Turkey S-400 Dilemma | Page 4 | World Defense

Turkey S-400 Dilemma

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Senate moves to allow weapon sales to Cyprus, block F-35 to Turkey
27 June 2019
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American arms sales to Cyprus have been banned since 1987 due to a long-running dispute between Cyprus and Turkey over northern Cyprus. (Yiannis Kourtoglou/AFP via Getty Images)

WASHINGTON — The Senate Foreign Relations Committee has taken a step toward allowing the sale of American weapons to the nation of Cyprus, in a move that could needle NATO ally Turkey.

Authored by the committee’s top Democrat, Sen. Bob Menendez of New Jersey, the proposed Eastern Mediterranean Security and Energy Partnership Act of 2019 also contains language impeding the transfer of F-35 Joint Strike Fighters to Turkey should the government there continue with plans to procure the Russian-made S-400 air defense system. The bill passed through the committee Tuesday.

“I am thrilled to see such strong bipartisan support for this important piece of legislation to chart a new path forward for the eastern Mediterranean,” Menendez said in a statement. “The Eastern Mediterranean is a region of central importance to our country, and it must therefore figure more prominently in how we allocate diplomatic energy, engagement and resources. I look forward to working with my colleagues so that this important legislation is swiftly considered and approved by the full Senate.”

American arms sales to Cyprus have been banned since 1987, despite that nation working with the U.S. on a number of security areas, including nonproliferation activities. The reason for the arms ban: a long-running dispute between Cyprus and Turkey over northern Cyprus, which Turkey solely recognizes as its territory and has occupied for decades despite global reunification efforts. As a result, Cyprus has been home to a long-running U.N. peacekeeping operation.

The U.S. was wary of arming Cyprus with weapons that could potentially be used to inflame the conflict with long-standing NATO ally Turkey. However, Turkey’s slide away from Europe in recent years, including its plan to buy the S-400, has led to an increasing willingness from members of Congress to turn up the heat on Ankara.

The Senate is not acting alone; in April, Rep. David Cicilline, D-R.I., introduced the End the Cyprus Arms Embargo legislation in the House, where it has garnered several co-sponsors. The Senate language notes that the arms embargo has meant Cyprus looks to others, including Russia, to supply its defense equipment.

The bill as written would also prohibit the use of funds to transfer planes or technology related to the F-35 to Turkey should it accept the S-400. The head of Russia’s Rosoboronexport firm was quoted Wednesday by local press as saying the first S-400 will be delivered to Turkey in July.

Other parts of the act would authorize $3 million in foreign military financing for Greece to buy American-made weapons, authorize international military education and training assistance for Greece and Cyprus between fiscal years 2020-2022, and establish a U.S.-Eastern Mediterranean Energy Center to coordinate energy cooperation between the U.S., Israel, Greece and Cyprus.


 

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Russia to Complete Delivery of S-400 Systems to Turkey by Year-End - FSMTC
26.06.2019

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PATRIOT PARK (Russia) (Sputnik) - The supply of Russia's S-400 air defence missile systems to Turkey and the training of Turkish specialists are to be completed by the end of the year, spokeswoman for the Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation (FSMTC) Maria Vorovyova told reporters Wednesday.

"The contract for the supply of S-400 Triumf air defence missile systems to the Republic of Turkey is being implemented in accordance with agreed deadlines. As Turkish officials have repeatedly stated, the shipment of equipment may begin as early as next month. We are planning to complete the obligations on the supply of equipment and training of the client's specialists by the end of the year," Vorobyova said.

Previously, Washington and its allies urged Ankara not to install the S-400 system, warning that otherwise, the US will stop Turkish forces from flying and developing its F-35 jets. However, Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan said on Tuesday that Ankara will proceed with the military equipment purchase despite the concerns of allies.

In 2017, Moscow and Ankara signed an agreement for the delivery of the S-400 systems. However, this move angered Washington, as, according to the US, the systems might be incompatible with NATO standards. In spite of the US threats to impose sanctions against Ankara, Turkish officials said that the purchase of military equipment is a sovereign right and ruled out the possibility of abandoning plans to acquire the S-400 systems.

