US Cities development projects | Page 3 | World Defense

US Cities development projects

LAFD

Professional
Joined
Oct 15, 2015
Messages
888
Reactions
2 1,511 12
Country
Germany
Location
USA
Portland, Maine: the Rock Row is a transformative 110 acre mixed used development. Rock Row will include healthy urban living, destination retail, modern workplaces, select and full service hotels, diverse entertainment & restaurants
RR.jpg
 

LAFD

Professional
Joined
Oct 15, 2015
Messages
888
Reactions
2 1,511 12
Country
Germany
Location
USA
Portland, Oregon: two soaring skyscrapers and an underground high speed transportation hub is planned in the city's "broadway corridor" The two towers will be mix use of retail, office, and residential and both towers will be connected by a glass-enclosed botanical bridge. part of the plan includes 4 other smaller residential towers, an indoor market, a museum and a block long reflecting pool.
A.jpg
 

LAFD

Professional
Joined
Oct 15, 2015
Messages
888
Reactions
2 1,511 12
Country
Germany
Location
USA
Fort Worth, TX (part of the Dallas-Forth Worth metro area): The Panther Island development is to help protect Fort Worth's downtown from the Trinity River floods and will redirect the flood waters to low lying areas. the project will cost $1.16 billion USD which will include:
-12 miles waterfront consisting of river promenade riverwalk system
-30 acre town lake as a center piece
-ferry boats will move visitors between downtown to the cultural districts
-10,000 housing units
-commercial, retail and educational space
-tourist attractions: kayaking, public beach, paddle boats, tubing
P.jpg
 

Lieutenant

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Nov 25, 2014
Messages
1,837
Reactions
15 2,124 25
New York City's Central Park Tower will be the tallest residential structure in the world standing at 1,550 feet or 472 meters. The Tower will include:
-179 Condos
-a luxury penthouse with 4 bedrooms + an outdoor swimming pool, cabanas, bar and food & beverage service
-16th floor will include : health & wellness center, 63 foot indoor swimming pool, fitness center, basketball court, sauna, and treatment rooms
View attachment 12043
Skyscrapers are no where to be found in the US except those built in 1970s & 1980s. An average man with an average wage can not afford to live in one.
 

LAFD

Professional
Joined
Oct 15, 2015
Messages
888
Reactions
2 1,511 12
Country
Germany
Location
USA
Skyscrapers are no where to be found in the US except those built in 1970s & 1980s. An average man with an average wage can not afford to live in one.
Central Park Tower is mostly for the rich, in New York City Central Park residential areas are owned by really wealthy people. however, this will mostly counter as a "tourist attraction" New York City is currently desperate to stay as the US's lead tourist city. for example, Dallas currently has a park project which will be 2x or 3x times the size of central park and was blocked until recently, with private citizens across Texas sponsoring it's development.
 

LAFD

Professional
Joined
Oct 15, 2015
Messages
888
Reactions
2 1,511 12
Country
Germany
Location
USA
Dallas: Valley View Project, is a master plan to redevelop the Valley View Mall. the project will cost $2.5 billion USD. The new redevelopment project will include :
-1 new mall
-2 hotels
-fitness center
-movie theatre
-apartment community
-large park in the center
1.jpg
 

LAFD

Professional
Joined
Oct 15, 2015
Messages
888
Reactions
2 1,511 12
Country
Germany
Location
USA
Los Angeles: Union Station master plan is a project of the union station which will include a multi-modal concourse a relocated bus plaza & and a potential high speed rail station.
TH.jpg
 

LAFD

Professional
Joined
Oct 15, 2015
Messages
888
Reactions
2 1,511 12
Country
Germany
Location
USA
San Diego, California: Navy Boardwalk project. it will include a 17 story skyscraper, 1,100 room hotel, 372,000 square foot navy HQ and restaurants

A.jpg
 

LAFD

Professional
Joined
Oct 15, 2015
Messages
888
Reactions
2 1,511 12
Country
Germany
Location
USA
Chicago will be home to the first floating eco-park in the US. The Park will include educational and recreational purposes for the city.

