Iranian hand in attacks on Saudi Oil installations; a continued legacy of meddling in other countries | Page 3 | World Defense

Iranian hand in attacks on Saudi Oil installations; a continued legacy of meddling in other countries

BATMAN

MEMBER
Joined
Dec 20, 2017
Messages
614
Reactions
569 5
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Hybridwar... one vector you have found!

Now if/when you have time... please see ...quantify how many Trillions of PKR have been going to Persia .. for last 15 years....

We must stop being a colony of Persia and more importantly stop subsidising the PersianEmpire at the cost of our own childeren... healthcare and schools included.
Not only to Iran, but also to clergy in Iraq. At least they used to before US invasion. All of their remittance channels arr illegal.

BTW, it's not Persia but Iran,.... and there's nothing wrong in rich Persian culture, which was extended all the way to Kashgar China.
It's just that minority, full of hate and brain washed against imaginary enemies.
All what Imam need to do is to point at someone as their enemy and bingo, they all go on full cylinders against that person /entity.
Even an educated shiet of Pakistan would believe pure BS, if it's against KSA.
When they talk about Arabs and history, yo'll see, all they talk is elif laila. After 15 minutes of discussion on regional affairs, with old/young/liberal/conservative, you would sense that they all need serious rehabilitation.
Even if the news is playing in TV.... that some terrorist network is busted, who was trained in Iran, they would keep blaming Arabs and those who would question their open bias.
Imagine their Imams, who control their destiny, don't like to wear Pakistani dress but all of them keep living in denial.
 
Last edited:

BATMAN

MEMBER
Joined
Dec 20, 2017
Messages
614
Reactions
569 5
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Guess who the Shia political alliance supported in the 2018 elections???
Every one noticed all the vote bank of PPP disappeared in Punjab, while Imran Khan totally Ignoring Sindh... this was the reason Marvi Memon wan't allowed because she had some good ground work in Sindh and she could seriously divide PPP vote bank.
This is why, with all the treasonous history, Zardari still can walk free in Pakistan.
Our intel. agencies have forgotten about the changes Zardari made in foreign office and interior ministry, after assuming power.
He was part and parcel of what to come in Syria.... all what our intel. agencies need to do is collect embassy changes data and analyse it's aftermath, be it Mideast, Europe or Americas.
 
Last edited:

BATMAN

MEMBER
Joined
Dec 20, 2017
Messages
614
Reactions
569 5
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
No one knows so far, head of Saudi led- coalition said the drones and three cruise missiles came from the north. He did not specify where exactly but Saudi Air Force launched series air strikes on Syrian city of Al Bukamal last night. I don't think he will tell where about exactly.
Saudi Arabia and Pakistan are being surrounded and targeted by Americans and Iranians.
Both, US & Iran are playing the dirty hybrid war of terrorism and deception.
If you don't tell US to retaliate now, they will make sure Iran's missile and drone tech. get more sophisticated and they continue to smuggle that shit out of Iran, smoothly. While US can always go back and say ''didn't we seek your permission to retaliate''
Why do they need permission, against already declared terrorist army? They better ask people of Iran... and they know the answer will be swift Yes.
If you say yes, than they both will press propaganda, using all their resources.
In give circumstances, i think KSA better ask US, why they felt the need to talk to an ally state, about a strategic issue, over public media?
 
Last edited:

I.R.A

MEMBER
Joined
Nov 21, 2017
Messages
665
Reactions
1,342 75
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Attack on Saudi oil facilities is an attack on Pakistan's interests. But who in Pakistan can dare think that. If cowards in Pakistan had gathered some courage back then and intervened in Yemen this could have been prevented.

In plain simple terms ............. if you cannot protect those facilities then forget the future bail outs ............. or wait you will find someone else, beggars have no loyalties.
 

Shazam

MEMBER
Joined
Aug 22, 2019
Messages
88
Reactions
356 10
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Now if/when you have time... please see ...quantify how many Trillions of PKR have been going to Persia .. for last 15 years....
This is what I found out, an interesting phenomenon, that the Shia religious degree to imams that officially qualifies them for imamat etc actually asks that individual to pledge that he would forward Two Thirds of the Islamic taxes collected by him back to them while keeping the One Third rest for own disbursement and sustenance.

