F15-EX Overview, Specification, Performance | Page 7 | World Defense

F15-EX Overview, Specification, Performance

Gripen9

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Boeing Bid To Sell F-15EX Eagles To India Faces Stiff Competition
Sebastien Roblin
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Aerospace & Defense

Operation Iraqi Freedom

IN FLIGHT - JULY 6: In this handout image provided by the U.S. Air Force, an F-15 Strike Eagle ... [+]
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Boeing BA -1.2% is showing growing interest in selling its F-15EX twin-engine multi-role fighters to the Indian Air Force. Back in February, Boeing Vice President Pratyush Kumar stated the company was seeking a license to export the F-15EX to India—a request which may soon be granted according to Indian defense journalist Shiv Aroor.
This latest variant of the nearly 50-year-old F-15 combines decades of upgrades developed for export model Eagles into a new multi-role platform for U.S. service with Air National Guard squadrons. The first eight F-15EXs out of an expected final order of 144 to 200 are due off the St. Louis assembly line in 2021.
Boeing has had some success exporting military aircraft to India, notably deals for Apache Guardian and Chinook helicopters, as well as C-17 transports and P-8I patrol planes. But it has so far been unsuccessful in offering another twin-engine fighter, the FA-18 Super Hornet, to meet the same Indian Air Force requirement the F-15 may be aimed at.
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If Boeing can secure the necessary authorizations, the venerable F-15—a type famously undefeated in air-to-air combat—may then confront a flock of more recent designs.

New Delhi’s Endless Quest for Foreign Fighters
India’s Medium Multi-Role Combat Aircraft (MMRCA) competition to procure between 126 to 200 “medium fighters” has been a mess since its inception in 2001, dragging on so long the Indian Air Force’s initial preferred choice, the Mirage 2000, ceased to be available for production.
In 2012, India decided to buy France’s cutting-edge Dassault Rafale fighter. But for the final deal signed in 2016, India only ordered 36 jets for €7.81 billion (over $9.2 billion). The resulting 41% increase in unit price caused a political scandal.
Congress Supporters Protest Against BJP Over Rafale Deal

