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BATMAN

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it can be the quickest way of establishing inheritance or can be used as proof of succession in digital form for starters, the use cases are there but they way it's been projected and marketed is simply stupid.

Of course, but inheritance require bit more process and documentation. One can always go to NADRA office and have a printout, or have the data emailed to relevant dpt.
Infect, now i see more crimes in future. I also find it unIslamic, to make private information of people available at finger tips, all what it takes is a NID card number. If you have a friend at NADRA you can have ID card number of any one. In every application form, there's NID card number mentioned..... WTF were they thinking?
I can tell you, with stunt of 'wife can know the about second wife of husband' is marketing technique of ruling elite, who is actually dancing on the tunes of enemies of Pakistan.
 

Pakhtoon yum

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Stupid though, but what does it have to do with prevailing education syllabus in Pakistan's private schools? Are those as well supported by Americans? or what?
Don't quote me nawaz worshiper, go pray to ur God nawaz.
 

War Historian

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I'm sorry, i didn't understand.. how can we have books of science & engineering in local language - Urdu?

National language of Pakistan is Urdu for street level communication purpose, involving uneducated people, while official language is English, this can also be used for communication as well, when we feel audience is educated, which is as well the language of computer, this is how my key board is built and this is how i'm skilled to type!
So it means never ever books and latest science literature would be translated into urdu??
Then how Chinese, German, French, Japanese and Korean people are educating their kids in local language.if we have a will then there is a way.
Otherwise we would have a lot of excuses to continue in foreign language. Or in the end we have solution also to convert all the national syllabus into English language for all private and govt school.
 

BATMAN

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So it means never ever books and latest science literature would be translated into urdu??
Exactly.
Unfortunately, Urdu is too late in the race. It's a relative new language and no one tried to keep it updated.
Actually years ago, use of vocabulary was much larger. One can see this in old written books.
Example... can any child of Urdu medium tell us what would he call an electric lamp in Urdu! Most likely he can't tell, and yet i'm English medium and i can tell, and than there is ocean of terms in each subject of sciences. It's mission impossible.
Therefore, we shall run in the direction of the motion of bus and jump aboard, otherwise we'll be isolated in this connected world, where English is coming a top as global language.

Then how Chinese, German, French, Japanese and Korean people are educating their kids in local language.if we have a will then there is a way.
Otherwise we would have a lot of excuses to continue in foreign language. Or in the end we have solution also to convert all the national syllabus into English language for all private and govt school.
Unlike Urdu, those languages existed many centuries ago and were present at the time of industrial revolution.
EU have started to learn English as a compulsory subject. although, they can largely survive without English, mainly because most of them get jobs locally.

Let's take the case of India, are they going to change books of science to local languages /Hindi?

Imran khan has simply wasted time of nation and state. His 'bongy' has already costed state billions in shape of human resource.
 

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Abu Dhabi Offshore Exploration Block Awarded to a Consortium led by Pakistan Petroleum Limited in Historic Concession Agreement​



First-time Pakistani companies will invest in and explore for oil and gas in an Abu Dhabi concession

Award builds on the deep-rooted bilateral ties between the UAE and Pakistan

Pakistan Petroleum Limited led consortium awarded concession for Offshore Block 5 and will invest $304.7 million (AED1.12 billion) during the exploration phase

Award underscores ADNOC’s expanded approach to strategic partnerships and concludes Abu Dhabi’s second competitive block bid round



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Abu Dhabi, UAE – August 31, 2021: The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC) announced today, the signing of a historic exploration concession agreement, awarding the exploration rights for Abu Dhabi’s Offshore Block 5 to a consortium of four Pakistani companies – Pakistan Petroleum Limited (PPL), Mari Petroleum Company Limited (MPCL), Oil and Gas Development Company Limited (OGDCL), and Government Holdings (Private) Limited (GHPL) – in Abu Dhabi’s second competitive block bid round. The consortium is led by PPL.

