The Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques moved to the mercy of God tonight

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#3
~-~
So sad to hear about that...Words cannot express the sadness :(

To Allah we belong, and to Him we do return.

I ask Allah to bless his soul .

Deep sympathy & condolences to all Saudis and Muslims ..




Rest in Peace Dad....
 
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Abdullah became king in 2005 but had effectively been in charge since his brother Fahd’s stroke in 1995.


King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia has died aged 90 after a short illness, state television announced late on Thursday. He has been succeeded by Crown Prince Salman, his half-brother.

The news came after the king was admitted to hospital on 31 December suffering from pneumonia. His condition was said to have improved a few days later.

Rumours of the king’s death circulated on social media before Saudi TV began broadcasting Qur’anic verses – often a harbinger of bad news – and the announcement was made. He is to be buried on Friday afternoon.

Beyond confirmation
that Salman has ascended the throne lie troubling questions about the succession, the stability of an unreformed absolute monarchy and the prospects for its younger generation of royals at a time of turmoil in the region – including the destabilising crisis in Yemen.

Abdullah bin Abdulaziz – the king since 2005 and effectively in charge since his brother Fahd’s stroke in 1995 – accepted limited change after 2011 in response to the events of the Arab spring. Yet Saudi women are still unable to drive, citizens are unable to vote except in municipal elections and public beheading by sword remains a standard feature of the judicial system. Political parties are banned.

Salman is widely believed to be unwell, with speculation he is suffering from dementia or Parkinson’s disease, though Saudis deny that. He is 79, so there is bound to be uncertainty about his rule. Stability and continuity are likely to be his guiding principles, especially at a time of alarm over the rise of Isis in Iraq and Syria, turmoil in neighbouring Yemen, the kingdom’s rivalry with Iran and controversy over its resisting calls for Opec production cuts as the price of oil
has plummeted.

In recent months, Salman has begun to play
a more active role and has represented the country at important meetings abroad, including a high-octane Gulf summit. He also serves as deputy prime minister and defence minister.

Salman served as the governor of Riyadh province for years and enjoys a reputation for good governance. He acted as the family enforcer, discreetly settling problems with some of the thousands of royals who live in the capital. He was also active in collecting funds
to support the mujahideen who were encouraged to fight the Soviet Union in Afghanistan in the 1980s – Osama bin Laden was the most famous of them – and he worked closely with the Wahhabi clerical establishment.

Salman stands to be succeeded in turn by Prince Muqrin, 69, the deputy crown prince, an RAF-trained fighter pilot and former intelligence chief whose prospects are often questioned because he was born to a Yemeni rather than a Saudi mother of “approved” tribal lineage.

If Muqrin does come to the throne, he is likely to be the last of the sons of the founder of Saudi Arabia, King Abdulaziz (Ibn Saud), who died in 1953. That will be the end of an era for a family, the Al Saud, who literally gave their name to a wealthy but autocratic country that controls 20% of the world’s oil
reserves and dominates a strategic and volatile region.

Muqrin’s position was confirmed
last year by the 35-member allegiance council in a move designed by Abdullah to guarantee a smooth succession. But that manoeuvre apparently faced opposition from less prominent surviving sons of Ibn Saud, especially Prince Ahmed. That means there could still be an argument – something the Al Saud have tried hard to avoid.

“I don’t think they are crazy enough to have an internal conflict over the throne,” said a Saudi writer. “The lesson is whatever you do, you do it in private and you don’t let rivalries upset the stability of the family’s rule,” argues a former diplomat.

Bruce Reidel, a CIA veteran and now a Brookings Institution expert, said: “If and when Muqrin ascends to the position of crown prince, the kingdom will face the unprecedented challenge of picking a next in line from the grandsons of Ibn Saud. That will raise questions of legitimacy not faced in the last century of Saudi rule.”

Predicting events inside this large and secretive clan is notoriously difficult and often described as a sort of Arabian version of Cold War-era Kremlinology. But one
clear possibility is that younger royals will demand a greater role. Abdullah’s sons, Prince Mitab, head of the National Guard, and Prince Mishaal, governor of Mecca: both mistrust Crown Prince Salman and his “Sudairi” wing of the family, named after one
of Ibn Saud’s favourite wives. Mohammed bin Nayef, the interior minister and son of the late Crown Prince Nayef, is another highly regarded figure of the same generation who is also much admired in the west.

Maintaining the family consensus will get harder the closer the younger generation get to power, experts argue.

Another issue for Salman will be managing Saudi relations with the US, the source of disappointment in Riyadh and impetuous moves by Abdullah in the last year after President Barack Obama sought to negotiate a nuclear deal
and a wider rapprochement with Iran as well as failing to act militarily against the Syrian president, Bashar al-Assad, whose overthrow the Saudis are still seeking.