ECiyS-sUwAA2yzG.jpeg

(Please Note who the receiver of this degree is, lol, the Infamous joker Touheedi)

There you go, there in also lies the militant mindset of Iranian clergy intertwined with their personal well being and sustenance. The more the war mongering and stoking conflicts in the region, the more easier it gets for asking Islamic taxes from supporters around the world to contribute more in the name of conflicts and confirming a ticket to Jannah. All the while, the clergy sits peacefully with in the borders of Iran while the surrounding region keeps going up in ever spreading, but to date, carefully controlled flames.
 

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,116 263
The Mullah was pushed by Russia for the Aramco attack.

  1. They wanted oil prices to shoot through the roof
  2. Iranian Regime's supremacy to be established
  3. Saudis to buy Pantsir S-2 and other systems.
None of their objectives were met. Now both the Russians and their boy friend look like retards.
 

Mangus Ortus Novem

THINK TANK: SENIOR
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
115
Reactions
920 14
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
The Mullah was pushed by Russia for the Aramco attack.

  1. They wanted oil prices to shoot through the roof
  2. Iranian Regime's supremacy to be established
  3. Saudis to buy Pantsir S-2 and other systems.
None of their objectives were met. Now both the Russians and their boy friend look like retards.

Told you it was EconomicTerrorism... The Greatest Game is in town on your end too...
 

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,116 263
US Report: Khamenei Approved Saudi Attack
Thursday, 19 September, 2019

An American report revealed Wednesday that Iran’s supreme leader Ali Khamenei had approved the attack against two Saudi Aramco oil facilities last week.

He gave his blessing “but only on the condition that it be carried out in a way that made it possible to deny Iranian involvement,” a US official told CBS News.

Saudi Arabia on Wednesday displayed wreckage of Iranian cruise missiles and drones. The circuit boards can be reverse engineered to determine the exact route the weapons flew, said the report.

“But US officials said the most damning evidence is still unreleased satellite photos showing the Iranian Revolutionary Guard making preparations for the attack at Ahvaz Air Base in southwestern Iran,” it added.

The satellite photos were of no use in stopping the attack since their significance was not realized until after the fact, explained the report.

“We were caught completely off guard,” one US official said.

The Trump administration and Saudi Arabia have pointed the finger at Iran for the September 14 raids, which hit the world's biggest crude oil processing facility and initially knocked out half of Saudi output.

The French army spokesman said it sent seven experts to Saudi Arabia to join an investigation.

UN officials monitoring sanctions on Iran and Yemen are also helping probe the attack.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has said the attacks, which he described as an “act of war” against Saudi Arabia, would be a major focus of next week’s annual UN General Assembly meeting.

He had arrived in Jeddah on Wednesday for talks with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Defense.
 

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,116 263
France: Houthi Claim of Responsibility for Saudi Attack ‘Not Very Credible’
Thursday, 19 September, 2019

10057

French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian. (Reuters)


Asharq Al-Awsat

French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said Thursday that the Iran-backed Houthi militias’ claim of responsibility for the attack against Saudi Arabian oil facilities was “not very credible.”

"There is an international investigation, let's wait for its results. I don't have a specific opinion before these results", he told C News television, adding the probe into the Saudi oil attacks will be fast.

The Trump administration and Saudi Arabia have pointed the finger at Iran for the September 14 raids, which hit the world's biggest crude oil processing facility and initially knocked out half of Saudi output.

The French army spokesman said it sent seven experts to Saudi Arabia to join the investigation.

UN officials monitoring sanctions on Iran and Yemen are also helping probe the attack.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has said the attacks, which he described as an “act of war” against Saudi Arabia, would be a major focus of next week’s annual UN General Assembly meeting.

He had arrived in Jeddah on Wednesday for talks with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Defense.
 

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,116 263
Saudi Crown Prince Receives Telephone Call from Putin
Wednesday, 18 September, 2019

10059

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Defense. (SPA)

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Defense, received on Wednesday a telephone call from Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Putin expressed to the Crown Prince his strong condemnation of the attacks against Aramco oil facilities, which he said target global oil supplies.