 

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Turkey's Erdogan says U.S. will not impose sanctions over Russian missile deal
29 June 2019
Roberta Rampton, Tuvan Gumrukcu

View attachment 8642
Russian President Vladimir Putin (R) shakes hands with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan during their bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan, on June 29, 2019. Yuri Kadobnov/Pool via REUTERS

OSAKA/ANKARA (Reuters) - Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan said on Saturday the United States did not plan to impose sanctions on Ankara for buying Russian defense systems, after the U.S. president said Turkey had not been treated fairly over the contract.

The NATO allies have been at odds over Turkey’s decision to procure the Russian S-400 missile defense systems, with Washington warning of sanctions if the deal goes through.

Russia’s Interfax agency on Saturday quoted a Kremlin spokesman as saying that the deal envisaged a partial handover of technology.
Turkey has said it would not back down before the early July delivery date, further testing relations that are already strained over a host of other issues

But in contrast to statements by U.S. officials, Donald Trump said Turkey had been treated unfairly over its decision to buy the S-400s and blamed the “mess” on the administration of former President Barack Obama. Trump did not rule out sanctions.

Speaking shortly after bilateral talks with Trump at the G20 summit in Japan, Erdogan said that the S-400s would be delivered in the first half of July, adding he had heard directly from Trump that there would be no sanctions.

“We have heard from him personally that this would not happen,” Erdogan said. “We are strategic partners with the United States. As strategic partners, nobody has the right to meddle in Turkey’s sovereign rights. Everyone should know this.”

Earlier, asked if the United States would impose sanctions on Turkey, Trump, sitting alongside Erdogan, said the issue was being discussed, but it was a “two-way street” and both sides were evaluating “different solutions”.

The United States says the S-400s are not compatible with NATO’s defense network and could compromise its Lockheed Martin (LMT.N) F-35 stealth fighter jets, an aircraft Turkey is helping to build and planning to buy.

Under possible U.S. sanctions, Turkey could face expulsion from the F-35 program, a move Erdogan has dismissed. But Washington has already started the process of removing Turkey from the F-35 program, halting training of Turkish pilots in the United States on the aircraft.

“We have a payment so far of $1.4 billion to the United States,” Erdogan said. “As joint producers, until now four F-35 jets have been delivered to us, but we will still receive... a total of 116 jets. We are expecting these,” he added.

“What some people in lower ranks are saying absolutely do not align with Mr Trump’s approach. I believe these will not harm our bilateral ties, and that is the commitment we are going on with.”

‘UNFAIR’ TREATMENT

Despite the threat of sanctions, Turkey had put its hopes on the relationship between Erdogan and Trump, saying it expected the U.S. president to protect it from sanctions over the S-400 deal.

Ahead of Saturday’s talks, the meeting between Erdogan and Trump was seen as Turkey’s last push to avoid U.S. sanctions that could significantly damage its already ailing economy.

Even minor U.S. sanctions could prompt another sharp sell-off in the Turkish lira. A 30% slide in the currency drove the economy into recession last year, and the lira has lost another 10 percent this year.

Erdogan’s comments also appeared to go beyond statements made by the Turkish presidency and the White House after the talks between the two leaders, which lasted around 40 minutes.

The White House said Trump “expressed concern” over the S-400 deal and “encouraged Turkey to work with the United States on defense cooperation in a way that strengthens the NATO alliance”, while the Turkish presidency said Trump had voiced a desire to resolve the dispute without harming bilateral ties.

In an effort to sway Turkey, the United States has offered to supply it with Raytheon Co (RTN.N) Patriot missiles, but Erdogan has said the U.S. offer was not as good as Russia’s S-400 proposal.

Speaking at a news conference at the G20 minutes before Erdogan, Trump blamed Barack Obama’s administration for placing conditions on Turkey’s purchase of Patriot missiles and treating Turkey unfairly, and added Erdogan had no fault in the dispute.

