Anti Ship Missiles Discussion, news, and technical details thread | Page 2 | World Defense

Anti Ship Missiles Discussion, news, and technical details thread

Shaheen

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Raytheon (General Dynamics) RIM-67Standard ER

Yes, the Standard is an anti-ship missile too!!! It's AShM capacity was first demonstrated during Operation Preying Mantis.

Specifications
Note:
Data given by several sources show slight variations. Figures given below may therefore be inaccurate!

Data for RIM-67A/C, except where noted:

RIM-67A SM-1ER RIM-67C SM-2ER
Length (incl. booster) 7.98 m (26 ft 2 in)
Finspan 1.07 m (42.3 in); booster: 1.57 m (62 in)
Diameter 0.34 m (13.5 in); booster: 0.45 m (18 in)
Weight 1340 kg (2960 lb)
Speed Mach 2.5 Mach 3.5
Ceiling > 24400 m (80000 ft)
Range 65 km (35 nm) 185 km (100 nm)
Propulsion Atlantic Research Corp. MK 30 solid-rocket sustainer
RIM-67A: Hercules MK 12 solid-rocket booster; RIM-67C: Hercules MK 70 solid-rocket booster
Warhead MK 51 continuous-rod MK 115 blast-fragmentation
1511352550546.png

The Standard missile program was initiated in 1963 to provide a replacement for the RIM-2 Terrier and RIM-24Tartar missile systems. The Tartar replacement was designated RIM-66 Standard MR(Medium Range), while the longer-range Terrier replacement became the RIM-67 Standard ER (Extended Range). The Standard is still the U.S. Navy's main medium and long range air defense missile.

All blocks of the Standard SM-1ER missile were designated as RIM-67A. They were essentially identical to the corresponding SM-1MR missile, except for the propulsion. Instead of the MR's MK-56 dual-thrust motor, the ER used an Atlantic Research Corp. MK 30 solid-fuel rocket sustainer motor, and a Hercules MK 12 booster.

The main improvements of the SM-2MR Block I/II/III missiles were also included in the corresponding SM-2ER versions, the major new features being the inertial guidance system, and the monopulse seeker for terminal homing. However, SM-2ER is not designed to be fired from Aegis ships. The SM-2ER Block I was designated RIM-67B, and entered service in 1980.

The RIM-67C SM-2ER Block II introduced a new MK 70 booster (regrained MK 12), which almost doubled the range of the SM-2ER. Interestingly, the enhanced booster extended the performance envelope of the RIM-67C well beyond the limits of the then current fire-control system on Terrier ships, but it did of course improve general missile performance against high-performance targets.

The RIM-67D SM-2ER Block III had a new model of the sustainer engine (MK 30 MOD 4), and an improved MK 45 MOD 8 TDD (Target Detecting Device).

The SM-2ER Block IV is a version with a completely new finless booster, designed for vertical launch on Aegis/VLS ships. Although this has been reported to be designated RIM-67E, the correct designation is RIM-156A, q.v.

In the 1980's the U.S. Navy planned a nuclear-armed version of the Standard SM-2ER, because the last nuclear armed surface-to-air missiles, the RIM-2D Terrier and RIM-8E/G/J Talos, were about to be retired, leaving the Navy without a nuclear anti-air warfare capability. The nuclear SM-2 was to be equipped with a W-81 fission warhead (4 kT yield). However, these plans have since been dropped, and the U.S. Navy has currently no nuclear-armed SAMs.

In 1995, Hughes (now Raytheon) proposed to convert obsolete RIM-2 Terrier missiles, of which more than 2000 were in storage, to supersonic low-altitude target (SLAT) configuration as a replacement of and/or successor to the MQM-8 Vandal. At 10 m altitude, range would have been 40 km (22 nm) with the MK 30 motor, or 64 km (35 nm) with the new MK 104 dual-thrust motor. As a ballistic missile target, maximum altitude and range could be 85 km (280000 ft) and 275 km (150 nm), respectively (168 km/550 km with MK 104 motor). The designation YRQM-67A was reserved for protoype conversions, but the Terrier conversion plan was eventually dropped. However, Raytheon has converted many surplus SM-2ER rounds (mostly RIM-67C) to TMT (Terrier Missile Target) configuration to serve as ballistic missile targets. Although I don't have firm evidence, these targets are probably designated RQM-67A.
 