NEW DELHI, INDIA - MARCH 7: Activists of the Delhi Pradesh Youth Congress shout slogans during a ... [+]
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Facing a huge impending shortfall of fighters as India retires its old MiG-21 and MiG-27 jets, New Delhi then issued a new requirement for 114 single-engine light fighters, which seemingly boiled down to a choice between Swedish Saab’s JAS 39 Gripen fighter and an upgraded version of the Lockheed-Martin F-16 (later re-branded the F-21) built in India in cooperation with Tata.
This might have been a quick done deal, but the Indian Air Force apparently didn’t really want to consider only single-engine fighters and rebooted the procurement yet again in February 2018, this time allowing twin-engine aircraft. While the IAF has yet to issue specific requirements, it reportedly is now seeking 114 aircraft for a procurement that could total $15 billion or more.
For now, virtually every advanced fourth-generation jet fighter available for export (save for those from China, a military rival) is now on the table.
It’s worth noting India could also eventually end up pursuing a fifth-generation stealth aircraft: perhaps a a mature form of Russia’s Su-57 Felon stealth fighter—though New Delhi withdrew from a program to co-develop an Indian variant called the FGFA—or Lockheed’s fifth-generation F-35 stealth fighter, subject of some Indian interest.
What does the F-15 bring to the table?
The Indian Air Force faces a political choice as much as a technical one as New Delhi balances its relationship between its historical arms supplier Russia, and its growing partnership with Washington in countering pressure from China.
Notably, the U.S. CAATSA act means it could theoretically sanction India for Russian arms purchases, though it has so far refrained from doing so.
The choice will be hugely significant beyond the value of the airframes themselves. Combat aircraft are built for compatibility with national “eco-systems” of avionics (including radars, datalinks, electronic warfare suites etc.) and weapons ranging from air-to-air missiles to GPS-guided glide bombs.
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A Sukhoi Su-30MKI combat aircraft of the Indian Air Force takes off during an aerial display at ... [+]
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For example, Russian R-73 and R-77 air-to-air missiles are compatible with both MiG-29 and Su-30 fighters; and a technician specialized in maintenance of one aircraft’s systems may more easily transfer those skills to work with another.
The IAF has never operated American jet fighters before. Currently the Indian Air Force flies Russian Su-30s, MiG-21s and MiG-29s and French Jaguars, Mirage 2000s and Rafales, in addition to its growing fleet of domestic Tejas jet fighters. The Indian Navy also operates MiG-29K carrier-based fighters. The IAF recently purchased 12 more Su-30s and 21 MiG-29s to shore up its flagging numbers.
A decision to purchase American-built fighters would require India to invest in a broader inventory of weapons and avionics systems, in turn encouraging further purchases from the United States. That would mark a politically significant break from its long history of Russian arm purchases.
The F-15EX versus the Field
Let’s consider the tradeoffs between various jet fighters being considered by the IAF.
On one end of the spectrum of choices are less expensive (but not unsophisticated), short-range single-engine tactical fighters, notably the Lockheed F-16/F-21, Saab Gripen and Russia’s Mikoyan-i-Gurevich MiG-35 (an evolved MiG-29).
Though these are excellent aircraft for sparring at the border, they may have difficulty carrying heavy loads over long distances, and one wonders if the IAF really is interested in single-engine fighters having rebooted the competition to include twin-engine jets. Furthermore, India just ordered 83 more domestic Tejas single-engine jets which fill that niche.
Next, there are middle-weight twin-engine jets like the Super Hornet, Rafale and the Eurofighter Typhoon to consider. Though not stealth aircraft, these later designs boast radar cross-sections around one-fifth or less that of the Eagle.
The Typhoon is superior at high-altitude, high-speed air-to-air combat, while the Rafale is stronger at lower altitudes, can operate from more austere airfields, and has better ability to penetrate air defense capabilities thanks to its SPECTRA electronic warfare self-defense system. Both have a slower maximum speed than the Eagle’s Mach 2.5, but are capable of cruising at supersonic speeds without using afterburners while the Eagle cannot.
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A French made Rafale jet fighter is exhibited in the workshops of Dassault-Aviation in Merignac near ... [+]
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Boeing’s twin-engine FA-18E/F Super Hornet Block III is noted for its advanced networked sensors and it ability to achieve high angles of attack at low speeds. But though likely less expensive, it is limited by its short combat range and doesn’t exhibit the raw flight performance of its land-based European rivals.
It’s also worth recalling the IAF already chose the Rafale over the Typhoon, Super Hornet and F-16 in 2012. Reportedly the U.S. jets were downgraded because the IAF evaluation criteria emphasized hot-rod flight performance characteristics over avionics.
Further increasing the IAF’s small Rafale fleet may be more economical than procuring an entirely new type. However, the Super Hornet may also offer economies if it’s chosen to fulfill a requirement for 57 jets for the Indian Navy. The Super Hornet’s F414 turbofans may also be integrated in future Indian combat aircraft. (However, the Indian Navy is also considering the carrier-based Rafale-M!)
(FILES) This photograph taken on Februar

(FILES) This photograph taken on February 11, 2009, shows a US Navy F/A-18F Super Hornet strike ... [+]
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Finally, on the heavy multi-role side of the spectrum are the F-15EX and its Russian counterpart, the Sukhoi Su-35S Flanker-E, a successor to the Su-30MKI Flanker-C jets in service with India.
Both the Eagle and Flanker-E are capable of attaining higher maximum speeds, flying longer distances, and carrying heavy payloads than the aforementioned light and medium fighters.
Why might India opt for a heavy fighter for its medium fighter competition? Long-range fighters may be desirable for patrolling the Indian Ocean where China’s PLA Navy is increasing its presence. Heavy fighters could also conduct penetrating strikes more deeply inside enemy territory—though admittedly at significant risk due to not being stealth aircraft. Finally, heavy fighters could carry heavier munitions, including potentially hypersonic missiles or India’s Brahmos cruise missile.
MAKS 2019 air show in Zhukovsky, outside Moscow, Day 4