Saudi participation
in Obama’s anti-Isis coalition may have helped ease tensions.

The Saudis – the king’s formal title is “guardian of the two holy places” (of Mecca and Medina) – bill themselves as the leaders of the Sunni Muslim world, a role that has taken on increased significance in the face of the jihadi threat and the atmosphere of sectarianism across the region.
 
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#5
Its a shame, King Abdullah was one of the most liberal monarchs Saudi Arabia has ever seen and I think it was only a matter of time before we saw even more social reforms that gave woman more rights. Sadly I don't see that happening under Salman who has often said that reforms cannot or should not be undertaken.
 
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#6
Its a shame, King Abdullah was one of the most liberal monarchs Saudi Arabia has ever seen and I think it was only a matter of time before we saw even more social reforms that gave woman more rights. Sadly I don't see that happening under Salman who has often said that reforms cannot or should not be undertaken.

God bless you great Abdullah ! You were one of the greatest king, the best and the best ! ~-~ :,(


@ kittyworker Don’t worry ! ! ! <!?!>

Salman is very very very sick, he is unable to lead the country. The real king is Muqrin like Abdullah in 1995.



Prince Muqrin meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama in 2010 Nuclear Security Summit.


Muqrin bin Abdulaziz is considered to be one of the King Abdullah's long-time allies and a ‘liberal’ pure strain like King Abdullah.

Education :

Prince Muqrin studied at the Riyadh Model Institute. He, then, went to Britain's RAF College in Cranwell and graduated with a degree in aeronautics at the rank of flight lieutenant in 1968.He also received a diploma, equivalent to a master's degree, from the General Staff course in the US in 1974.

Career :

Muqrin bin Abdulaziz was an air force pilot. In 1964, he joined the Saudi royal air force (RSAF). He was named commander of the RSAF's 2nd air squadron in 1970. He had served in several positions in the RSAF from 1973 to 1977 before being appointed the adjutant to the director of air operations. He then was elevated to president of operations and planning for the RSAF.



Quote 1 :

Saudi king appoints half brother as heir to throne

POSTED: 28 mars 2014 04:03

Saudi Arabia's 90-year-old King Abdullah on Thursday appointed his half-brother Moqren, 69, as the next heir to the throne of the world's largest exporter of crude oil.

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia's 90-year-old King Abdullah on Thursday appointed his half-brother Moqren, 69, as the next heir to the throne of the world's largest exporter of crude oil.

The decision, announced in a royal decree, comes as a source close to the circle of power told AFP that current Crown Prince Salman, 79, was sick and "may decide not to claim the throne" because of his ill health.

The decree did not mention Prince Salman, who is also defence minister of the strategic Gulf state.

Under the rules of succession in Saudi Arabia, power passes from brother to brother under the right of primogeniture among the sons of Abdul Aziz bin Saud, the kingdom's founder.

The king made public his decision on the eve of a visit by US President Barack Obama, who is expected in Riyadh late on Friday afternoon.

Under Thursday's decree, Prince Moqren, currently second deputy prime minister, is named the next crown prince.

Prince Moqren will be proclaimed sovereign "if the posts of crown prince and king become vacant," according to the decision taken by "more than three-quarters" of the 34-member Board of Succession, the princes of the royal family.

The decision is irrevocable, the decree said, stipulating that "nobody can change this decision" which takes effect from Thursday.

"King Abdullah wants to assure a smooth succession by this internal reorganisation of power" within the family, another source told AFP, adding that the decision had been "taken in agreement with Crown Prince Salman".

"It was passed by 27 of the 34 members. Others had reservations or abstained in the vote," the source said, speaking on condition of anonymity and without elaborating.

The Board of Succession is supposed to designate the future heir.

A source close to royal circles in Riyadh told AFP King Abdullah had met the board and asked it to approve his decision to appoint Moqren crown prince "in case of the accession to the throne of Crown Prince Salman, or his absence."

The same source said the king also informed the board of his intention to appoint his son Mitab as second deputy premier.

In addition to that post, Moqren also headed the kingdom's intelligence services until July 2012.

"About two-thirds of the board members approved" the appointment of Mitab, according to the same source.

He added that Prince Salman asked that support be given to his son, Prince Mohammed, to be appointed to the defence portfolio.

King Abdullah established the board in 2006 to institutionalise the process of transition, which would normally exercise its prerogatives after the monarch's death.

Analysts believe that the ageing Al-Saud dynasty should consider moving to the next generation within the ruling family for the succession.


Channel NewsAsia



See Link : Allegiance Council


...

Quote 2 :

Same-Day Analysis

New appointment clarifies line of succession in Saudi Arabia

Published: 2/4/2013

The appointment of Prince Muqrin bin Abdulaziz al-Saud as second deputy prime minister provides further clarification to the order of succession in Saudi Arabia.