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Kh-41 Moskit
SS-N-22 Sunburn

Soviet/Russian Cruise Missiles
Type Anti-ship missile
Place of origin Soviet Union
Manufacturer MKB Raduga
Weight kg 4,500 kg (9,900 lb)
Length 9.745 m (31.97 ft)
Diameter 0.8 m (2.6 ft)
Warhead 320 kg (710 lb) explosive or 120 ktof TNT fission-fusionthermonuclear
Engine Four ramjets (solid fuel rocket on air-to-surface version)
Wingspan 2.10 m (6.9 ft)
Operational range
120 km (75 mi)
Flight altitude 20 m (66 ft) above sea le vel
Speed Mach 3
Guidance system
active radar
Launch platform
naval ships, fixed-wing aircraft

The Raduga 3M80, 3M82 and Kh-41 Moskit / SS-N-22 Sunburn are all variants of the same 4.5 tonne supersonic rocket-ramjet missile. This weapon is the primary armament of the PLA-N's new 956E Sovremennyy class destroyers and is credited with a range between 50 and 120 nautical miles.

More recently it has been integrated on the Project 12421 Molniya class missile boats, which carry four rounds.

An air launch centreline tunnel adaptor enables Su-27/30 family strike fighters to carry a single round and this configuration has been displayed on the navalised Su-33, and more recently advertised on the land based Su-35BM Flanker variants.

A coastal defence variant labelled the Moskit E is in development, with a two round TEL based on the MZKT-7930 chassis.

Inertial midcourse guidance is supplemented with an Altair active radar seeker - there are no reports to date of land attack derivatives. The missile is powered by a Turayevo 3D83 ramjet

Unlike subsonic Western anti-ship missiles such as the Harpoon and Exocet, the Moskit is a supersonic sea-skimmer. It can be programmed to fly a high altitude trajectory at Mach 3, or a sea-skimming trajectory at Mach 2.2. If the sea skimming mode is chosen, the missile will be first detected by a warship under attack when it emerges over the horizon at a distance of about 15 to 25 nautical miles. This provides the defences on the ship with about 25-60 seconds of warning time before impact. The raw speed of the Moskit makes it a challenging target for most shipboard defences. All variants use the KTRV-Detal 3A-81E-01 series radar altimeter, similar to the design used in the Kh-59ME / AS-18 Kazoo.

Terminal phase approach to targets is at 10 - 20 m AMSL.

Manufacturer datasheets state the following capabilities for the Moskit E system:
  • Ability to engage surface targets including warships, transports and ACVs with speeds of up to 100 knots.
  • Ability to engage targets at sea states of up to 6, and low signature targets at states of up to 5.
  • Wind speeds of up to 20 m/s.
  • The fire control system performs automatic test of missiles pre-launch, and can manage and allocate missiles for up to 4 targets.
  • The missile launch tubes can be deployed on a vessel for up to 18 months without servicing.
  • The 3M-80E and 3M-80E1 missile seeker has active radar and passive anti-radiation homing capability [likely band limited by antenna design].
The most recent variant is the improved Moskit MVE system:
  • Ability to fly pre-programmed composite profiles comprising high and low altitude segments.
  • Range on a low altitude profile of up to 140 km.
  • Range on a composite flight profile of to 240 km.
  • 1511352675481.png
 

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LRASM (Long Range Anti-Ship Missile)

Type Cruise missile (anti-ship)
Place of origin United States
Service history
In service
2018 (planned)
Used by U.S. Navy
Manufacturer Lockheed Martin
Specifications
Warhead
1,000 lb blast-fragmentation penetrator
Operational range
500 nmi (930 km)
Speed supersonic
Launch platform
Mk 41 Vertical Launch System(VLS)
F/A-18E/F Super Hornet
F-35 Lightning II
B-1B Lancer
mfc-lrasm-pr-photo-side-h.jpg


Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) - Naval Technology

The Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) is an autonomous, precision-guided anti-ship stand-off missile. The LRASM is being developed by Lockheed Martin in collaboration with the US Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) and Office of Naval Research (ONR).