He said Moscow as ready to take part in the investigation into determining the source of the attack.

For his part, Crown Prince Mohammed stressed that the Kingdom was seeking an investigation with international experts to assure the international community of the soundness of its measures.

He also discussed with Putin ways to stabilize the energy market.

The Saudi Defense Ministry had said earlier that it had evidence that implicates the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps in the attack.

The United States has pinned blame on Iran, with President Donald Trump announcing that he will unveil new sanctions against Tehran.
 

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,116 263
Saudi Crown Prince Receives Pompeo in Jeddah
Thursday, 19 September, 2019

10060

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman receives US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in Jeddah. (SPA)

Asharq Al-Awsat

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Defense, received in Jeddah on Wednesday US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

The US official stressed Washington’s condemnation of the attacks against Saudi Aramco’s oil facilities in Abqaiq and Khurais last week.

He reiterated his accusation that Iran was behind the attack, adding that his country supports Saudi Arabia’s invitation of international experts to probe the source of the attack.

The US supports the security and stability of the Kingdom against such criminal acts, Pompeo stressed, expressing his appreciation to the Saudi leadership and its keenness on the security and stability of the region.

For his part, Crown Prince Mohammed said the attacks aimed to destabilize the region and harm the global economy and energy supplies.

Upon his arrival in Jeddah, Pompeo had described the attack against Aramco as an “act of war”.

The Saudi Defense Ministry had earlier presented evidence of Iranian weapons that were used in the attack.
 

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,116 263
Kuwait Army Put on Alert in Wake of Regional tensions
Thursday, 19 September, 2019

The Presidency of the General Staff of Kuwait Army announced Wednesday that some military units were put in a state of combat readiness as a precaution in wake of the current regional tensions.

The measure aims to protect the safety and security of the country's land, air and territorial waters against any potential threats in coordination with the State's military and security services, according to a press release from the Presidency of the General Staff.

The Army had conducted air and naval exercises with live ammunition between 1:30 pm and 5:00 pm. Wednesday to ensure the maximum level of combat preparedness, the statement said, according to the Kuwait news agency (KUNA).

The Presidency of the General Staff urged the citizens to be wary of unverified reports in this regard that could be circulated by sources other than competent state authorities, namely the directorate of the moral guidance and public relations.
 

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,116 263
Attack on Saudi Arabia Tests U.S. Guarantee to Defend Gulf
By David D. Kirkpatrick and Ben Hubbard

Published Sept. 19, 2019
Updated Sept. 20, 2019

The oil-rich monarchies of the Persian Gulf have relied for decades on the promise of protection by the United States military, a commitment sealed by the rollback of the 1990 invasion of Kuwait and reinforced by a half dozen American military bases that sprang up around the region.

Now that commitment is facing its most serious test since the first gulf war: an attack last Saturday by a swarm of at least 17 missiles and drones that crippled Saudi Arabia’s most critical oil installation and temporarily knocked out 5 percent of the world’s oil supply.

Washington and Riyadh blamed Iran, despite its denials, and President Trump threatened that the United States was “locked and loaded.” Yet despite months of such bravado, Mr. Trump has been hesitant to take military action that might risk an expanded conflagration. For better or worse, such a muted response could signal another turning point for the region.

“It is enormous,” said Gregory Gause, a scholar of the region at Texas A&M University. “This is the most serious challenge since the invasion of Kuwait to the status of the United States as a great power that would protect the free flow of energy from the region, and unless there is a big change in the response from the Trump administration I think Gulf leaders will start to question the value of that security commitment.”

Confounding expectations on all sides of the Persian Gulf, the attack and its aftermath have laid bare a cascade of revelations about the regional balance of power.

The stunning success of the attack has shown that billions of dollars in Saudi military spending has left the kingdom’s central industry vulnerable, and it has demonstrated to the world that the increasing availability of low-flying cruise missiles and drones may have rendered many other defense systems perilously obsolete.

It has also shown the world a new side of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the hard charging and often impulsive de facto ruler of the kingdom: He, too, has been forced in this case to back away from immediate retribution against his nemesis, Iran.