The award marks the first time Pakistani companies invest in and explore for oil and gas in an Abu Dhabi concession as well as the first time ADNOC partners with Pakistani energy companies.

The historic agreement builds on the deep-rooted bilateral relationship between the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the Islamic Republic of Pakistan and underscores ADNOC’s expanded approach to strategic partnerships, including those who can provide access to key growth markets for the company’s crude oil and products.


The exploration concession agreement was signed by His Excellency Dr. Sultan Ahmed Al Jaber, UAE Minister of Industry and Advanced Technology and Managing Director and Group CEO of ADNOC, and Moin Raza Khan, Managing Director and CEO of PPL.

H.E. Dr. Al Jaber said: “This historic exploration concession award marks a new chapter of energy cooperation in the 50-year old UAE-Pakistan relationship. It represents an important platform upon which we can drive win-win opportunities to support Pakistan’s energy security and further strengthen the strategic and economic ties between our two countries. We are delighted to partner with Pakistan Petroleum Limited and the other members of the consortium on Offshore Block 5.
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“The consortium was selected as part of Abu Dhabi’s block bid round where we have once again reinforced our approach to strategic partnerships that contribute the right combination of market access, capital, best-in-class expertise or advanced technology. We are very optimistic about the potential to unlock significant value with all our partners in this second competitive block bid round as we continue to accelerate the exploration and development of Abu Dhabi’s untapped resources, in line with the Leadership’s wise directives.”

Under the terms of the agreement, the consortium will hold a 100% stake in the exploration phase, investing up to $304.7 million (AED1.12 billion) towards exploration and appraisal drilling, including a participation fee, to explore for and appraise oil and gas opportunities in the block that covers an offshore area of 6,223 square kilometers and is located 100 kilometers north east of Abu Dhabi city.

Khan said: “The PPL-led consortium is delighted to be selected for the concession award of Abu Dhabi’s Offshore Block-5. This award is not only a watershed moment for Pakistan and the Emirate of Abu Dhabi towards bilateral energy cooperation and economic links but also offers an opportunity to strengthen strategic cooperation with ADNOC to share technical know-how and expertise.


“We are particularly excited that this consortium comprises the ‘big four’ national exploration and production companies that are fully geared to support ADNOC and the Emirate of Abu Dhabi in reinforcing its leading position in the global energy sector.”

Following a successful commercial discovery during the exploration phase, the consortium will have the right to a production concession to develop and produce such commercial discoveries. ADNOC has the option to hold a 60% stake in the production phase of the concession. The term of the production phase is 35 years from the commencement of the exploration phase and the block offers the potential to create significant in-country value for the UAE over the lifetime of the concession.

In addition to drilling exploration and appraisal wells, the exploration phase will see the consortium leverage and contribute financially and technically to ADNOC’s mega seismic survey, which is acquiring 3D seismic data within the block area. The data already acquired over a large part of the block combined with its proximity to existing oil and gas fields, suggests the concession area has promising potential.

ADNOC launched Abu Dhabi’s second competitive block bid round in 2019, offering a set of major onshore and offshore blocks, on behalf of the Government of Abu Dhabi. The award of Offshore Block 5 to the Pakistani consortium concludes this second block bid round, which has seen very competitive proposals submitted for the geographical areas offered.

Following ADNOC’s recent discoveries of 22 billion stock tank barrels (STB) of recoverable unconventional oil resources and 160 trillion standard cubic feet (SCF) of recoverable unconventional gas resources, it was decided not to award an exploration license for Onshore Block 2. ADNOC intends to engage with potential partners for unconventional resource licensing opportunities around this geographical area. This area contains some of the unconventional resources discovered that have production potential ranking alongside the most prolific North American shale oil plays.