“This administration previous to mine would not let him buy it (Patriots). So (Erdogan) goes out, he goes to Russia, and makes a deal for the S-400,” Trump said. “He made a deal, he paid them a lot of money, put up a lot of money. And he bought it.”

“As soon as he bought it (S-400), people went back to him from our country and they said, ‘Listen, we don’t want you to use that system because it’s not the NATO system,” he added. “He got treated very unfairly.”

Trump also said he would visit Turkey, but added that a date had not been set yet. Erdogan said earlier this week that Trump may visit in July.

Additional reporting by Maria Vasilyeva in MOSCOW, Malcolm Foster and Chang-Ran Kim in TOKYO; Editing by Robert Birsel and Stephen Powell

 

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Kremlin says S-400 deal with Turkey envisages partial technologies handover: Ifax
29 June 2019


View attachment 8643
Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov waits before a welcoming ceremony attended by Russian President Vladimir Putin and Kyrgyz President Sooronbay Jeenbekov in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan March 28, 2019. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov


MOSCOW (Reuters) - Moscow’s deal with Ankara, under which Russia would supply S-400 missile defense systems to Turkey, envisages a partial handover of technologies, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said on Saturday, the Interfax news agency reported.

Turkey said earlier there was no setback in its plan to buy Russian S-400 systems, despite U.S. opposition, and President Donald Trump expressed understanding for the decision but did not rule out sanctions in response.

Reporting by Andrey Ostroukh; Editing by Edmund Blair


 

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This means Turkey is officially out of NATO unless a new government takes over and restore relations with the US.
 

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Turkey To Get Russian S-400s In Ten Days
02 July 2019

View attachment 8938
S400 Missile Launcher

Ankara will begin receiving Russian S-400 Triumf missile defense systems in ten days, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan reportedly said on Monday.

“We will get the Russian systems in ten days. I’m certain we can resolve disagreements with the US caused by the S-400 deal,” NTV reported quoting Tayyip as saying on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Japan, after negotiations with his US counterpart Donald Trump.

“Washington will not impose sanctions on Ankara over the purchase of Russia’s S-400 systems,” he added. The President also said that Ankara is awaiting the delivery of 100 fifth-generation F-35 American fighters.

Recent reports suggested that Turkey was considering alternatives such as the Russian Su-57, Chinese J-31 or even accelerating the development of its own fighter jet, after the US-Turkey F-35 Jet deal seemed to be heading towards a possible collapse.

The relationship between the two countries soured further with Russia’s proposal of manufacturing components of the S-400 systems jointly with Turkey. Washington also halted the training of Turkish pilots of US F-35 fighter jets, in addition to threatening economic and other military sanctions as Ankara insisted on its S-400 deal with Russia.

 

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Turkey To Deploy S-400 Battery In ‘Strategically Important” Location In South-east
July 3, 2019

View attachment 9003

Turkey is likely to deploy the first of the two Russian-made S-400 batteries in Ankara while another of those batteries will be installed at a “strategically important location” in the eastern and south-eastern region of Turkey, sources have revealed.

“Places where S-400 will be deployed have been determined,” Ömer Çelik, ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party) spokesperson Ömer Çelik was quoted as saying by Daily Sabah last week. Celik did not divulge any other details.

“Ankara will begin receiving Russian S-400 Triumf missile defense systems in about ten days,” Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan announced during his visit to Japan for the G20 Osaka summit.

He also said Turkey will resolve all friction caused between Washington and Ankara over the S-400 purchase and is awaiting the delivery of American F-35 stealth fighters, even as the US halted the training of Turkish pilots of F-35 aircraft.

In addition, the US threatened economic and other military sanctions as Ankara insisted on its S-400 deal with Russia. But, according to the Turkish president, the US will not impose sanctions against the country.

The relationship between the two countries soured further with Russia’s proposal of manufacturing components of the S-400 systems jointly with Turkey.

Recent reports suggested that Turkey was considering alternatives such as the Russian Su-57, Chinese J-31 or even accelerating the development of its own fighter jet, after the US-Turkey F-35 Jet deal seemed to be heading towards a possible collapse.