The missile is developed based on JASSM-ER (Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile-Extended Range). The proposed LRASM is to be offered for the US Navy and the US Air Force war fighters.

The engineering design and development contract of the LRASM programme was awarded to Lockheed Martin. The first phase of the development was completed successfully and second phase is currently in progress.

Lockheed Martin, on behalf of DARPA, is preparing to conduct flight tests on the LRASM in 2013 and 2014. The LRASM is expected to enter into serial production in 2015.

Long Range Anti-Ship Missile development
The LRASM development programme was jointly initiated in 2008, by the DARPA and ONR, to penetrate more sophisticated air defence systems of enemies from long range.

The development programme is planned in two phases; the study and design phase (phase one), and the demonstration phase (phase two). The nine month first phase of the project includes the complete concept development, primary design, cost estimation and analytical support for the development. The 27-month second phase covers detailed design, critical design review (CDR), material procurement, fabrication, integration and testing.

DARPA/ONR selected three contractors for the LRASM development programme. Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control Strike Weapons located in Orland was selected for LRASM-A prototype demonstration. BAE Systems, Information and Electronic Systems Integration, based in Nashua, was selected for the design and development of onboard sensor systems.

Each division of Lockheed Martin was awarded a $9.7m study contract by DARPA, for the design of the LRASM, in 2009.

Lockheed Martin was also awarded two demonstration phase contracts,totalling $218m, in January 2011. The first $60.3m contract received by the Lockheed Martin LRASM-A team involves the execution of two air-launched demonstrations, while the $157.7m second contract awarded to LRASM-B team includes four Vertical Launch System (VLS) demonstrations of LRASM for the US Navy.

Lockheed Martin conducted the first captive carry flight test of LRASM at various altitudes and speeds in July 2012. The flight test was conducted to find the LRASM's ability to detect, classify and recognise targets.

In March 2013, DARPA awarded a $71m modification contract to Lockheed Martin for conducting additional air-launched LRASM flight test from a B-1B Lancer. Under the contract, the company also provides risk reduction efforts to test the electromagnetic compatibility of the missile and follow-on captive carry sensor suite missions.

LRASM variants
The LRASM programme is initially focused on the development of two variants, the LRASM-A and LRASM-B. The LRASM-A was designed based on Joint Air to Surface Stand-off Missile Extended Range (JASSM-ER) airframe, and includes added sensors and systems. The LRASM-B was designed for high-altitude and supersonic speed over stealthy penetration. The LRASM-B development was, however, cancelled by DARPA in 2012.

Mark 41 Vertical Launch System compatibility
The LRASM is designed to be launched by Mark 41 Vertical Launch System aboard most of the US Navy vessels and fixed wing aircraft.

It can be fired from outside direct counter-fire ranges with maximum possibility of target hit. The missile can fulfil warfighter needs for anti-surface warfare (ASuW) weapon capability.

The LRASM is designed to carry a 1,000lb penetrating blast fragmentation warhead.

The self-directed sensing, advanced signature control and dynamic response features allow the missile to approach targets, while defeating air defence systems.

Guidance and navigation of the LRASM
The LRASM is equipped with a multimodal radio-frequency sensor suite for detecting targets. It includes a weapon data link for better communication with operators, and an improved digital anti-jam global positioning system to discover and destruct multiple specific targets.

An electro-optical seeker installed in the missile provides positive object recognition and accurate targeting during the terminal phase of flight.

The on-board targeting systems installed on the LRASM help the missile autonomously obtain the target without the support of prior, precision intelligence, or other supporting services.