MOSCOW REGION, RUSSIA AUGUST 30, 2019: A Sukhoi Su-35S air superiority fighter performs a flight at ... [+]
SERGEI BOBYLEV/TASS
Compared head to head, the Su-35 undoubtedly is more maneuverable than the F-15EX thanks to its thrust-vector engines, boasts a powerful long-range multimode Irbis-E radar, and it’s airframe is moderately less visible on radar.
However, some of the F-15EX improvements narrow the gap between the earlier F-15C and the Su-35S in terms of sensors, self-defense systems, and payload.
For example, the F-15EX’s APG-82 AESA radar is arguably superior to the Su-35’s Irbis because it is higher-resolution, harder to detect and more resistant to jamming; it also can efficiently scan and jam simultaneously. The F-15EX also finally incorporates an infrared sensor, a longtime feature of Russian fighters. The F-15’s dated self-defense suite has also been updated with the new EPAWSS system.
In terms of munitions, Russian R-77 air-to-air missiles theoretically out-range U.S. AIM-120 missiles. However, India reportedly found in an air battle in 2019 that jets armed with R-77s were in practice outranged by Pakistani F-16s equipped with AIM-120Cs. Russia has also reportedly struggled to produce and deploy the more advanced R-77-1 variant.
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Media personnel take images of missiles of an Indian Mig-21 fighter aircraft, which was being flown ... [+]
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Though Russia has produced diverse precision air-to-ground weapons, the U.S. has combat-tested and mass produced such weapons on a vastly greater scale.
In terms of price, the export Su-35 and F-15EX appear to come in the mid-$80 millions to $70 millions according to various reports. However, Russia has claimed it can build Su-35s for roughly half that price, so India might be able to bargain for a reduced rate.
Another important consideration: the Su-35S has a service life of 6,000 flight hours, while the F-15EX is rated for an extraordinary 20,000 hours. Furthermore, India has had reliability issues with its Russian-built MiG-29 and Su-30 aircraft.
In the end much remains uncertain regarding India’s fighter procurement. Is the IAF leaning towards light or heavy combat jets, or something in between? Will it opt to operates its first ever U.S.-built fighters, or keep things familiar by buying Russian as it usually has in the past? Or will New Delhi turn to a European manufacturer again?
Whatever the case, Boeing appears inclined to cast new chips into the pot of an already long-running game being played for very high stakes.

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mtime7

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After Rafale F15 has no chance india will go more Rafale
It depends on what role they are looking to fill, I believe they should have bought more Rafale, but there are roles that it will not fill, so a larger aircraft maybe necessary
 

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It depends on what role they are looking to fill, I believe they should have bought more Rafale, but there are roles that it will not fill, so a larger aircraft maybe necessary
You maybe right but it will cost alot of money 72 Rafale around 19 billions and F15? $$$$$$$$$$
 

mtime7

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You maybe right but it will cost alot of money 72 Rafale around 19 billions and F15? $$$$$$$$$$
Isn't 72 F-15 6.12Billion? That should be fly away cost with spare parts and everything. Or is my math that bad
 

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Isn't 72 F-15 6.12Billion? That should be fly away cost with spare parts and everything. Or is my math that bad
Qatar will buy 72 about 12 billions I dont think india have this much spare for new platform
 

mtime7

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Qatar will buy 72 about 12 billions I dont think india have this much spare for new platform
maybe I am having a serious brain fart today, but wouldn't that be about 167 million per jet? Qatar must be getting a lot more than just a fly away plane, they must be getting a ship load of weapons and contractor mechanics, hell they might even be getting some Boeing pilots to fly them. I can't remember which Asian country that Boeing provided pilots for their F18's, but they did
 

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Could the F-15EX Transform the U.S. Defense Industry?​

Can Boeing, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force use an old fighter to teach the U.S. aerospace industry new tricks?