IHS Global Insight perspective

Significance : King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud appointed his half-brother Prince Muqrin bin Abdulaziz al-Saud second deputy prime minister on Friday (1 February) – the unofficial second in line to the throne.


Implications :
Prince Muqrin's promotion brings to a close speculation that the king may seek to transfer power to the following third generation in the near future. Given the health concerns surrounding both the king and crown prince, Prince Muqrin will be called upon to govern the kingdom should both be absent through illness in the near future.

Outlook : Third generation Saudi royals will continue to gradually be afforded more power, but the pace of the transition will not be rushed.


Prince Muqrin bin Abdulaziz al-Saud was appointed second deputy prime minister on Friday (1 February). The position marks the unofficial second in line for the throne and has been vacant since October 2011, when the former incumbent, Prince Nayef bin Abdulaziz al-Saud, was appointed crown prince. King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud issued a royal decree on Friday appointing Prince Muqrin, who was then sworn in to office in Riyadh yesterday (3 February).

Unexpected developments

The elevation of Prince Muqrin took most observers by surprise. Nevertheless, it appears a pragmatic appointment. As one of the youngest remaining sons of the founder of the modern Saudi state, King Ibn Saud, the 67-year-old prince is believed to be untroubled by the health issues that blight his eldest brothers' days; both the king and Crown Prince Salman bin Abdulaziz al-Saud are unable to work for lengthy periods. Furthermore, he has a wealth of experience in the higher echelons of the kingdom's political apparatus. He served for nearly twenty years as the governor of Hail province, before being elevated to the more prestigious governorship of Medina province in 1999. In 2005, he was named director for general intelligence, heading up the General Intelligence Presidency (GIP). During this period, the intelligence and security services waged a successful battle against internal Islamist militants.

Despite this pedigree, Prince Muqrin's removal from the GIP in July 2012 appeared to damage his promotion prospects (see Saudi Arabia: 23 July 2012: Former Ambassador to US Appointed Saudi Intelligence Chief). Although he had attracted plaudits for his role in expelling Islamist militants from the country, Prince Muqrin was increasingly criticised in public by Saudi citizens prior to his departure, which had all the appearances of an ignominious dismissal. In the light of the latest developments however, the seemingly token advisory position to the king he was awarded appears to have been more influential than was believed.

At 67, Prince Muqrin largely bridges the gap between the remaining sons of Ibn Saud and his most prominent grandchildren. The most likely members of that cohort to challenge for the leadership include Interior Minister Prince Mohammed bin Nayef al-Saud, and the head of the Saudi Arabian National Guard (SANG), Prince Miteb bin Abdullah al-Saud – who are aged 53 and 60, respectively. Arguably the most important task of his rule will be to complete the process, largely initiated by King Abdullah, of bringing these individuals through into positions of greater authority and ensuring that there exists a stable transitional path.

Stability over all

This appointment clearly emphasises one thing above all else; the value placed on stability by King Abdullah. Although he has made great strides in promoting third generation royals during the last 12 months, the time has not yet come for one to assume the ruling mantle. Although cognisant of the imperative need to inject relative youth and vitality into Saudi Arabia's ruling clique, this does not yet extend to the very highest levels. In this most-conservative of kingdoms, many of the remaining sons of Ibn Saud are not prepared to accept being overlooked for one of their nephews.

Crucially Prince Muqrin's elevation allays concerns over the uncertainty surrounding succession in the kingdom. Serious concerns exist over King Abdullah's health, and rumours surrounding the extent of this were ever-present when he underwent surgery last year (see Saudi Arabia: 30 August 2012: Recently Appointed Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Temporarily Running Kingdom). Crown Prince Salman fares little better. It is not beyond the bounds of imagination that sometime in 2013 both will be incapacitated over health issues, in which case, Prince Muqrin will step in to temporarily run the kingdom.

Prior to Friday's announcement, under the worst case scenario, both King Abdullah and Crown Prince Salman could have died before the end of 2013 with no appointed successor – resulting in a potentially destabilising scramble for power by the potential heirs. This scenario has been avoided. Although the Allegiance Council established by King Abdullah in 2006 was designed to facilitate the succession process, it has subsequently been sidelined and played no role in the appointment of the two previous crown princes. Furthermore, the vested interests of its members ensure that it is inherently flawed, and it remains uncertain that it will even survive beyond Abdullah's reign. It is unlikely to have been capable of smoothly resolving such a crisis.

What should not be overlooked is that none of Prince Muqrin's sons are sufficiently high profile to be regarded as potential future monarchs. As a neutral arbiter, his choice of successor is therefore likely to be meritocratic rather than tainted by accusations of patronage, increasing prospects for a smooth succession.