B-1B-Drops-LRASM.jpg
 

Shaheen

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CM-400AKG
YJ-12 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
1511352946316.png


At the 9th Zhuhai Airshow, another hypersonic missile designated as CM-400AKG Wrecker made its debut in real form, though its photo had previously appeared at Paris Airshow. Developed by China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation (CASIC), the successor of several developers of YJ-12 after numerous reorganization, CM-400AKG Wrecker has reduced range of 180 to 250 km in order to meet the export restriction of Missile Technology Control Regime. The original western claims of CM-400AKG as a development of C-802/C-803 proved to be incorrect, because CM-400AKG is a derivative of YJ-12 instead, using solid rocket motor propulsion as opposed to the ramjet engine of YJ-12, and CM-400AKG is similar to YJ-12 in many aspects, such as the supersonic speed, and more importantly, exactly the same high-low flight path of first cruise at higher altitude and then the steep dive on the final approach.

The 400 kg CM-400AKG Wrecker is termed by CASIC as hypersonic since it can reach speed greater than Mach 5.5 at its terminal stage, and its guidance system includes GPS, onboard radar, and an image recognition system that can identify a specific target, it can also be pre-programed to destroy the ground targets with precision by uploading the digital imagery of the target or it can be re-targeted using its active radar seeker. Originally developed as an air-to-surface missile (ASM) against fixed and slow moving target, an anti-shipping missile (AShM) is also developed for Pakistan, which claims it as "an aircraft carrier killer". The two different CM-400AKG models can be easily distinguished by the difference between the arrangement of forward control surfaces of the two model: the AShM version has four short and smaller forward control surfaces, while the ASM version has four much larger forward control surfaces. Pakistan is the first export customer of CM-400AKG, deploying it on CAC/PAC JF-17 Thunder. AVIC gives ranges of 100-240km for the two versions with their 150kg blast warhead or 200kg penetration warhead.
1511352980549.png
 

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KSR-5
AS-6 Kingfish


AS-6 - Russian and Soviet Nuclear Forces
1511353099363.png

operational
with Badger 1970
with Backfire 1974
Type long-range cruise missile
Wingspan 2.5 - 2.61 m
Length 10.0 - 10.52 m
Diameter 0.9 m
Launch weight 3900-4800 kg
Max. speed 3200 - 3400 km/h
Ceiling 20000 m
Maximum range 240-700 km
Propulsion two stage solid propellant rocket motor
Guidance active radar or anti-radar seeker
Warhead proximity-, impact- or impact with delay-fuzed high-explosive, 1000 kg, or
nuclear, 350 kT yield 700 kg
Service CIS, Iraq

The AS-6 air-to-surface missile is a supersonic, liquid-rocket propelled, cruise missile weighing approximately 13,000 lb. It has an estimated maximum speed of Mach 3.5 at an altitude of 65,000 ft. and an estimated range of 300 nm. It can carry an 1100-lb conventional or nuclear warhead. For guidance it uses a preprogrammed autopilot for launch and climb, an inertial guidance system or an autopilot with radio command override for mid-course, and an active radar system for terminal dive when used in an antiship role. It has a CEP of 150 ft when used in the antiship role, and a CEP of 1 to 2 nm when employed against land targets. The AS-6 probably is a follow-on to the AS-2 and AS-5.

This is a smaller version of the Kh-22 missile, intended for Tu-16 bomber aircraft. Series production of the KSR-5 (Article D-5) anti-ship version with active-radar homing began in 1966. Target indication is given by either a "Rubin" radar of the Tu-16K-26 or a YeN radar of the Tu-16K-10-26. The KSR-SP antiradar missile entered service in 1972, at which time was also built the KSR-5N version with a nuclear load. On the basis of the KSR-5 was later built the KSR-5NM airborne target for training exercises. Modified Badger C and Badger G aircraft carry two AS-6 missiles. The Backfire may also have been an AS-6 carrier, but evidence is lacking to confirm this estimate. Production is estimated to have begun in 1969,with IOC in Badger aircraft in 1970. IOC with Backfire is estimated in 1974.