As part of Abu Dhabi’s second block bid round, ADNOC awarded Offshore Block 4 to a wholly-owned subsidiary of Cosmo Energy Holdings Co., Ltd.; Offshore Block 3 to a consortium led by wholly-owned subsidiaries of Eni and PTT Exploration and Production Public Company Limited (PTTEP); and Onshore Block 5 to Occidental. Based on existing data from detailed petroleum system studies, seismic surveys, exploration, and appraisal wells data, estimates suggest the blocks in this second bid round hold multiple billion barrels of oil and multiple trillion cubic feet of natural gas.

PPL operates 15 producing fields across Pakistan and contributes over 20% of the country’s total natural gas supplies. As of June 2020, PPL’s proven recoverable reserves were 1,793.5 billion cubic feet (bcf) of natural gas, 13.3 million barrels (mmbbl) of oil/ NGL/ condensate and 543.1 thousand tonnes (Ktons) of LPG.



 

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6th Sept is Defence & Martyrs Day. On this occasion Pakistan Armed Forces pay tribute to the fallen ones, who gave the ultimate sacrifice:



 

BATMAN

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Very informative interview of former ISI cheif on Afghan affairs and this is every bit of truth.
Interview is in Urdu sorry about that but if any one have any open question, i can answer by quoting from interview.
 

BATMAN

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Visually impaired, Pakistani foreign office official at UN talking about Indian occupied Kashmir.
very impressive
 

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PTI leadership seeks explanation from Amir Dogar for ‘inappropriate’ statements

They say Dogar must be prudent on national security issues
SAMAA | Abbas Shabbir - Posted: Oct 13, 2021 | Last Updated: 23 mins ago

The leadership of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf has demanded an explanation from the party’s chief whip in the National Assembly Amir Dogar for making ‘out of context’ comments on the appointment of the director-general of ISI.

It is reliably learnt that top figures in the government and party hierarchy were upset over his televised interview.

PTI leadership believed that Dogar’s interview had created inappropriate impression at national and political levels.

According to party leaders, providing details of official meetings was the responsibility of the ministry of information and relevant spokespersons.

A senior party leader said that Dogar should have adopted a more prudent approach while dealing with national security issues.

On Tuesday, Dogar, in an interview on SAMAA TV show Nadeem Malik Live, said Prime Minister Imran Khan wanted to retain the director-general of the Inter Services Intelligence.

He revealed that the premier wanted to keep DG ISI Lieutenant-General Faiz Hameed on his post in view of the emerging situation in Afghanistan.

The PM took the cabinet into confidence on this issue and told the members that he wished to retain Faiz Hameed as DG ISI for a few months until a settlement in Afghanistan was achieved, Dogar said.

He quoted the prime minister as saying that he enjoyed an ideal relationship with Chief of Army Staff Qamar Javed Bajwa.
 

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System’s widening cracks

Zahid Hussain
Published October 13, 2021

The writer is the author of No-Win War — The Paradox of US-Pakistan Relations in Afghanistan’s Shadow.


HYBRID rule may have delivered a semblance of political stability to the country but the system also has an inherent source of tension. The imbalance of power between the security establishment and the civilian side could lead to a breakdown of the political structure. Most previous civilian governments in Pakistan can be described as amalgams with certain policy areas remaining strictly under the establishment’s domain. Civilian control is a misnomer given the heavy shadow cast by security agencies over the country’s political landscape.

But the present political set-up has been the first experiment in what can be described as truly hybrid rule, with the establishment providing the plank on which it is pivoted. Notwithstanding some minor glitches, the arrangement has worked well over the past three years propping up a shaky coalition government.

Some cracks, however, seem to have emerged in the alignment in recent weeks. The reported clash between the prime minister and the security leadership over the appointment of the ISI chief is symptomatic of the widening gap between the two. The fault lines are hard to fix.

Editorial: The intense discussion on new DG ISI's appointment is a sad reflection of state of affairs in Pakistan

It’s obvious that the prime minister chose the wrong issue for asserting his authority. His reported insistence on retaining the outgoing spymaster raised questions about possible political motives. The military leadership reacted by notifying the appointment of the new chief apparently without the prime minister’s approval and in violation of the rules, leading to a stand-off.

