. The F-35 is built by thousands of men and women in America and around the world. With about 1,400 domestic suppliers in 46 states and Puerto Rico, the program supports more than 170,000 direct and indirect U.S. jobs and delivers $24 billion of economic impact annually. The program also includes more than 100 international suppliers, creating or sustaining thousands of international jobs.

The supersonic, multi-role F-35 represents a transformational capability providing unprecedented situational awareness, lethality and survivability. It combines next generation characteristics of radar evading stealth, supersonic speed, and fighter agility with the most powerful and comprehensive integrated sensor package of any fighter aircraft in history.

http://news.lockheedmartin.com/2017-12-18-Lockheed-Martin-Meets-2017-F-35-Delivery-Target
 

Eagle1

Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
4,596
Reactions
2,379 241 1
How the F-35 Got Its Name
 

Eagle1

Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
4,596
Reactions
2,379 241 1
Lockheed awarded $7.5M contract to move F-35 support to Florida
The work expected to be done at Eglin Air Force Base includes installation, integration and testing of the F-35 for Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom.

By Allen Cone
Jan. 18, 2018

Lockheed-awarded-75M-contract-to-move-F-35-support-to-Florida.jpg

A Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II takes off from the Eglin Air Force Base runway in Florida. The Partner Support Complex there provides service and testing of the F-35 for U.S. partner nations. Photo by Samuel King Jr./U.S. Air Force

Jan. 18 (UPI) -- Lockheed Martin has received a $7.47 million contract to move an F-35 support center for three partner nations from Fort Worth, Texas, to Eglin Air Force Base in northwest Florida.

The contract, announced by the Department of Defense on Wednesday, is for the relocation of the F-35 Australia, Canada, United Kingdom Reprogramming Laboratory, or ACURL, which handles packing, shipping, installation, integration and testing of the aircraft for Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom.

The move is expected to be completed by March 2019.

The contract also provides for initial spare parts for the nations at Eglin Air Force Base and in Fort Worth.

The Partner Support Complex at Eglin Air Force Base is a U.S.-owned operation that handles testing for the F-35 Lightning II, a fifth-generation aircraft.

Testing for Australia, Canada and Britain is housed in one building, while work for Norway, Italy, Denmark, Netherlands and Turkey is done elsewhere on the base.

The staff at Eglin assigned to the work started with 24 civilian employees but is expected to grow to about 100 personnel. The unit reports to the 53rd Electronic Warfare Group Wing.

The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., handled the new contract.

https://www.upi.com/Defense-News/2018/01/18/Lockheed-awarded-75M-contract-to-move-F-35-support-to-Florida/9141516300589/?utm_source=sec&utm_campaign=sl&utm_medium=2
 

Eagle1

Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
4,596
Reactions
2,379 241 1
U.S. State Department clears potential (and likely) sale of F-35s to Belgium
20 Jan 2018
By: Valerie Insinna

WASHINGTON — The U.S. State Department on Friday pre-emptively approved a sale of F-35s to Belgium, opening the door to an expedited purchase once the country selects its future fighter.

The proposed deal, worth an estimated $6.53 billion, would cover 34 F-35A conventional takeoff and landing models made by Lockheed Martin and 38 F-135 engines manufactured by Pratt & Whitney.

It also includes electronic warfare systems, communications gear, a full mission trainer and Lockheed’s Autonomic Logistics Information System — which facilitates maintenance, mission planning and logistics — as well as other equipment, the Defense Security Agency stated.

While it’s uncommon for the State Department to green-light a weapons sale ahead of a final decision by a foreign nation, it’s not unheard of, particularly for high-profile deals with close allies. Most recently, the department ok’ed a sale of 18 Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornets to Canada this September, but a final agreement never materialized due to a trade dispute.

The F-35 is overwhelmingly considered the favorite for the Belgian fighter competition, which will replace the country’s 54 F-16s with 34 new jets. Should Belgium select the joint strike fighter, the total value of the deal will likely change after negotiations, as DSCA often puts forward a high contract estimate.

Competing against the joint strike fighter are the Dassault Rafale — which the French government is aggressively promoting — and the Eurofighter Typhoon, which is manufactured by a consortium of BAE Systems, Leonardo and Airbus.

The field had been much more crowded at the start of 2017, with Boeing vying to sell more Super Hornets and Swedish aerospace manufacturer Saab putting forward the Gripen E.

However, Boeing withdrew from the contest in April, saying that it could not fairly compete in a matchup skewed toward the F-35.

Then in July, the Swedish government crushed Saab’s chances, with Sweden its decision to abstain from the competition due to the fact that the government could not meet Belgium’s operational support requirements.

After Saab dropped out, Byron Callan, director of the Capital Alpha Partners investment consulting firm, predicted the F-35 would win.

“As one of the four countries that purchased F-16s in part of the ‘deal of the century’ in 1975, Belgium is the only country that has not yet reached a decision. Denmark, the Netherlands and Norway have all selected the Lockheed Martin F-35,” he wrote in an emailed newsletter.


https://www.defensenews.com/air/2018/01/19/us-state-department-clears-potential-and-likely-sale-of-f-35s-to-belgium/
 

Eagle1

Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
4,596
Reactions
2,379 241 1
U.S. Air Force taps general to investigate ongoing oxygen incidents
By Daniel Uria
Jan. 22, 2018

The U.S. Air Force appointed Brig. Gen. Bobbi Jo Doorenbos to lead a team to investigate ongoing oxygen deprivation and other physiological incidents like those that temporarily grounded all F-35 jets, like the one pictured here, flying at an airbase in Arizona. File Photo by Tech. Sgt. Heather Redman/U.S. Air Force

Jan. 22 (UPI) -- The U.S. Air Force has created a new team to record and research ongoing cases of oxygen deprivation and other physiological incidents, the service announced Monday.