1511353128681.png

Tu-16 Badger carrying a KSR-6 (AS-6 Kingfish)
 

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P3T Sea Eagle
http://www.harpoondatabases.com/encyclopedia/Entry1163.aspx
1511353192744.png

Type: Aircraft-launched anti-ship missile
IOC/Retired: 1985/Still in service
Guidance: Strapdown inertial plus Plessey radar altimeter for the midcourse phase and Marconi active radar for the terminal phase
Warhead: 500 lb (226.8 kg) Royal Ordnance impact-fused semi-armor-piercing blast/fragmentation
Powerplant: One Microturbo TRI 60-1 Model 067 turbojet rated at 787 lb st (3.50 kN)
Dimensions: Diameter 1 ft 3.75 in (0.40 m); length 13 ft 7 in (4.14 m); span 3 ft 11.3 in (1.20 m)
Weight: Total round 1,325 lb (601 kg)
Performance: Speed more than 595 kt (685 mph; 1102 km/h); range 70 nm (81 miles; 130 km) from a high-altitude launch

The Sea Eagle was designed from 1976 as the P3T, and the structural and aerodynamic basis of the missile was found in the BAe/Matra Martel missile in service with the British and French air forces and the type to be replaced by the new weapon in the anti-ship role.

The origins of the type can be found in the Ministry of Defence’s 1973 Air Staff Target 1226, which demanded a weapon possessing considerably greater range than the AJ.168 version of the Martel. The P3T was therefore designed with an air-breathing powerplant in the form of a turbojet aspirated through a ventral inlet whose front was sealed from the airflow by a fairing discarded only after the missile’s release from its launch warplane. The missile is otherwise of ‘classic’ air-launched anti-ship missile configuration, with a cylindrical body terminating forward in the ogival radome for the antenna of the active radar terminal guidance package, a mid-set cruciform of cropped delta wings, and a close-coupled cruciform of cropped delta control fins mounted near the tail and indexed in line with the wings.

The Sea Eagle has a thoroughly modern guidance system, and data on the target's position, bearing, course and speed are loaded into this just before the Sea Eagle is launched. After release and engine ignition, the missile accelerates to Mach 0.85 and descends to sea-skimming height under control of its inertial guidance package with height data provided by a radar altimeter: the low-altitude cruise reduces the chances of the missile being spotted by electromagnetic or visual means. The active radar terminal guidance package is activated at a distance of 9.7 nm (11.2 miles; 18 km) from the target, and the missile then completes its attack.

The weapon is controlled via an advanced digital computer, and this allows varying attack heights, the flying of random evasive maneuvers in the closing stages of the attack, final attack from any bearing, the detection and ignoring of decoys and countermeasures, and on longer-range missions a short climb, when about 16.2 nm (18.6 miles; 30 km) from the target’s anticipated position, for use of the active radar to fix the missile’s position relative to the target before a descent once again to sea-skimming height.

The missile is notable for its good speed and range, and was planned mainly for warplane launch platforms such as the BAe Sea Harrier which can carry two missiles, and also the BAe Buccaneer and Panavia Tornado which can each carry four missiles.

The basic missile was also been developed as the Sea Eagle SL (P5T) surface-launched version for use by coastal batteries or warships, but this has not been ordered. This model is fitted with a pair of jettisonable solid-propellant booster rocket motors of the type developed to provide the missile with helicopter-launch capability for the Indian navy's Westland Sea King Mk 42s.

The Sea Eagle is operated by Chile, India, Saudi Arabia and the UK.
1511353226042.png
 

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Im not quite sure if anti ship missiles can be used against subs. I would be so grateful to you @Jon Snow if you can shed some light on the subject. I also would like to know how deep can an anti sub missile dive under water to hit the target. Would it pops up when it hits or at close radius?
Torpedoes, anti-sub rockets, and anti-sub mortars are used against subs.