Chicago.jpg
 

LAFD

Professional
Joined
Oct 15, 2015
Messages
888
Reactions
2 1,511 12
Country
Germany
Location
USA
Hidden in the haze of the petrochemical plants and beyond the seemingly endless traffic jams, a Texas city has grown so large that it is poised to pass Chicago as the third biggest in the US in the next decade.
Houston has been one of the fastest-growing US cities for years, fueled by an energy industry that provided the backbone of the economy, low taxes, and prospects of employment that have attracted job seekers.

But Houston also embodies the new, urban Texas, where political views have been drifting to the left, diversity is being embraced, and newer residents are just as likely to drive a hybrid as a pickup truck.
Houston's move is also indicative of demographic shifts unfolding in the US that will increase the population and political clout of the Lone Star State over the next several decades.
Within eight to 10 years, Houston is forecast by demographers in the two states to pass Chicago, which has seen its population decline for years, as the third-largest city.
Houston is projected to have a population of 2.54 million to 2.7 million by 2025, while Chicago will be at 2.5 million, according to official data from both states provided for their health departments. New York and Los Angeles are safe at Nos. 1 and 2 respectively.

Houston has long been associated with the risk takers in the oil industry and more recently as one of the better cities to find a job.
"Texas has a long tradition, and Houston has it in spades, that we are not so much interested in where you are from. We want to know what you can do," Mayor Annise Parker of Houston said in an interview with Reuters.
Chicago officials were not immediately available for comment.
Apart from domestic migration, about one in five Houstonians is foreign born, and more than 90 languages are spoken in the city.
"We have that international mindset that the rest of the United States never saw," said Parker, a former oil executive and city controller who has a collection of urban achievement awards and rodeo belt buckles in her office.
On Houston's fringes are petrochemical plants that fuel the economy, the space agency NASA that attracts aerospace jobs, and a port that handles more foreign tonnage than any other in the US.
In between is a mass of relatively unplanned urban sprawl, strip malls, ethnic enclaves, trendy restaurants, and burgeoning green spaces lying under an umbrella of oppressive heat that lasts more than half the year. The energy industry, which accounts for about 40% of Houston's economy, has sent the fortunes of the city on a roller-coaster ride for decades.
Hidden in the haze of the petrochemical plants and beyond the seemingly endless traffic jams, a Texas city has grown so large that it is poised to pass Chicago as the third biggest in the US in the next decade.
Houston has been one of the fastest-growing US cities for years, fueled by an energy industry that provided the backbone of the economy, low taxes, and prospects of employment that have attracted job seekers.



But Houston also embodies the new, urban Texas, where political views have been drifting to the left, diversity is being embraced, and newer residents are just as likely to drive a hybrid as a pickup truck.
Houston's move is also indicative of demographic shifts unfolding in the US that will increase the population and political clout of the Lone Star State over the next several decades.
Within eight to 10 years, Houston is forecast by demographers in the two states to pass Chicago, which has seen its population decline for years, as the third-largest city.
Houston is projected to have a population of 2.54 million to 2.7 million by 2025, while Chicago will be at 2.5 million, according to official data from both states provided for their health departments. New York and Los Angeles are safe at Nos. 1 and 2 respectively.



Houston has long been associated with the risk takers in the oil industry and more recently as one of the better cities to find a job.
"Texas has a long tradition, and Houston has it in spades, that we are not so much interested in where you are from. We want to know what you can do," Mayor Annise Parker of Houston said in an interview with Reuters.
Chicago officials were not immediately available for comment.
Apart from domestic migration, about one in five Houstonians is foreign born, and more than 90 languages are spoken in the city.



"We have that international mindset that the rest of the United States never saw," said Parker, a former oil executive and city controller who has a collection of urban achievement awards and rodeo belt buckles in her office.
On Houston's fringes are petrochemical plants that fuel the economy, the space agency NASA that attracts aerospace jobs, and a port that handles more foreign tonnage than any other in the US.
In between is a mass of relatively unplanned urban sprawl, strip malls, ethnic enclaves, trendy restaurants, and burgeoning green spaces lying under an umbrella of oppressive heat that lasts more than half the year.