Brig. Gen. Bobbi Jo Doorenbos will lead the Unexplained Physiologic Events Integration Team, which will serve to identify solutions to prevent or minimize such issues.

"As part of the integrated effort to address physiological events, the Air Force is providing more resources to understand UPEs, standardize response actions to such events and assess options for more robust aircrew training to recognize and respond to these events," said Doorenbos.

Physiological events occur when air crew experience symptoms resulting from factors such as hypoxia, hypocapnia, hypercapnia or disorientation, which can hinder their ability to fly effectively.

The Air Force temporarily grounded all F-35 jets flying at an airbase in Arizona in June after pilots reported oxygen deprivation in five incidents.

In each case, the backup oxygen system worked and the pilot safely landed the plane.

The Navy also experienced hypoxia-related incidents when two pilots died after their T-45C Goshawk training jets crashed in October.

The Air Force said physiological events are rare, but heightened awareness has led to an increase of reported incidents.

"The probability that a pilot will experience a physiological event is less than 1 percent per year," Doorenbos said. "Still, we are aggressively addressing these events and communicating with aircrew so they remain confident in their aircraft and weapon systems."

https://www.upi.com/Defense-News/2018/01/22/US-Air-Force-taps-general-to-investigate-ongoing-oxygen-incidents/3101516655851/?utm_source=sec&utm_campaign=sl&utm_medium=14
 

Eagle1

Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
4,596
Reactions
2,379 241 1
Japan's F-35A Makes First Deployment to Spy, Defend Airspace
26.01.2018

The Japanese Air Self-Defense Force's first F-35A aircraft has deployed to northeastern Japan "at a time when neighboring countries have been quickly building up their air force capabilities," the island nation's defense minister told reporters Friday.

The aircraft will monitor Japanese airspace and conduct surveillance over North Korea from Misawa Air Base in Aomori Prefecture, Kyodo News reported, where the Japanese air fleet will eventually station 10 F-35As.

In total, Japan has ordered 42 fifth-generation F-35A stealth fighters – the aircraft's traditional runway-based variant – from Lockheed Martin, but the company has been slow to deliver the orders.

In 2019, the Japanese Defense Ministry plans to acquire long-range joint strike missiles, a weapon tailored to the F-35. However, Tokyo's procurement of these missiles has not been without controversy, since they provide an offensive capability for the "self-defense" force. Japan's military capabilities are limited by the country's constitution to self-defense, not offensive operations.

According to Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera, "the introduction of the missiles is not aimed at targeting enemy military bases. We rely on US strike capabilities for attacking enemy bases and this will remain unchanged."

Lockheed Martin has teamed with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries to build the jets for Japan. Japan's first four F-35A aircraft were produced in Lockheed's Fort Worth, Texas, facility and the other 38 are slated to come off the production line from a Mitsubishi plant in Japan. The F-35A that landed at Misawa Air Base for deployment was built in the Mitsubishi facility, Kyodo News noted.

https://sputniknews.com/asia/201801261061107784-japan-f-35-deployment-spy-defend/
 

Eagle1

Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
4,596
Reactions
2,379 241 1
Italian Navy receives first F-35B built outside US
January 26, 2018
italian-navy-receives-first-f-35b-built-outside-us.jpg

Photo: Italian defense ministry

The Italian Navy on January 25 received the first Short Take-Off/Vertical Landing (STOVL) F-35B Lightning II aircraft assembled at the Final Assembly and Checkout (FACO) in Cameri, Italy.

This is the first F-35B built outside the United States.

The Italian FACO is operated by Leonardo in conjunction with Lockheed Martin with a current workforce of more than 800 skilled personnel engaged in full assembly of the Conventional Take-Off/Landing F-35A and F-35B STOVL aircraft variants and F-35A wing production.

General Claudio Granziano, Chief of Italian Defense General Staff; Admiral Valter Girardelli, Chief of the Italian Navy; Italian Air Force Lt. Gen. Francesco Langella, Director ARMAEREO; Air Commodore Charles Docherty, F-35 Joint Program Office; Filippo Bagnato, Director of Leonardo Aircraft Division; and Mr. Doug Wilhelm, Lockheed Martin F-35 Program Management Vice President, spoke at the milestone event.

italy-f-35b-768x514.jpg

“The production of the first F-35 B-model, the most technically complex variant, here at the Italian FACO is a testament to the outstanding capability and quality of the Italian aerospace industry,” Wilhelm said. “The Cameri FACO continues to prove itself as a European F-35 center of excellence.”

To date, nine F-35As and one F-35B have been delivered from the Cameri FACO, which is the only F-35B production facility outside the United States. Four of those jets are now based at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, for international pilot training and five are at Amendola Air Base, Italy.

The Cameri FACO is also programmed to produce 29 F-35As for the Royal Netherlands Air Force and retains the capacity to deliver to other European partners in the future.

Three distinct variants of the 5th generation fighter will replace and supplement the A-10 and F-16 for the US Air Force, the F/A-18 for the US Navy, the F/A-18 and AV-8B Harrier for the US Marine Corps, and a variety of fighters for at least 11 other countries.

The Italian F-35As/Bs replace the legacy Panavia Tornado, AMX and AV-8B aircraft. More than 265 production F-35s have been delivered fleet-wide and more than 550 trained F-35 pilots have flown more than 120,000 flight hours, to date.
https://navaltoday.com/2018/01/26/italian-navy-receives-first-f-35b-built-outside-us/?uid=1067
 

Similar threads


Top