 

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Turkish Media Releases Details on How S-400 Will Be Delivered
05 July 2019

View attachment 9078
Turkey's decision to buy the advanced Russian-made air defence system has led to a significant souring of relations with Washington, which has threatened to slap Ankara with sanctions and to deprive the country of the F-35 fighters it had already bought and paid for.

The first batch of Turkey-bound S-400s will be loaded onto planes at a Russian military base this coming Sunday and sent to Turkey sometime next week, Haberturk TV has reported, citing unnamed sources.

According to the TV channel's information, the delivery will be made using two cargo planes, with a team of nine Russian engineers responsible for installing the system in Turkey to arrive in the country by Monday.

The delivery will bring one complete S-400 missile system to Turkey, Haberturk specified.

On Thursday, a spokesman for the Turkish president said Ankara would receive its Russian-made air defence systems "very soon, in the coming days," and promised that they "will be actively used." The spokesman added that authorities are still examining options about where the S-400s will be placed, with discussions previously held about deploying them in Qatar or Azerbaijan to avoid exacerbating Turkish-US tensions over the purchase. Authorities had originally discussed placing the air defence systems around the Turkish capital.

During their meeting in Osaka, Japan at the G20 summit last week, President Trump told Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan that Washington treated Ankara 'unfairly' over its missile deal with Russia, blaming his predecessor Barack Obama for refusing to supply Turkey with its Patriot missile systems ahead of time. "You have to treat people fairly…and I don't think he was treated fairly," Trump said.

In spite of Trump's comments, the US has continued to threaten Turkey with sanctions under the Countering America's Adversaries Through Sanctions Act (CAATSA), and
has warned that it may drop Ankara from the F-35 fighter programme and scrap plans to deliver the planes to the country. Turkey, which has invested over a billion dollars into the programme and produces several components for the aircraft, has yet to take possession of a single F-35, with four F-35s destined for Turkey remaining at a US airbase. Last month, Turkish pilots training aboard the aircraft were grounded.

Earlier in the week, commenting on the F-35 holdup, Erdogan accused the US of engaging in "robbery," recalling that Washington and Ankara had previously signed an
agreement on the sale of 116 F-35s to Turkey.

Russia and Turkey penned a $2.5 billion agreement on the sale of four battalion sets of S-400s to Turkey in late 2018. A year later, the US cleared a $3.5 billion Patriot
missile deal for the country, but Ankara has yet to accept it, saying its terms aren't as good as those provided by Russia for the S-400s, which include a loan agreement.

US and NATO officials have repeatedly alleged that the S-400 is 'incompatible' with alliance air defence standards, and claimed the system's presence in Turkey might allow Russia to collect important information about the F-35 and other NATO systems. In May, a senior Pentagon official said the deployment of S-400s in Turkey would be "devastating," both for the F-35 programme and in terms of Turkish interoperability with NATO.

 

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Turkey Considering Placing S-400 Systems In Qatar, Azerbaijan
06 July 2019

View attachment 9108

Turkey may be considering placing the S-400 air defence systems in Qatar or Azerbaijan as a way out of its impasse with Washington.

“The authorities are still examining options about where the S-400s will be placed, with discussions previously held about deploying them in Qatar or Azerbaijan to avoid exacerbating Turkish-US tensions over the purchase,” spokesman for the Turkish president was quoted as saying by Sputnik on Friday.

However, earlier this week, sources revealed that the NATO member state was likely to deploy the first of the two Russian-made S-400 batteries in Ankara while another of those batteries would be installed at a “strategically important location” in the eastern and south-eastern region of Turkey.

“Authorities had originally discussed placing the air defence systems around the Turkish capital,” the spokesman said.

The first batch of the Russian S-400 systems will be loaded onto two cargo planes at a military base on Sunday to be delivered to Turkey next week, reports Haberturk TV.

Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan recently said that Ankara was being treated “unfairly” with respect to the S-400 deal. He has accused former US president Barack Obama for not approving Patriot missile systems that Turkey had earlier requested for.

Trump responded to the comment, saying, "You have to treat people fairly…and I don't think he was treated fairly."

