Could the UAE Purchase F-35 Jets Meant for Turkey? Sales to Abu Dhabi Are in America’s Interest | Page 6 | World Defense

Could the UAE Purchase F-35 Jets Meant for Turkey? Sales to Abu Dhabi Are in America’s Interest

Scorpion

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Thank You my young friend for the tag. The K-FX is yet to fly, so we have to wait and see what exactly does it bring to the table. Is it worth inducting a newer platform, if the capability is only marginally better than the Blk60. OR would an F15-EX with Silent Eagle DNA be a better choice.
Yes, we shall see if the project is able to become as stealthy as even an F-117 type aircraft. If it can reach that level it would already blow F-16 block 60 out of the water in my opinion.
 

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Yes, we shall see if the project is able to become as stealthy as even an F-117 type aircraft. If it can reach that level it would already blow F-16 block 60 out of the water in my opinion.
With Haveglass, and its custom EW suite, it is not that easy to blow Blk60 out of the water. It is a lot more customized than most people are aware of.

The next new platform, has very high benchmarks to meet.
 

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Bipartisan bill proposed to give Israel veto on US arms sales to Middle East

Legislation would require US president to consult with Jerusalem to ensure qualitative military edge concerns are settled; proposal comes ahead of planned sale of F-35s to UAE
By Ron Kampeas
03 October 2020,

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In this August 5, 2019, photo released by the US Air Force, an F-35 fighter jet pilot and crew prepare for a mission at Al-Dhafra Air Base in the United Arab Emirates. (Staff Sgt. Chris Thornbury/US Air Force via AP)

WASHINGTON (JTA) — A bipartisan bill introduced in the House of Representatives would enhance protections for Israel’s qualitative military edge to include an effective Israeli veto on US arms sales to the Middle East.

The bill “would require the President to consult with the Israeli government to ensure [qualitative military edge] concerns are settled” when it comes to arms sales to Middle Eastern countries, said the news release Friday announcing its introduction the previous day. The release came from the office of the bill’s lead sponsor, Illinois Democrat Rep. Brad Schneider.

Existing law already guarantees Israel a qualitative military edge in the Middle East, but Congress — not Israel — is the arbiter of whether an arms sale meets QME standards.

Most of the sponsors are Democrats, including a number of Jewish lawmakers, among them Schneider, Elaine Luria of Virginia, Max Rose of New York, Josh Gottheimer of New Jersey, and Ted Deutch and Debbie Wasserman Schultz of Florida.

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Democratic Illinois Representative Brad Schneider. (Courtesy/JTA)

Jewish Democrats expressed alarm after it was revealed that, parallel with the US-brokered normalization deal between Israel and the United Arab Emirates, the Trump administration was negotiating the sale of state-of-the-art F-35 stealth combat jets to the UAE.
Israel opposes the sale.

AIPAC, the prominent Israel lobby, supports the new measure.
 

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House bill would reinforce Israel's 'qualitative military edge'
Oct. 5, 2020
By Ed Adamczyk

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A bill introduced last week in the U.S. House virtually guarantees Israel's qualitative military edge in armaments, specifically the F-35s flown by it's air force. Photo courtesy of Israeli air force

Oct. 5 (UPI) -- Legislation was introduced in the U.S. House which essentially guarantees Israel's qualitative military edge over Middle East countries.

The bill, led by Rep. Brad Schneider, D-Ill., calls for a commitment to Israel's qualitative military edge, a legislated U.S. pledge to Israel under the Arms Export Control Act.

"This bill strengthens that commitment and reminds the administration of its obligations under the law," Schneider said in a statement.

Introduced Friday, the legislation comes after Israeli concerns that President Donald Trump's administration plans to sell F-35 fighter planes to the United Arab Emirates.

Israel is currently the only Middle East country with the advanced fighter planes, and the UAE purchase could destabilize a balance of power, members of Congress have warned.


"With all due respect, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that if Israel's the only country in the Middle East that has F-35s, that selling it to someone else no longer produces that qualitative military edge in the air," Sen. Bob Menendez, R-N.J., said at a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Sept. 24.

Schneider was joined in submitting the House bill on Friday by two Republicans and 13 Democrats, which seeks to reaffirm the role of congressional consultation regarding Israel's qualitative military edge, a practice employed since the 1960s, in U.S. sale of arms, they said.

The bill would require the White House to report to Congress on how any arms sale would impact Israel within 60 days.

While not providing Israel with blanket veto power over U.S. sales, "Israel is our single most important ally in the Middle East, and Congress will not let any President undermine her security with unapproved weapons sales," Schneider said.
 