As was widely reported in July, the Air Force has decided to acquire a large number of F-15EX fighters over the next several years. The F-15EX was initially expected to replace the elderly F-15 C/D, but the latest reports indicate that it may also replace the Air Force’s fleet of F-15Es.

Essentially, the F-15EX concept binds generations of technological innovation into the very old F-15 airframe. The F-15EX uses the classic F-15 frame but incorporates a host of technological improvements developed over the course of the last thirty years.


Serial production of the F-15, driven largely by foreign sales in recent years, enables the integration of new technologies and keeps both the workforce and the manufacturing facilities fresh. The logic of replacing the F-15E (alongside the F-15C/D) is straightforward:
- the F-15 and the F-35 have overlapping, non-identical missions and capabilities;

the F-15EX significantly expands the capabilities of the existing F-15 fleet

- Eliminating the need for expensive service life extension programs.

At the very least, the F-15EX project means that the Air Force will have new, advanced airframes capable of doing the jobs that F-15s have been doing for decades.

More interesting, however, is the idea that the F-15EX may offer a pathway into the Digital Century Series (DCS). To review, the Century Series concept (associated most notably with Air Force chief of acquisition Wil Roper) involves designing and building an evolutionary set of airframes in small batches with open-source architecture. Roper has embraced the “Century Series” metaphor, notwithstanding the lack of success of the first “Century Series” which produced a set of mediocre aircraft soon eclipsed by the F-4 Phantom II, and critiques that the focus on manned aircraft is misplaced, and that the attention given to the DCS would be more profitably spent on unmanned aerial vehicles.

In the DCS concept, digital engineering technologies would allow the separation of production and design, while the use of 3D printing and other advanced manufacturing technologies would remedy some of the problems associated with the multiplication of spares and maintenance procedures. More importantly, the system would enable to continuous integration of new technologies into new airframes, as opposed to the much slower process necessitated by the precise requirements of stealth airframes. Thus, the “Digital Century Series” represents an entirely new way of thinking about aircraft acquisition, and indeed could lead to a substantial restructuring of the US aerospace industry

It’s wrong to say that the F-15EX is the first stage of the DCS. Stephen Trimble argues that while the F-15EX program uses many of the same tools that the Digital Century Series envisions, including advanced computer modeling and a modular platform, it is not part of the DCS per se. Trimble also discusses some differences in the handling of intellectual property between the two systems, as Boeing retains substantial rights over the F-15EX while the DCS system envisions full ownership of the relevant IP by the Air Force.

But this does not mean that the F-15EX experience will not serve as a useful test for the DCS process. Boeing has noted that the F-15EX will include a set of design features that will enable rapid upgrades, and also access to the Air Force’s new battle management system, a key part of DCS thinking. Roper himself has touted the connections between the F-15EX and the DCS, notwithstanding the evident architectural gaps.

Not least important, the F-15EX ensures that Boeing will remain a player in the fighter business. Part of Roper’s objective in pursuing the DCS has been to limit and possibly reverse the industry consolidation that occurred in the military aerospace sector from the 1990s on. Some DCS advocates have even suggested the nationalization of certain aspects of the military aerospace industry, which would resemble in some ways the Soviet system of separate state-owned design bureaus and production facilities. This seems perhaps a step too far, given the history of the US defense industrial base and existing U.S. political realities. But the ability of Boeing to use digital tools to design and produce the F-15EX necessarily makes it a player in the next stage of the Air Force’s project development.