Erdogan also reportedly accused the US of engaging in "robbery," recalling that Washington and Ankara had signed an agreement on the sale of 116 F-35s to Turkey and now the delivery of the fighters has been put on hold.

Russia and Turkey penned a $2.5 billion agreement on the sale of four battalion sets of S-400s to Turkey in late 2018. A year later, the US cleared a $3.5 billion Patriot missile deal for the country, but Ankara has yet to accept it, saying its terms aren't as good as those provided by Russia for the S-400s, which include a loan agreement, the report said.

 

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Turkey Will Soon Have Russia's S-400 (And Is Stockpiling F-16 Parts)
July 7, 2019

View attachment 9145
Turkey has been stockpiling parts for F-16s and other military equipment in anticipation of a U.S. sanction for acquiring the Russian S-400 air defense system.
by
Dario Leone

A Bloomberg report says Turkey has been stockpiling parts for F-16s and other military equipment in anticipation of a U.S. sanction for acquiring the Russian S-400 air defense system.
Two anonymous officials from Turkey who spoke to the news outlet refused to clarify on what types of spares were accumulated, how much was acquired and how long they can last.
Relations between the two countries deteriorated over the course of the Syrian civil war, when the U.S. armed a Kurdish militia that Turkey views as a terrorist group, and in the aftermath of a 2016 coup attempt against Erdogan that his government blames on a Turkish imam residing in the U.S.

NATO member Turkey is determined to acquire ballistic missile technology, and aims to co-produce the next generation of the S-400, the officials added, citing discussions with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Erdogan said his country will take delivery of the S-400 within days.
“The first batch of S-400s will be delivered in a week or 10 days,” Haberturk newspaper cited him as saying in a report Monday. “I’ve clearly told this to Trump, Mr. Putin also said it.”

The U.S. argues that the pivot to Moscow could allow Russia to collect critical intelligence that would weaken NATO and compromise the American F-35 stealth fighter, which Turkish companies are helping to build. Yet while Congress is drawing up potential sanctions plans that at their harshest would cripple the Turkish economy, U.S. President Donald Trump has cast Turkey as a victim in the saga.
At the Group of 20 nations meeting in Japan on Saturday, the U.S. president said Erdogan was treated unfairly by the Obama administration when he sought to buy the U.S. built Patriot air-defense system. While the S-400 deal is “a problem,” the U.S. is “looking at different solutions,” he said.

Turkey in fact turned to Russia to address weaknesses in its air defense after failing to persuade the U.S. to share technology from its Patriot air-defense system as part of any acquisition deal.
A resolution submitted to the House of Representatives seeking sanctions against Turkey may hold a clue to the focus of Turkey’s parts-buying spree.

“In addition to the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, Turkish defense acquisition programs that could be affected by sanctions include the Patriot air and missile defense system, CH-47F Chinook heavy lift helicopter, UH-60 Black Hawk utility helicopter and F-16s,” the resolution says.
The U.S. has threatened to end Turkey’s participation in the F-35 fighter program by July 31 if Ankara doesn’t scrap the S-400 deal.

If Turkey is excluded from the F-35 program, it will look for alternatives, including Russian Su-57 jets, while trying to develop its own warplanes and ballistic missiles for domestic use and export, the Turkish officials said.
If Turkey had to buy the Su-57 it would be the first country (outside Russia) to buy the first Russian stealth fighter after India dropped out of Sukhoi/HAL Fifth Generation Fighter Aircraft (FGFA), known in India as the Perspective Multirole Fighter (PMF), which actually was a derivative project of the Sukhoi Su-57.

The Sukhoi Su-57 is a stealth, single-seat, twin-engine multirole fifth-generation fighter aircraft designed for air superiority and attack roles. The aircraft is the product of the PAK FA (literally “Prospective Airborne Complex of Frontline Aviation”) program. Sukhoi’s internal designation for the aircraft is T-50.
In fact, Russian state media claimed that the Su-57 will feature a maximum speed of 1,600 mph, slightly more than that of the F-22 Raptor, and that its missile range, based on the information available, also exceeds that of the F-22.