The recent stand-off has exposed the growing gap between the civil and military leadership.

Regardless of the outcome, a growing gap between the civil and military leadership has been revealed. There are some other issues too making things more complicated. According to political observers, the two sides are not seen to be on the same page in the handling of critical foreign and security matters. How to deal with the TTP has become a contentious issue too with the prime minister appearing too eager to reconcile with the outlawed militant group that is responsible for the death of thousands of Pakistanis.

Editorial: PM's argument that TTP is a product of Pakhtun nationalism is dangerously flawed

Curiously, the strains within the hybrid structure have appeared as politics in the country is getting into election mode. Some PTI insiders maintain that it is imperative for the party to shed the tag of ‘selected’ before going to polls. But it will not be so easy for the party leadership to delink itself completely from the security establishment whose support is seen as critical to its rise to power.

An unstable coalition administration with a very thin majority cannot afford to take on the establishment, and it is especially difficult for a government with a weak democratic credentials to do so. Over the last three years, the prime minister’s policy of confrontation has weakened
democratic institutions.

His contempt for elected institutions is evident. His refusal to engage with the opposition even on important constitutional matters and to develop a national consensus on crucial foreign and security policies has given greater space to the security establishment that has reinforced its position as an arbiter of power.

A divided opposition may not present any significant challenge to the government but the latter’s undemocratic moves could further erode its political position. Over the last few months, the government has brought several laws through presidential ordinances bypassing parliament.

The most controversial move has been the amendment in NAB rules extending the term in office of the incumbent chairman whose credibility and impartiality have been questioned. One-sided accountability of the opposition leaders has made the anti-corruption body controversial and an extension for an individual heading a tainted process simply reinforces allegations of a witch-hunt.

There is some truth to the accusation that the PTI government is destroying civilian state institutions in a systematic manner. The government has been running a concerted campaign against the chief election commissioner making the constitutional body (ECP) controversial. Instead of sitting with the opposition for reforming election rules to make the polls free and fair, the PTI government is trying to impose unilateral changes in the electoral process. Ignoring the ECP’s objections, the prime minister is adamant on using electronic voting machines in the next polls.

This system has not been tried before in the country. The opposition has already rejected the proposal for electronic voting. Any one-sided decision to change the voting process will make the coming elections controversial and deal a serious blow to the already messed-up democratic process. Lacking in governance the government is increasingly resorting to authoritarian practices.

Instead of focusing on more pressing problems eg economic downturn and skyrocketing inflation, the government is continuing on a divisive path. Meanwhile, the country is facing serious external policy and national security challenges with the fast-changing regional geopolitics. But there seems to be no realisation in the government about the seriousness of the situation. Populist rhetoric has been taken as a substitute for clear policy direction.

Most worrying is the prime minister’s recent statement on talks with elements of the proscribed TTP. He said the negotiations were part of the reconciliation process and that those who are willing to lay down arms would be pardoned. The offer of amnesty raises questions about the government’s counterterrorism policy. The reconciliation move would wipe out the gains made by the security forces in the battle against terrorism.

Interestingly, in the face of such daunting challenges, the prime minister’s lectures on morality and Islamic history have become more frequent and persistent. He seems to be more concerned about what he describes as “rising obscenity” in society. He recently set up a new Islamic authority that would monitor the country’s education system and media. Such moves won’t take the country forward.

Even if the current tension between the civilian and military leadership is resolved soon, it may not address the inherent problems in the hybrid structure. The weakening of the democratic process and worsening governance will further increase the imbalance.

The writer is the author of No-Win War — The Paradox of US-Pakistan Relations in Afghanistan’s Shadow.
[email protected]
Twitter: @hidhussain

Published in Dawn, October 13th, 2021
 
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