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Trump administration's proposed F-35 sale to UAE hits snag

The proposed sale is a result of the recent agreement in which the Gulf state and Bahrain, established diplomatic ties with Israel


The Trump administration proposal to sell the F-35, the world’s most advanced and sophisticated stealth warplane to the United Arab Emirates, the UAE, is facing turbulence.

Sen. Jim Risch, R-Idaho, the chairman of the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has raised concerns about the proposed sale and its impact on the security of U.S. technology and its impact on Israel’s defense.

"Any potential arms sales must continue congressional consultations on meeting our obligation to retain Israel's Qualitative Military Edge and satisfying the other requirements of the Arms Export Control Act," the senator recently told the committee.

"It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that if Israel's the only country in the Middle East that has F-35's, that selling it to someone else no longer produces that qualitative military edge in the air," said ranking member Senator Bob Menendez, D-N.J., who was skeptical of the potential sale to the UAE and questioned whether it is even allowed under U.S. law.

The proposed sale is a result of the recent agreement in which the Gulf state and Bahrain, established diplomatic ties with Israel. That development has been hailed as a historic step for Middle East peace, but some fear that an unspoken part of the deal is providing the F-35 to the UAE, which has alarmed some because of Abu Dhabi's close ties to the Chinese defense establishment and trade with Iran.

"Foreign military sales are a diplomatic tool used to advance our relationships, but they cannot come at the expense of our security," says Joel Rubin, president of the Washington Strategy Group and former deputy assistant secretary of state in the Obama administration.

"When the U.S. engages in military sales with foreign governments, we do so with the understanding that our military technology will not be used to help our adversaries," Rubin told Fox News.

"In the case of the UAE, as well as with any other country, we must be guaranteed that they are protecting our technology - in this case, the crown jewel of the F-35 - and not sharing it with our adversaries like Russia, China, and Iran," he says.

Reports say the U.A.E. has extensive ties with the Chinese military, recently buying Beijing's low altitude laser defense system that can be used to target drones, along with Chinese battle tanks and other advanced armaments, such as underwater equipment.

UAE officials say the country needs military supplies to strengthen its security. But concerns have been raised at not only how an F-35 sale could impact Israel's defense, the only Middle-East nation that now flies the plane, but also if U.S. technology could be compromised if the UAE acquires the planes.

UAE Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Anwar Gargash tried to reassure skeptics last month.

"Our military is one of the capable Arab armies, it is not a big army, but modernizing this army is an important concern for us, it’s an important force deterrent for the UAE, and it is logical that our Air Force would move from its 20 year F-16's to the f-35," he told a small group of reporters during a virtual briefing last month.

He called selling it to his country the right thing to do."

"My view is that the UAE has been a capable partner, a partner that shares the burden with the United States in Afghanistan, Kosovo, anti-ISIS, against the ISIS caliphate in other places and as a result, it is only logical that these legitimate requirements of the UAE are met."

But Rubin says the UAE's ties to China and others, raises real red flags.

"There is a long history of military cooperation between the UAE and both Russia and China, as well as significant trade with Iran, as the UAE is Iran’s largest gulf state trading partner. These relationships create vulnerabilities that, if the F-35 technology falls into their hands, would render the superiority of our technology for us and our allies, like Israel, meaningless," he warns.

"Selling it to the UAE without the necessary protections that the cessation of the UAE’s close military relationships with Russia and China would paradoxically create a security vulnerability for us. We do not want either of these countries to understand how to defeat the F-35. This should be the price for sharing such an important technology."

The warnings that Russia could acquire the technology from the sale were echoed by Samuel Ramani, a nonresident fellow at the Gulf International Forum, in Foreign Policy.

"Selling F-35's to the United Arab Emirates could give Russia access to U.S. technology and erode Israel's regional military edge," he wrote.

"The United States should refrain from exporting F-35's to the UAE until Abu Dhabi takes tangible steps toward decoupling from Russia," saying that any technology transfer "could allow Moscow to produce missile defense systems that can shoot down U.S. aircraft."

But others point out that the UAE is a trustworthy ally that can safeguard the F-35, as have other nations that helped develop or plan to receive the warplane. It is now flying with the Air Forces of Italy, Japan, Norway, South Korea, the United Kingdom, besides Israel for a total of roughly 500 in service around the globe.

In 2009, the Obama administration signed what is known as the 123 Civil Nuclear Cooperation Agreement with the UAE, which is considered “the gold standard” of international commitments when it comes to nuclear material. The agreement enables the UAE to receive nuclear material and knowledge from Washington. It remains a vital security arraignment with Abu Dhabi.

President Trump has said that he would have “no problem in selling them (the UAE) the F-35. I would have absolutely no problem.”
 
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