 

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Turkish Official on S-400 Deal: Protection of Our Borders Means Protection of NATO, Europe
Igor Zarembo
07.07.2019

View attachment 9194

Ankara's agreement with Russia to purchase S-400 surface-to-air defence missile systems has been a major source of tension between Turkey and the United States, as Washington has warned Ankara of possible sanctions if the deal goes through.

Omer Celik, a spokesperson for the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP), has reiterated that Turkey is unwavering in its determination to reinforce air defence systems in response to continued threats arising from Syria, Iraq and the eastern Mediterranean, reports the Anadolu news agency.

Speaking at a news conference after President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s meeting with AKP lawmakers at the party's Istanbul branch, Celik said enhancing the country’s air defence system was a “requirement of national security as a sovereign state.”

The AKP spokesman engaged the support of Turkey's allies regarding the S-400 issue, saying:
“The protection of Turkey’s borders is the protection of the borders of NATO and Europe, as well as it is for Turkey’s national security.”

When asked where the S-400s would be deployed, Celik said: “The system will be deployed in a way to meet Turkey's need at a maximum level.”

Ankara's deal with Moscow over the S-400 surface-to-air defence missile system has long been a major source of tension between Turkey and the US.

During the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan, President Erdogan said Donald Trump told him there would be no sanctions targeting Turkey after it receives the S-400 defence systems.

At the summit, Trump blamed the standoff on then-President Barack Obama's refusal to sell Patriot missiles to Turkey, and said Turkey had not been treated fairly.
In a joint presser with Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Trump said Turkey “was not allowed to buy Patriot missiles by the Obama administration” and his administration was looking at various options regarding its purchase of Russia’s S-400 missiles.

"Turkey is a NATO member and was not treated fairly," Trump said.
When asked about possible sanctions against Turkey, Trump said “we are looking at it, but it’s a two-way street”.

Russian-Turkish cooperation on S-400 deliveries has been repeatedly criticised by the US, as it urged Turkey to buy US Patriot missiles, arguing the Russian system would be incompatible with NATO and could result in punitive sanctions.

After protracted unsuccessful efforts to purchase an air defence system from the US under the Obama administration, Ankara opted in 2017 to purchase Russian S-400s, while emphasising the system would not be integrated into NATO and would not pose a threat to the alliance.

The first shipment of S-400 air defence systems is expected to be delivered to Ankara in July.


 

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Turkey proceeds with deal for Russian missile system despite US and NATO warnings
Amanda Macias


Key Points
  • Moscow announced it was in the process of delivering a much-anticipated missile system to Ankara.
  • The S-400 is said to pose a risk to the NATO alliance as well as the F-35, America’s most expensive weapons platform.
  • “We underscore that Turkey will face very real and negative consequences if it completes its S-400 delivery,” a U.S. State Department official told CNBC.
GP: Russia S-400 missile system

Russian S-400 Triumf surface-to-air missile launchers in Moscow on May 4, 2019.
Mladen Antonov | AFP | Getty Images


WASHINGTON — A messy multibillion-dollar deal between Turkey and the United States took another turn over the weekend as Moscow announced it was in the process of delivering a much-anticipated missile system to Ankara.

The delivery of the Russian-made S-400, a mobile surface-to-air missile system, is said to pose a risk to the NATO alliance as well as the F-35, America’s most expensive weapons platform.

Turkey, a NATO partner, faces several consequences for accepting the Kremlin’s missile system, including economic sanctions and removal from the supply chain for the F-35.

“We underscore that Turkey will face very real and negative consequences if it completes its S-400 delivery,” a U.S. State Department official told CNBC. “NATO countries need to procure military equipment that is interoperable with NATO systems. A Russian system would not meet that standard.” The official, who declined to be named, said that NATO allies and the U.S. have offered Turkey other missile platforms.

The Pentagon and White House did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

In 2017, Ankara brokered a deal reportedly worth $2.5 billion with the Kremlin for the S-400 despite warnings from the U.S. that buying the system would come with political and economic consequences.