@Jon Snow Can you open a new thread on anti sub warafre? Would appreciate it.
 

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PJ-10 Brahmos
BrahMos | Missile ThreatPJ-10 | Missile Threat

Possessed By: India, Russia
Alternate Name:PJ-10
Class: Supersonic
Basing:Ship/Ground/Air/Submarine-to-surface
Length:8.2 (SSM)/8.0 m (ASM)
Diameter:0.67 m
Launch Weight:3,000 kg (SSM), 2,200-2,500 kg (ASM)
Payload:300 kg (SSM), 200 kg (ASM)
Warhead:HE SAP or submunitions
Propulsion:Ramjet
Range:300 km (SSM), 500 km (ASM)
Status: Operational
In Service:2005

Su-30MKI with BrahMos
View attachment 4046

The BrahMos (PJ-10) is a short-range, ramjet powered, single warhead, supersonic anti-ship/land attack cruise missile developed and manufactured by India and Russia. Ship and ground-launched versions have been produced, and air and submarine-launched versions are under development. Due to its speed and accuracy, the BrahMos is considered one of the most formidable cruise missiles.

The BrahMos, which derives its name from the Brahmaputra and Moscow rivers in India and Russia, is based on the earlier Russian design for the SS-N-26 (3M55 Oniks/Yakhont/Bastion) cruise missile. In 1998, a joint venture was set up between the Indian Defense Ministry’s Defense Research and Development Organization and Russia’s Mashinostroyeniye Company. The two entities formed a company now known as Brahmos Aerospace, which would develop and manufacture the BrahMos PJ-10.

As an anti-ship missile, the BrahMos PJ-10 is distinguished by its reported supersonic speed of Mach 2.8, approximately one kilometer per second. In addition to making it difficult to intercept, this speed also imparts a greater strike power. In comparison, the U.S. RGM/UGM-109 “Tomahawk” cruise missile, which has been used successfully in both Iraq and Afghanistan, operates at a subsonic speed of less than Mach 1.0. Most other anti-ship missiles fly at subsonic speeds as well.

In addition, the BrahMos is equipped with stealth technology designed to make it less visible to radar and other detection methods. The missile also has a high level of accuracy, which has been reported as close as 1 to 5 m CEP. The missile operates on the “fire and forget” principle, meaning that once it has been launched, it will strike its target without requiring any assistance. It has an inertial navigation system (INS) for use against ship targets, and an INS/Global Positioning System for use against land targets. Terminal guidance is achieved through an active/passive radar.

The BrahMos is designed to attack surface targets at altitudes as low as 10 m. The ship and ground-launched versions have a range of 300 km, while the air-launched version has a range of 500 km. The missile is powered by a solid propellant boost motor with a liquid-fuelled ramjet sustainer motor. The ship and ground-launched version is 8.2 m in length, has a body diameter of 0.67 m, carries a 300 kg payload, and has a launch weight of 3,000 kg; the air-launched version is 8.0 m in length, has a diameter of 0.67 m, carries a 200 kg payload, and has a launch weight of 2,200 to 2,500 kg. Both versions have four clipped tip delta wings at mid-body, with four small delta control fins at the rear. The BrahMos carries either a 200 or 300 kg high explosive semi-armor-piercing warhead or a 250 kg submunitions warhead.

The first flight test of the BrahMos PJ-10 took place in June 2001. By April 2007, the missile had been tested at least fourteen times. The first eight tests were against ship targets and ended with the introduction of the missile into the Indian Navy in 2005. Several of the subsequent flights tested the missile against land-based targets and employed land-based launch platforms leading to the missile’s introduction in the Indian Army in 2007.


The missile entered production in 2004. Initial production was probably fairly slow with about 10 to 15 missiles produced per year. It is believed that by 2008 production numbers had increased to around 50 missiles per year. About 360 missiles are expected to be produced for domestic use. Some missiles will also probably be used by Russia. The BrahMos cooperation intends to export the missile rather widely. According to their webpage, they are creating an order book worth $13 billion in BrahMos sales.