If Iran carried out the attack directly, as Washington and Riyadh say, then it has taken a brazen step beyond its familiar strategy of working through allied militant groups to strike at its foes, evidently surprising the White House.

Seeking to exact a price from the United States for its sanctions on Iranian oil sales, Tehran may also now be emboldened to carry out further attacks, calculating that President Trump will balk at another war in the region. The attack on Saudi Arabia was just the latest in a string of recent attacks carried out by Iran or a proxy — including attacks on oil tankers and the downing of an American drone — with little or no cost to Iran.
And President Trump, focused on his re-election, has so far shown himself less willing to match Iran’s escalation than his ferocious tweets about “obliteration” and “the official end of Iran” had suggested. He recently fired the adviser most hawkish on Iran, John R. Bolton, the former national security adviser. And instead of emphasizing the traditional American interest in the free flow of oil, he appears to have returned to a view he espoused before his election — “Saudi Arabia should fight their own wars,” as he wrote in a tweet in 2014.

That Iran would seek in some way to attack Saudi oil production, though, was hardly unexpected. Experts had predicted for months that the Trump administration’s “maximum pressure” campaign of sanctions against Iran’s oil sales would drive it to lash out against the oil production of Saudi Arabia and the Arab Gulf States.

The rulers of those Arab states had previously accused President Obama of trying to pull back from the American commitment to the region. They faulted him for negotiating a 2015 deal with Iran to limit its nuclear program in exchange for relief from economic sanctions without further constraining its military or other activities. And the Gulf leaders were outraged when Mr. Obama called off a planned strike against Syria, an Iranian ally, for using chemical weapons against civilians.

Now some prominent voices in the Arab Gulf States accuse Mr. Trump of an even greater betrayal. “Trump, in his response to Iran, is even worse than Obama,” said Abdulkhaleq Abdulla, a prominent political scientist in the United Arab Emirates.

Instead of reversing the perceived pullback as Gulf leaders had expected, Mr. Abdulla argued, President Trump let down his Arab partners by failing to respond more forcefully to Iranian aggressions.

The United States has said that Iran was behind naval mines that damaged five oil tankers in the Persian Gulf this spring, and in June Iran boasted of shooting down an American surveillance drone. Yet President Trump did little in retaliation for the tanker attacks and called off a planned airstrike against Iran in response to the downing of the drone.

“His inaction gave a green light to this,” Mr. Abdulla said. “Now an Arab Gulf strategic partner has been massively attacked by Iran — which was provoked by Trump, not by us — and we hear Americans saying to us, you need to defend yourselves!”


“It is an utter failure and utter disappointment in this administration,” he added.

Mr. Trump has not ruled out a military strike, and senior national security officials met Thursday to refine a list of potential targets should President Trump go that route. Still, he has made clear his opposition to another war, and has ordered new sanctions.

But Iran is already under acute economic pressure from the existing sanctions, which use the reach of the American financial system to try to choke off Iranian oil exports anywhere in the world. After pulling out of the 2015 nuclear deal, the Trump administration implemented the sweeping new penalties this spring to try to force Iran to accept a more restrictive agreement.

Iranian leaders have denounced the sanctions as “economic warfare,” and they appear to have orchestrated an escalating series of attacks that threaten the flow of Persian Gulf oil in order to inflict some of the same pain on the United States and Washington’s Arab allies.
“The Iranians do feel cornered,” Professor Gause said, and that is why they appear to be taking more aggressive action than they have in the past. “This is an effort by Iran to break out of what they see as strangulation.”

Defending the administration’s policies, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo argued this week that the sanctions may have limited Iran’s ability to strike with even more sophisticated missiles or drones.
“They’d have more complex ones but for the sanctions we put in place that have prevented them from getting access to money, most importantly, but also parts, spare parts, information technology,” he told reporters on a trip to Saudi Arabia.

Iranian leaders have denied responsibility for the attack last weekend, but at the same time they have openly reveled in its success. It showed the United States “that playing with the lion’s tail carries serious dangers and if they take action against Iran there will be no tomorrow for them,” Brig. Gen. Hossein Dehghan of the elite Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corp boasted Thursday, Iranian news media reported.