The S-400, the successor to the S-200 and S-300 missile systems, made its debut in 2007. Compared with U.S. systems, the Russian-made S-400 is believed to be capable of engaging a wider array of targets, at longer ranges and against multiple threats simultaneously.


Premium: Vladimir Putin and Recep Tayyip Erdogan 170928

Russia’s President Vladimir Putin and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan shake hands at a joint news conference following their talks, September 28, 2017.
Mikhail Metzel | TASS | Getty Images


In September, CNBC learned that Turkey had begun construction on a site for the S-400 system. An intelligence assessment included satellite imagery of a concrete launch facility as well as bunkers. The new construction fit the pattern for Russia’s S-400 system.

In multiple efforts to deter Turkey from buying the S-400, the State Department offered in 2013 and 2017 to sell the country Raytheon’s Patriot missile system. Ankara passed on the Patriot both times because the U.S. declined to provide a transfer of the system’s sensitive missile technology.

All the while, Turkey became a financial and manufacturing partner for Lockheed Martin’s F-35 jet, the world’s most advanced fighter.

In April, CNBC reported that Lockheed Martin and Raytheon were preparing to make massive adjustments to their intricate production schedules amid contentious negotiations with Turkey.

If Turkey went through with the Russian deal, Lockheed Martin would have to rework its supply chain on components for the F-35 fighter jet, while also making changes to its production schedule. Yet if Turkey abandoned its deal with Russia, Raytheon would reorganize the Patriot missile defense system production schedule to guarantee that Turkey could receive the missile system within a faster time frame.
H/O: F35A Lockheed Martin

An F-35 at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida.
US Air Force


Last month, the Pentagon announced it would begin “unwinding” Ankara’s participation in the F-35 program on the heels of reports that Turkey sent personnel to Russia for training on the S-400 system.

“As we have very clearly communicated at all levels, Turkey will not receive the F-35 if Turkey takes delivery of the S-400 system. Thus we need to begin unwinding Turkey’s participation in the F-35 program,” Ellen Lord, undersecretary of Defense for acquisition and sustainment, told reporters last month at the Pentagon.

She also added that the U.S. will suspend ongoing F-35 training for Turkish pilots, order the departure of Turkish personnel associated with the F-35 program from the country, withdraw invitations to allow Turkey to participate in the annual CEO F-35 roundtable, and discontinue F-35 material deliveries and activities.

View attachment 9284
A Russian S-400 surface-to-air missile system.
Sergei Malgavko | TASS via Getty Images


Meanwhile, nearly 13 countries have expressed interest in buying Russia’s S-400, a move that could trigger potential U.S. sanctions under the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act, which President Donald Trump signed in August 2017. In September, the U.S. slapped sanctions on China for buying fighter jets and missiles from Russia. However, the U.S. could grant sanction waivers.

China, India and Turkey have already signed purchase agreements with the Kremlin. China, which is embroiled in a trade battle with the U.S., is in the middle of receiving its final shipment of the S-400 system. India signed a deal with Moscow for the S-400 in October. Turkey is slated to receive its S-400 as early as this week and is expected to have the system ready for use by 2020.

 

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Turkey Accepts Russian S-400 Missile System



A Russian cargo plane carrying parts of Russia's S-400 missile defense system landed at a military air base near Ankara on Friday.

The first pieces of the S-400 missile defense system Turkey bought from Russia — against the wishes of the U.S. and NATO — began arriving Friday, according to Turkey's National Defense Ministry. In response, the Pentagon is expected to announce that Turkey will be barred from receiving the new F-35 fighter.

Turkey went ahead with the deal despite warnings from the U.S. that buying the Russian system could prompt sanctions. On Friday, Turkey's Defense Ministry announced via Twitter that the first component had arrived at the Murted Air Base in Ankara. Photos from the scene showed a large Russian cargo jet landing and opening its nose cone to unload large equipment, which was kept under tarps.

 

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Video of delivery of first s-400 to Turkey today
Wait for the currency to fall back against the dollar and maybe heavy sanctions against Turkey. We might see Turkey getting expelled from NATO as well who knows.
 

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