BrahMos Ground-launched Variant

The land-based version utilizes the Tatra T816 12 x 12 chassis with a three canister system raised to launch at 45 degrees. The Indian Army adopted the land-based BrahMos in 2007.

BrahMos Air-launched Variant

Flight tests aboard the Su-30 MKI aircraft were scheduled for 2012 with an operational date of 2014/15, but the initial tests have been pushed back until December 2013. The delay is the result of a significantly different BrahMos design including reducing the launch weight by a half a ton, one booster to accelerate the missile instead of two, and modifications to the Su-30 aircraft.

BrahMos Submarine-launched Variant

The submarine-launched variant was expected to begin trials in 2009, but it was reported that there were no submarines available for testing. The first test was expected to occur in the fourth quarter of 2012, but it is unclear if this occurred. 1 The BrahMos submarine variant is launched vertically from a canister at a maximum depth of 40 to 50 m.

View attachment 4047
BrahMos one of my favourite. What did the name come from?
 

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Turkish ATMACA in comparison to Harpoon. Credits to Cem Devrim Yaylali.

Admiral Ahmet Cakir , Navy Technical Dept. Commander : First tests were done . Source : C4 defence

Technical data are similar to harpoon.
There is a submarine launched version in development which is said to be shot from a propelled capsule far away to hide submarine location.


1512928237795.png
 

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Turkish ATMACA in comparison to Harpoon. Credits to Cem Devrim Yaylali.

Admiral Ahmet Cakir , Navy Technical Dept. Commander : First tests were done . Source : C4 defence

Technical data are similar to harpoon.
There is a submarine launched version in development which is said to be shot from a propelled capsule far away to hide submarine location.


View attachment 4462
IMGP6764.jpg

UGM-84_Container.jpg
ugm-84_loading.jpg

UGM-84_diagram.jpg


The way a capsulated Harpoon UGM 84 works is that it is shot through a torpedo tube, with the canister. Once the canister breaches the surface of the water, the Harpoon fires up and shoots off, as in the following pic:
250px-Harpoon_launched_by_submarine.jpg


The Exocet works a bit more, it doesn't just clears the waters surface, but pops a few meter high, and then the missile is released. As you can see from the sequence shot.

SM39-highdetail.jpg


Exocet canister.JPG
 

Atalay

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propelled capsule far away to hide submarine
The technique I mentioned is a self propelled carrier capsule, to avoid rapid detection of the submarine.
On the other side Roketsan works for a super cavitation Akya variant torpedo.
 

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The technique I mentioned is a self propelled carrier capsule, to avoid rapid detection of the submarine.
On the other side Roketsan works for a super cavitation Akya variant torpedo.
Bro, see above, I mentioned 2 different methods of launching Missiles, both from a Sub via canisters, can you tell us which is more closer to Roketsan? Exocet or Harpoon?
 

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Bro. The problem is that I can only quote "Robust" you know him for sure also as serious source . He wrote that Roketsan is working on it, but Navy didn't ordered up to now. He mentioned an innovative self propelled programmable tube for Atmaca missile, as part of network warfare. If I would have more open source details I would post them. Both Harpoon and Exocet capsules aren't comparable.
Simple said : " Load data, eject, tube swims...km...waits until the ignition signal.
Host submarine will be far away. Let' say remote fired intelligent missile in an intelligent capsule."
 

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Bro. The problem is that I can only quote "Robust" you know him for sure also as serious source . He wrote that Roketsan is working on it, but Navy didn't ordered up to now. He mentioned an innovative self propelled programmable tube for Atmaca missile, as part of network warfare. If I would have more open source details I would post them. Both Harpoon and Exocet capsules aren't comparable.
Simple said : " Load data, eject, tube swims...km...waits until the ignition signal.
Host submarine will be far away. Let' say remote fired intelligent missile in an intelligent capsule."
I think what you are referring to, is a under water loitering weapon. Turkey doing this is no small achievement!
 
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