With oil priced at around $45 a barrel, the brakes have been slammed on job growth, and a slight chill has entered the booming construction sector.
Since 1969, Houston has been one of the most successful major US cities in terms of per-capita personal-income growth. Since about 2003, about 650,000 jobs have been created in the Houston area, according to the University of Houston.
The Houston-area unemployment rate has remained below the national average for years, according to government data, while the Chicago-area has recently been above it.
Houston's growth, however, coming with few zoning restrictions and a loose regulatory system in Texas, has led to persistent problems in air quality and traffic congestion.
 

Yıldırım

MEMBER
Joined
Aug 28, 2016
Messages
492
Reactions
1 815 2
Country
Turkey
Location
Azerbaijan
if Houston's economy rely on 40% from the oil industry, how come can they grow to be such a size? Monopolizing on 1 basic industry will sometimes, slow and prevent from truth economic growth.
 

LAFD

Professional
Joined
Oct 15, 2015
Messages
888
Reactions
2 1,511 12
Country
Germany
Location
USA
if Houston's economy rely on 40% from the oil industry, how come can they grow to be such a size? Monopolizing on 1 basic industry will sometimes, slow and prevent from truth economic growth.
Houston was in fact a fast growing community, constantly adding newer housing developments, bringing in new jobs etc. from 2003-2015, Houston was Texas's fastest growing city, however when Hurricane Harvey hit, the city slowed down + coronavirus pandemic, has significantly slowed the economy. and so far Houston has had 3 major oil companies file for bankruptcy which will hit their economy dramatically, since the Houston economy is based on around oil giants.

Houston lately been trying to annex the Woodlands (the woodlands is a "township") however Houston has been considering reaching an agreement to incorporate with the township since 2010, however they claim sometime between now-2021, it seems it will become Houston, but they also said that in 2018, so we need to wait and see. only reason Houston wants the woodlands, is simple (higher property taxes) ;) but also the township has troubles funding a lot city utilities (for example the fire department).

however, Houston's council has been saying they surpassed Chicago since 2015 (a lie) but it has grown by a million people since 2010 which is actually a dramatic increase, city had to increase the city limit for population to 2 million, however it seems they may increase it again. Houston has had troubles to bring in other jobs such as car manufacturing, more technology companies and so on, it's just some oil giants or smaller corporations moving in the area and that's it. they had a major chance to get a Tesla car manufacture facility in the area to build the Y-model and Cybertruck + building a solar panel farm and turbine farm, which would be significant but the city declined saying they don't have "room" (could of added it to Fort Bend County) but the deal fell through and went to Austin. Texas Tower, a new major skyscraper which was planned for the end of the year, beginning of 2021 has been halted and postponed until further notice (not the first time the city done this). Houston also has been losing it's population here and there for several reasons, which I'll list
~Harris County passed a 8% property tax increase (which includes Houston city), so if you make $140k a year, you pay $11,000 on property taxes. People are tired increase property taxes, when the county says it goes to build flood prevention projects, yet those projects never get started or finished.
~dependency on the oil: many local Houstonians are worried that one day, Houston will end up following a similar suit that happened to Detroit (relying too much on one industry) however, what many locals won't mention is the fact that they have tried bringing in other jobs mostly in the Culinary scene (foods) on the verge of surpassing San Francisco however still remaining behind New York. (many locals think BBQ will make them "surpass" everyone lol)
~rivalry with Austin: Austin and Houston have been following each other's footsteps in several cases, for example when Austin formed "silicon hill" or also known as "tech hill", Houston followed pursuit with "silicon Bayou", which seems to be a failure, only success is bringing in an Amazon warehouse and google server post.
~crime rate: Houston is the US's 3rd deadliest city (most Houstonians will completely ignore that, I don't know why either), a lot of people think that Chicago ranks the violence scene, which Chicago indeed has problems, but Houston is slowing becoming a "2nd Chicago" which some fear will surpass Chicago in a matter of a year or two. there is Katy, which is part of the greater area which is known as a "2nd greenspoint" which greenspoint in Houston, is known by local as "gunpoint" since the homicide, robbery rate is very high (always once or twice a day, and that's me being nice) Houston is also known for being a human trafficking hub, one of the worst in the country.
~corruption: Since Turner came into office multiple corruption cases rose, for example during Hurricane Harvey, he got state funds to help victims and rebuild the city, however that money went "missing" and some point that Turner put that in his pocket. he also hired a new intern which is making a $95k yearly salary, (not to be offensive, but people think Turner hired him for the fact he was just an immigrant, didn't have the qualified education) and the intern had some good connections since he knew councilman Larry Green, invited to a banquet for Houston's Texans football team owner Bob McNair by Turner. He also just asked for state loans to help fight COVID-19 throughout Houston, which people are questioning that even though it has not yet been approved.
~tourism: Houstonians claim to have the US's "best arts district" which is not true, Dallas has a larger Museum and arts district in Texas + US, and if you ask a local Houstonian what there is to do, most will say waterparks, parks, Museums, Nightclubs etc. not really sight-seeing places like NYC +Chicago have
~expensive: most Houstonians say it's cheap, well it's cheap depending on certain categories, but what they aren't telling people it's getting more expensive, some say will surpass NYC the way things keep going. housing is now slowing down, because Houston can't expand anymore because of other cities, so now Apartments, Studios and Houses are becoming expensive throughout Greater Houston, originally it was only limited to areas such as the Heights, Woodlands, Kingswood, Bellaire, West University. now it's growing, I've actually found it somewhat cheaper to live in Chicago then Houston tbh.
and the list goes on, Houston will need to make a major change in the following in order to keep people moving there if they want to surpass Chicago.
 