A respected operator

While many diplomats in the west may secretly have harboured hopes that Saudi Arabia would accelerate the transition to the next generation, they will not be dismayed by the prospects of dealing with a future King Muqrin. His experience of the West formed by studying at RAF Cranwell in the United Kingdom will certainly reassure many. He is well regarded as a capable operator – despite this being somewhat tarnished by the last part of his stint heading the GIP.

Although more circumspect than some of his siblings in displaying his views, he is a relatively liberal figure. As with his brothers, he is intrinsically suspicious of neighbouring Shia Iran, and overall he is likely to maintain a similar foreign policy agenda to his predecessors.

As the inevitable generational transition looms ever closer, one of Prince Muqrin's main challenges will be to balance the interests of his most ambitious nephews. To ensure internal stability, he will have to work closely with both Prince Miteb and Prince Mohammed bin-Nayef, who each control one of the key pillars of domestic security – the SANG and interior ministry respectively. Nevertheless, he will be wary that each will become increasingly entrenched in the coming years and may seek to use their respective power-bases to press their claims.

Outlook and implications

Although not officially guaranteeing Prince Muqrin's future ascension to the throne, his appointment as second deputy prime minister makes him the leading contender. King Abdullah previously held the position, as did the previous two crown princes. In the meantime, Prince Muqrin will assume an increasingly significant role in running the kingdom, stepping in for the ailing king and crown prince when they are absent or infirm. In the eventuality that he does become king, he is likely to be the last of Ibn Saud's sons to inherit the throne. Having been overlooked in favour of a younger sibling, none of his elder brothers are likely to be appointed his successor – such a decision would be unprecedented in the kingdom.

The most important aspect of the appointment was that it was made at all, rather than who was appointed. From the prospect of a potentially destabilising succession crisis in the near future, Saudi Arabia has bought itself a few more years of regime stability. Prince Muqrin's task will be to steady the ship and ensure that the next generational transition progresses as smoothly.


IHS


...
https://world-defense.com/members/kittyworker.106/
 

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Sad news to all of us. I pray for stability and prosperity to Saudi Arabia and its people.
 

Scorpion

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What a big loss. :,(
 

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My deepest condolences to the Saudi people, to the Arab and Muslim world as well.

May almighty bestow his mercy and blessing upon King Abdullah. May he rest in peace. Amen.
 

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UAE President condoles death of Saudi king, announces three-day mourning

'We mourn the death of one of the most notable leaders of the Arab Nation and Muslim Nation,' says Khalifa



ABU DHABI: President His Highness Shaikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan has mourned the death of the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah Bin Abdulaziz of Saudi Arabia who passed away before dawn on Friday. He prayed to Allah Almighty to bless the soul of the late king with mercy in Paradise.

President Khalifa said, “We mourn the death of one of the most notable leaders of the Arab Nation and Muslim Nation who generously gave a lot to his people and his nation and sincerely defended the causes of the Arab Nation and the Muslim Nation.

As we express our sincere condolences to the Saudi royal family and the people of the sisterly Kingdom of Saudi Arabia on the death of the great late king, Abdullah Bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, we express our full confidence that King Salman Bin Abdulaziz Al Saud and the Crown Prince Muqrin Bin Abdulaziz Al Saud will continue his blessed march serving the causes of the nation and advance the Arab joint action.”

Shaikh Khalifa praised the late king for being dedicated himself to the service of his people and nation and worked on bolstering cohesion of the Arab Nation.

He emphasised that with the death of the late king, for the Arab Nation and the Muslim Nation, was a loss of a great figure who never hesitated to serve the causes of his nation until the end of his life.

Shaikh Khalifa ordered a three-day mourning, starting from Friday, and that the UAE national flag will be flown at half-mast at all government departments in the UAE and at all embassies and diplomatic missions of the UAE overseas.
 

Scorpion

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I cant imagine for a second that he passed away. :,(
 
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My Friend, Don't listen to that bullshit .:-E

I don't expect such that behavior from our brothers in Palestine .

I think it's an old video, uploaded before few hours to spread trolls between the Saudi -Palestinian sides.

Even if it's true, what they'll gain ?

Does that will liberate Al-Aqsa ? Of course not .

The actual celebrations done by Shia's ,Raafids .. and other Islam enemies .

However, I saw the Shia's celebrations :D they're so funny and pathetic at the same time .
I didn't expect that we've this amount of power ! They were afraid from one person although he was soooo kind and merciful !
What they'll do with KING SALMAN now .|O|
 

BLACKEAGLE

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May Allah bless your gentle soul. Rest in peace.
 
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I was really sorry to hear about the passing of King Abdullah, I liked him. He did a lot for women in Saudi Arabia and recognized that things needed to progress. We haven't heard much about Prince Muqrin in the UK, only that Salman will now be King, so I was very interested to read about him. Condolences to all of King Abdullah's subjects and I wish continuing prosperity upon the Saudi nation.
 
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