The Iranians may have previously worried about Mr. Trump’s threatening tweets and hawkish advisers, said Suzanne Maloney, an Iran scholar at Brookings Institution. “But now they see that he is not going to follow through on the bluff that he has carried out on behalf of the American people,” she said.

Others analysts argued that the alarms from the Persian Gulf about an American retreat were overblown under President Obama and remain so under President Trump. American warships are patrolling the gulf to help protect tanker traffic. American satellite and surveillance drones patrol the skies. The many large American military bases deter invasions or other large-scale military actions.

But President Trump’s combination of tough threats and a weak response “is the worst of both worlds,” argued Jeremy Shapiro, research director of the European Council on Foreign Relations and a former State Department official in the Obama administration.
“It would be foolish to counter this escalation with an escalation, but it was foolish to get into this position in the first place,” he argued, leaving the Trump administration “to choose between an unwise escalation or a humiliating climb-down.”

Experts on military technology said Saudi Arabia should not be faulted for failing to stop the attack. Like those of other countries, Saudi Arabia’s defenses were designed to stop ballistic missiles. This attack appears to have been carried out with low-flying cruise missiles or drones that would escape detection by most radar systems.
“I don’t think that there is any country that could have defended any better than Saudi Arabia did, and that includes the United States,” said Peter Roberts, director of military sciences at the Royal United Services Institute, an international research institute.

Yet the attack appears to have caused some rethinking by Crown Prince Mohammed.

Soon after he was first named defense minister, in 2015, he plunged the kingdom into a military campaign in neighboring Yemen to drive from power a faction backed by Iran. Saudi media outlets proclaimed that the prince was asserting the kingdom’s power and leading a new drive to roll back Iranian influence.

“The Iranians, they’re the cause of problems in the Middle East, but they are not a big threat to Saudi Arabia,” the prince boasted confidently to
Time magazine in 2018. “Saudi Arabia’s economy is double the size of the Iranian economy,” he said, adding that Iran’s army was “not among the top five” in the Middle East.

“We will work so that the battle is for them in Iran, and not in Saudi Arabia,” he promised on a Saudi news channel.

Yet the damage to the oil installation was a painful lesson in the potential costs of a wider conflict, at a time when the Saudi military remains bogged down in Yemen and Prince Mohammed has been pushing for a public sale of the Saudi state oil company.

The Saudi decision to call for an international investigation and not immediate retribution may be the choice of a chastened prince, analysts said. “I think there has a been a calculation that the costs might be too high,” said Rebecca Wasser, a senior policy analyst at the RAND Corporation.

Farnaz Fassihi contributed reporting.
 

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,116 263
Trump’s National Security Aides Refining Possible Iran Options
By Eric Schmitt and Edward Wong
Sept. 19, 2019

1568969550100.png

Mark T. Esper, left, the secretary of defense, and Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, are expected to present updated options for possible military action against Iran to President Trump at a meeting scheduled for Friday.CreditCreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

WASHINGTON — Senior national security officials from across the government met on Thursday to refine a list of potential targets to strike in Iran, should President Trump order a military retaliation for missile and drone attacks on Saudi Arabian oil fields last weekend, officials said.

Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper and Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, are to present the updated options to Mr. Trump at a National Security Council meeting scheduled for Friday, a senior American official said.

In advance of being presented with the newest set of options, Mr. Trump has sent different signals on his intentions. He has threatened to order “the ultimate option” of a strike on Iran to punish the nation for its behavior, but also has made clear his continued opposition to ordering the United States into another war in the Middle East.

The Pentagon is advocating military strikes that one senior official described as at the lower end of options. The official said that any retaliation could focus on more clandestine operations — actions that military planners predict would not prompt an escalation by Iran.

These kinds of targets could include the sites where Iran launches cruise missiles and drones, and where the weaponry is stored. Under this scenario, the military option would include a diplomatic outreach campaign at the United Nations General Assembly in New York next week to muster support for the additional sanctions that Mr. Trump has ordered and other nonmilitary steps. Mr. Trump has said new sanctions against Iran will be put in place. A range of covert cyberoperations is also being discussed.

[A military strike against Iran would result in “an all-out war,” Iran’s foreign minister said Thursday.]