The F-15EX is hardly an inexpensive aircraft, with the cost of new models exceeds that of the F-35A. From the basis of a very old airplane, however, it offers the potential for a new way of thinking about how the Air Force will manage the age-old problem of balancing the existing fleet needs against the relentless advance of technology. If the F-15EX program leads to important lessons learned that enables the DCS, it resolves the problem of putting all of the Air Force’s eggs into a single high-technology basket, such as the F-22 or F-35. But the practical application of this theory of design remains untested, and it cannot be denied that building legacy fighters during a period of resurgent great power competition opens up many questions about the ability of the US aerospace industry to offer long-term defense solutions.

Dr. Robert Farley has taught security and diplomacy courses at the Patterson School since 2005. He received his BS from the University of Oregon in 1997, and his Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 2004. Dr. Farley is the author of Grounded: The Case for Abolishing the United States Air Force (University Press of Kentucky, 2014), the Battleship Book (Wildside, 2016), and Patents for Power: Intellectual Property Law and the Diffusion of Military Technology (University of Chicago, 2020). He has contributed extensively to a number of journals and magazines, including the National Interest, the Diplomat: APAC, World Politics Review, and the American Prospect. Dr. Farley is also a founder and senior editor of Lawyers, Guns and Money.

Image: Boeing.
 

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GE ships first engines for F-15EX fighter

By Craig Hoyle
16 September 2020

GE Aviation has delivered its first F110-129 engines for integration with Boeing’s F-15EX fighter, ahead of the new model’s flight debut next year.
Announcing the development on 16 September, GE said its relationship with Boeing on the project dates back to 2014, when the propulsion supplier “began investing resources and made a long-term commitment to become qualified on the F-15EX”.

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Source: GE Aviation
GE’s first contract covers provision of 19 F110-129 engines

The US Air Force (USAF) in June awarded Boeing a contract to produce a first batch of eight interceptors, without disclosing its engine selection. GE confirms that during the same month it received a Lot 1 contract from the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center to supply 19 F110-129s, plus modernised engine monitoring system computers.

Shawn Warren, GE Aviation’s vice-president and general manager of large combat and mobility engines, says the company’s F110 production line is “fully operational and ready to serve the F-15EX programme”.

“We’re proud to deliver these engines to Boeing and do our part to ensure the air force’s rapid fielding requirements are met to maintain fighter aircraft capacity,” Warren adds.

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Source: Boeing
US Air Force plans to buy 144 of the new-generation fighter


Due to enter squadron service from 2023, the F-15EX is intended to allow the USAF to rapidly re-equip squadrons currently flying aged F-15C/Ds. It intends to acquire up to 144 examples, but could eventually increase this to as many as 200.

GE notes that F110s have powered all the F-15s delivered since 2012, including aircraft for export operators Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Singapore.
 

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Can Boeing score 60-year production run with rejuvenated F-15?

By Craig Hoyle
15 September 2020

Even before the US Air Force (USAF) ordered an initial eight examples in an EX-model configuration in July, Boeing’s F-15 programme had already achieved remarkable longevity.

Worth almost $1.2 billion, the award marked the first step towards the service acquiring a planned 144 of the type: total business valued at $23 billion. Longer term, EX output for the USAF could reach 200 airframes.

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Source: Boeing
US Air Force will field new-generation EX model from 2023


At the time of the contract announcement, an initial pair of test aircraft were already in the advanced stage of assembly at Boeing’s St Louis site in Missouri. These will be flown for the first time and handed over to the air force in the first quarter of next year, and used to support assessment tasks.

Four more aircraft will be employed for development and operational testing by the service, before production deliveries swiftly commence.
In mid-August, the USAF announced that training activities will begin in 2022, at Kingsley Field Air National Guard (ANG) base in Oregon. A first active squadron to receive the type will be established at the ANG’s Portland base in the same state in 2023. This rapid fielding plan was a pivotal factor in the F-15EX’s selection to replace some of the USAF’s F-15C/D interceptors, which Cirium fleets data shows are an average of 36 years old.