Yıldırım

MEMBER
Joined
Aug 28, 2016
Messages
492
Reactions
1 815 2
Country
Turkey
Location
Azerbaijan
which city do you overall think will surpass Chicago if possible, if Houston proves to incapable of proving that point? also what are your personal views of why you dislike Houston if you don't mind me asking?
 
Last edited:

LAFD

Professional
Joined
Oct 15, 2015
Messages
888
Reactions
2 1,511 12
Country
Germany
Location
USA
which city do you overall think will surpass Chicago if possible, if Houston proves to incapable of proving that point? also what are your personal views of why you dislike Houston if you don't mind me asking?
to answer your first your question, Dallas-Fort Worth Area very easily, in some aspects they say Dallas will before Houston at this rate. Dallas has already added, 1.3 million people into the area with another 1.3 being added in the next 5-9 years, possibly sooner. sorry to bust the Houstonian's pride but Dallas said they would surpass Houston by 2 million (Dallas would have 9 million, Houston at 7 million) by 2029 .
to answer your 2nd question here are the reasons I don't like Houston
~lack of tourism, the skyline isn't as spectacular
~Community is cocky, they claim to want to help out local businesses but are quick to throw them under the bus
~claims to have a diverse community that they support, but in fact most don't support their diverse "neighbors" again throwing them under the bus, and in some parts of Houston the diversity % has dropped because of that.
~the good ole' pride, having the attitude Texas and Texans are better then everyone else
 

Yıldırım

MEMBER
Joined
Aug 28, 2016
Messages
492
Reactions
1 815 2
Country
Turkey
Location
Azerbaijan
to answer your first your question, Dallas-Fort Worth Area very easily, in some aspects they say Dallas will before Houston at this rate. Dallas has already added, 1.3 million people into the area with another 1.3 being added in the next 5-9 years, possibly sooner. sorry to bust the Houstonian's pride but Dallas said they would surpass Houston by 2 million (Dallas would have 9 million, Houston at 7 million) by 2029 .
to answer your 2nd question here are the reasons I don't like Houston
~lack of tourism, the skyline isn't as spectacular
~Community is cocky, they claim to want to help out local businesses but are quick to throw them under the bus
~claims to have a diverse community that they support, but in fact most don't support their diverse "neighbors" again throwing them under the bus, and in some parts of Houston the diversity % has dropped because of that.
~the good ole' pride, having the attitude Texas and Texans are better then everyone else
what are some things that Houston has done to even remotely tried to move away from the oil industry if so? which city between Houston & Chicago have a better transportation?
 
Last edited:
Top