It remains unclear, though, whether the United States and Saudi Arabia could muster strong support at the United Nations, since the Saudis have been criticized for waging a war in Yemen that has caused civilian casualties and since Mr. Trump has faced strong criticism for pulling the United States out of a multilateral nuclear deal with Iran.

But the senior American official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations, warned that Mr. Trump would also be presented with other options that are stronger, options that would require dispatching more forces to the Persian Gulf region.

The official offered no details on those targets, but presumably they could include Iranian oil facilities or targets involving Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps. Mr. Trump’s contradictory statements on Wednesday left senior Defense Department and military officers guessing about which course of action the president would choose.

Several issues might delay any immediate military action, officials said. First, Saudi Arabia is said to fear that any military response could rapidly escalate and lead to further attacks against the kingdom and its vulnerable oil facilities.

Another issue is that American military forensic specialists have only arrived in the past couple of days at the site of the attacks in Saudi Arabia. Their analysis of circuit boards recovered from one of the cruise missiles — which could provide valuable clues about the missile’s trajectory and flight path — is still underway. That information could be important to making a case as to who is responsible for the attacks.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Thursday that Mr. Trump was seeking a peaceful route. “We’d like a peaceful resolution indeed,” he told reporters in the United Arab Emirates before ending a two-day trip to the Gulf region. “We’re still striving to build out a coalition. I was here in an act of diplomacy while the foreign minister of Iran is threatening all-out war to fight to the last American. We’re here to build out a coalition aimed at achieving peace and a peaceful resolution.”

Mr. Pompeo said the United States planned to impose more sanctions on Iran, as Mr. Trump had announced on Wednesday. “We have set about a course of action to deny Iran the capacity and the wealth to prevent them from conducting their terror campaigns,” he said. “And you can see from the events of last week there’s more work to do.”

European nations, which have been trying to salvage the 2015 nuclear agreement with Iran, have been cautious in their response to the attack in Saudi Arabia. On Wednesday, the French government announced that President Emmanuel Macron promised in a telephone call the previous day with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman that French experts would go to Saudi Arabia to assist in the investigation, at the request of the Saudis.
Along with France, Germany and Britain, China and Russia also entered into the 2015 agreement with Iran. All five nations, four of which are permanent members of the United Nations Security Council, have criticized the Trump administration for withdrawing from the agreement. And China in particular has chafed at the sanctions on Iranian oil imposed by Washington.

American officials have not yet laid out the case against Iran and the recommendations they intend to present at the United Nations General Assembly meeting next week.
“I’m confident that in New York we’ll talk a lot about this and that the Saudis will too,” Mr. Pompeo said on Wednesday. “The Saudis were the nation that was attacked. It was on their soil. It was an act of war against them directly, and I’m confident they will do that.”

That indicates there could be a period of discussion among international leaders before Washington proceeds with any strong actions.
 

Khafee

Professional
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
6,758
Reactions
6,116 263
UK’s Johnson, Trump Discuss Need for United Diplomatic Response to Saudi Attack
Thursday, 19 September, 2019

10062

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson meets US President Donald Trump for bilateral talks during the G7 summit in Biarritz, France August 25, 2019. (Reuters)

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and US President Donald Trump condemned last weekend’s attack on Saudi Arabian oil facilities and discussed the need for a united diplomatic response in a telephone call on Wednesday, Johnson’s office said.

“They condemned the attacks and discussed the need for a united diplomatic response from international partners,” a statement said.

“They also spoke about Iran and agreed that they must not be allowed to obtain a nuclear weapon.”

A White House spokesman said in a statement the two leaders “reaffirmed the value of the special relationship in addressing shared security concerns, most notably Iran’s destabilizing behavior”.

The US accused Iran of launching the attacks against Aramco’s Abqaiq and Khurais oil facilities.

Saudi Arabia on Wednesday presented evidence of Iranian drones and missiles that were used in the attacks.

Tensions in the Gulf have risen since Trump unilaterally withdrew the US from Tehran's 2015 nuclear deal with world powers. Britain and other European countries are still abiding by the agreement.

Iran has responded to the withdrawal by reducing its commitments to the accord.
 

Top