Faced with a looming shortage of air dominance fighters, the service opted to quickly acquire the new type instead of fielding some Lockheed Martin F-35As. The EX’s projected per-hour operating cost of $29,000 is one-third less than for the stealthy Lightning II, and Boeing says platform and system commonality with the F-15C/D means pilots and maintainers could transition to the replacement model “in a matter of days, as opposed to years”.

The USAF’s selection extends a decades-old relationship. The then McDonnell Douglas delivered its first three F-15As to the service for testing in 1972, after it had selected the twin-engined type five years earlier. Initial operating capability was declared in 1975, and formal entry into service occurred during 1976.

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Source: US Air Force
A-model fighter was introduced to service in 1976


After receiving almost 800 A/B- and C/D-model fighters, the USAF also introduced the ground-attack-optimised F-15E Strike Eagle, with deliveries of 253 aircraft running between 1988 and 2004.

By mid-August 2020, total F-15 programme deliveries stood at 1,752 aircraft for the USAF and five international customers, Cirium data shows. Of that number, 1,065 remain in active service, along with four examples flown for test purposes by NASA. The USAF employs 457 C/D/Es, with the remainder flown by Israel (85), Japan (200), Saudi Arabia (224), Singapore (40) and South Korea (59).

INTERNATIONAL SUCCESS​

Israel in 1976 became the type’s first international customer, and its air force today has the unique distinction of still operating the F-15 in each of its A/B/C/D variants, plus 25 ground-attack-specialist F-15Is.

Annual deliveries rose rapidly to total 115 in 1977 and 116 the following year, before hitting a peak of 130 in 1979, Cirium data shows. Japan was another early adopter of the type, with Boeing- and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries-completed J/DJ examples fielded from 1980.

Cirium information shows that shipments averaged 70 per year through the 1980s, before reducing to an average of 35 during the 1990s and six in the 2000s. This came as E-model output concluded and the assembly line relied on export orders from Singapore and South Korea. Notably, 2001 saw zero deliveries made – the only blank recorded through the programme’s history.

Annual output in the decade from 2010 maintained double figures, with an average of 13 handed over per year. These included more SG-model fighters for Singapore and K-variant jets for South Korea, plus a new class of Advanced F-15s for Saudi Arabia. Delivered from 2013 via an 84-aircraft procurement, Riyadh’s SA-variant – which followed its earlier introduction of C/Ds – was the first to feature fly-by-wire (FBW) flight controls.

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Source: Cirium fleets data

With shipments to Saudi Arabia poised to conclude, Boeing is currently producing derivative F-15QA (Qatar Advanced) fighters for Doha. The Gulf nation’s first example made its debut flight from St Louis in mid-April, as part of a 36-aircraft purchase. Deliveries will run from 2021-2022, according to Cirium, while an option to double the size of its fleet could lead to another 36 being transferred between 2023 and 2025.
Boeing F-15 programme manager Prat Kumar says the USAF’s new EX model also draws on the lessons of a five-year test campaign conducted for Saudi Arabia.
The USAF aircraft will retain the Advanced F-15’s two-seat configuration, although the service plans to operate the type with only one crew member. Kumar says this reflects its desire to rapidly replace the C/D-model fleet with “a jet that can be incorporated into service without a lot of fielding and pilot training”.
“This is a jet that first started flying in the ’70s, but today we’re building it in an entirely different way,” Kumar says. “Digital engineering is enabling that.”
By creating a “digital replica” of aircraft sections, the company has driven major production enhancements, already seen during assembly of the first two jets.

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Source: Boeing
Programme’s lead aircraft are already in the advanced stage of assembly
Using 3D models, Boeing has been able to more efficiently outsource work to its supply chain, for example the exact drilling of holes for fasteners.
“Parts can be manufactured in a supply base in a very precise manner,” Kumar says. “When you bring [the parts] into the factory, it all comes together and the hundreds of thousands of holes line up in the assembly area.” He adds: “When we did the nose barrel, after the initial learning curve, it led to almost a 70% reduction in touch labour in the workshop.”
Key technologies to be incorporated with the F-15EX include a Raytheon APG-82 active electronically scanned array radar and an advanced cockpit system. This features a large-area display measuring 10 x 19in, low-profile head-up display and use of the Collins Elbit Vision Systems Digital Joint Helmet-Mounted Cueing System. This combination will provide pilots with “unprecedented situational awareness”, says Kumar.
The EX will use an open mission system architecture, employing Boeing’s Advanced Display Core Processor II – a technology described by Kumar as “perhaps the fastest mission computer on any fighter jet in the world”. The aircraft’s Operational Flight Program Suite 9.1X software will also retain commonality with the standard currently used by USAF F-15s, he adds, “maintaining interoperability across the entire fleet”.
“That digital backbone, open mission systems and agile software development really forms the ‘holy trinity’ that allows us to rapidly test new capabilities on this jet – not just for the F-15, but broadly for the air force, that can be deployed elsewhere,” Kumar says.
Self-protection will come from BAE Systems’ Eagle Passive Active Warning Survivability System, which is currently in flight testing using six aircraft at Eglin AFB, Florida.

EXPANDED LOADOUT​

Retaining Mach 2.5 performance and a 65,000ft operating ceiling, the fighter will have an expanded loadout of up to 12 air-to-air missiles carried at wing and fuselage stations. Other payload options include Lockheed’s pod-housed Legion infrared search and track sensor, acquired for the F-15C fleet.
Alternatively, it could also provide the service with a crucial capability for a non-bomber platform to deploy a future class of hypersonic strike weapons, thanks to a centreline stores point capable of carrying a 6.7m (22ft)-long weapon weighing up to 3,170kg (7,000lb).
With its rear seat occupied by a weapon systems operator or mission manager, the EX could also over time see its use expanded from flying homeland defence missions in the USA to potentially operating in concert with so-called loyal wingman vehicles.
“It can easily be configured for manned-unmanned teaming, and we look forward to working with the air force to define this concept further,” Kumar says.
Following receipt of its initial eight EXs, Cirium data indicates the USAF’s subsequent 136 units would be transferred starting with 12 in 2024, rising to 16 a year between 2025 and 2030, and concluding with 14 each in 2031 and 2032. This would see the F-15 programme achieve a production run spanning 60 years.
Additional international orders could yet add to this backlog. Israel is currently eyeing a follow-on buy of Advanced F-15s, to bolster its I-model examples delivered between 1997 and 1999. Kumar says Boeing expects a letter of request for such an acquisition to emerge within the next year, with the nation also expected to request a modernisation programme for its in-service Is.
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Source: Israeli air force
Israel could upgrade its current F-15I inventory, and take 25 new aircraft

Upgrades could be made in areas such as incorporating the new cockpit layout and updated electronic warfare equipment, but could not introduce a FBW update to the legacy platforms.

Japan has already initiated a process to modify its in-service aircraft to an enhanced to JSI (Japan Super Interceptor) standard. Mitsubishi will act as prime contractor for the work, which will incorporate Boeing-supplied modification kits. Tokyo intends to have 98 of its current fighters updated as part of a broader modernisation plan worth $4.5 billion.
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Source: Boeing
Tokyo is to modernise current fighters to a ‘Japan Super Interceptor’ standard


Further new-build sales also remain a possibility. India is being considered as one potential future customer, although Boeing does not currently hold a marketing licence to promote the type to New Delhi. Kumar says the company will decide on its approach for the air force’s 110-aircraft requirement after a formal request for information is issued by the nation, with its F/A-18E/F Super Hornet being another potential candidate.

Beyond extending its production of the F-15 into the 2030s and providing a foundation for further export sales, the EX contract also will support

Boeing’s pursuit of the USAF’s future Digital Century Series requirement for rapidly evolving combat capability.

While its airframe design may date back to the 1960s, the technologies now being embodied with the digital-era F-15EX could indeed see the platform become a “pathfinder” for the USAF’s next generation of advanced fighters.
 
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